Pretending to take meds.....

Discussion in 'I care for a person with dementia' started by piph, Apr 29, 2015.

  1. piph

    piph Registered User

    Feb 4, 2013
    1,530
    Northamptonshire
    Some months ago I was getting very frequent reports from Mum's carers that she was 'pretending' to take her tablets, and then hiding them.

    She had quite a few to take, morning and evening. It became such a battle that I spoke to her GP who looked carefully at all the meds, none of them were for anything life-threatening, and she'd been on them so long that they probably weren't having much effect anyway, decided to stop them all except for the Donepizil.

    Things have been going well since then, meds wise, with the carer just having to give her one tablet a day at tea-time. But it's started again - pretending to take it then trying to put it in her pocket or down the side of the cushion in her armchair.

    Mum seems to have fixated on a long-ago instruction to take a particular tablet with a meal (this was the reason she fought against taking the morning meds as she hadn't had her breakfast, carers offering to get her breakfast for her, but her refusing).

    Now the same thing is happening in the evening if she refuses to let the carer get her a meal (probably 3 or 4 times a week!)

    All her carers say that they have never known a person do this before - actually pretending to take them and then hiding them! Either they just need reminding, or outright refuse!

    Just wonder what other TPers think about this.
     
  2. sistermillicent

    sistermillicent Registered User

    Jan 30, 2009
    2,951
    My mum used to hide her tablets and pretend she had taken them too, we used to watch her closely..pockets were the usual place. All we did was try again a few minutes later to see if she felt more like taking them. Sometimes they were thrown at us!
    Then we went on to giving med covertly on her food or in drinks as she was so very aggressive and angry.
    Now that she has deteriorated so much she can once again take them as tablets, no protests about anything.

    Can you get Donezipil or whatever it is in liquid form? It might be easier to give it.
     
  3. Grannie G

    Grannie G Volunteer Moderator

    Apr 3, 2006
    68,735
    Kent
    My husband used to hide his tablets in his pyjama pockets or throw them out of the toilet window. Our grandson found them on the floor outside.

    One day my husband told me he wasn`t well and I said it was because he wasn`t taking his tablets. It solved the problem for a while but then I realised he was having trouble swallowing some of the bigger ones so wherever possible we gave him liquid meds.
     
  4. piph

    piph Registered User

    Feb 4, 2013
    1,530
    Northamptonshire
    It is available as a liquid, I just don't think it will make any difference - it's the fact that she wants to take it with a meal, and if she doesn't want a meal then she doesn't want to take it! Mum is very stubborn, and although she accepts the carers coming in, she really doesn't think she needs them and thinks it's an imposition! She has become very sly, constantly says what she thinks I want to hear, whether it is the truth or not. I know it's the dementia talking, but that doesn't make it any easier to cope with her!
     
  5. Kevinl

    Kevinl Registered User

    Aug 24, 2013
    4,668
    Salford
  6. piph

    piph Registered User

    Feb 4, 2013
    1,530
    Northamptonshire
    That would be fine if I were living with her, but she lives alone. She often refuses anything the carers might offer her, be it a meal or a cup of tea or even a fresh glass of water.

    Sorry, don't mean to be dismissing these ideas out of hand, but I think we'll just have to carry on as we are and hope the carers can get her to take it, at least most of the time. Quite frankly, I'm not sure it's actually making a difference anyway, and of she's not taking it every day, well .......
     
  7. Grannie G

    Grannie G Volunteer Moderator

    Apr 3, 2006
    68,735
    Kent
    My husband's GP said we shouldn't force him to take medication even if he lacks capacity. Dhiren refused calcium for osteoporosis and the GP recorded in his notes his refusal.

    You could be right piph thinking the Meds are ineffective anyway. I'm sure when the body starts breaking down this must happen.

    We can only do our best .
     
  8. Beate

    Beate Registered User

    May 21, 2014
    11,499
    Female
    London
    Donepezil is available as a liquid? I asked the doctor once and he said it wasn't! Shall have to go back...
     
  9. Grey Lad

    Grey Lad Registered User

    Sep 12, 2014
    5,737
    North East Lincs
    My Admiral Nurse counsels not to make an issue out of refusal to take meds. We are at the point of dropping statins from Maureen's cocktail of meds since stroke. There is little evidence of benefit and many contra indicators including a risk of confusion. Despite the blister pack there is a constant battle on most days with suggestions that I may be overdosing my dear wife and thinning her blood needlessly.
     
  10. susy

    susy Registered User

    Jul 29, 2013
    806
    North East
    Would she be better taking it at a different time of day? Might be a daft suggestion but hey... Anything is worth a try x
     
  11. piph

    piph Registered User

    Feb 4, 2013
    1,530
    Northamptonshire
    I think I'm just going to stick to the way things are - change is one of the things that she really struggles with. I'm very much afraid that I have recently had a 'compassion bypass'! Awful to say I know, but helping her has become such a battle - no, I lie, - it's always been a battle, and I'm just worn out with worrying about her, hour after hour, day after day. I know I don't have it anywhere near as bad as some of you out there who are caring physically as well. But all the care is in place, and, as the SW says, it's up to her whether she accepts it or not.

    But thanks for your ideas everyone - I didn't really expect solutions, just opinions.
     

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