1. Reds

    Reds Registered User

    Sep 5, 2011
    539
    Hertfordshire
    Can carer's get free prescriptions?

    Reds
     
  2. nitram

    nitram Registered User

    Apr 6, 2011
    18,623
    Male
    North Manchester
    Yes, under the normal rules - age or specific medical conditions.
    Being a carer makes no difference.
     
  3. Beate

    Beate Registered User

    May 21, 2014
    11,550
    Female
    London
    You do get a free flu jab as a carer though.
     
  4. garnuft

    garnuft Registered User

    Sep 7, 2012
    6,589
    No. Carer's don't get free prescriptions unless they're also in receipt of a qualifying benefit. You also pay NHS Dental costs, eye tests and fees for spectacles.
     
  5. Reds

    Reds Registered User

    Sep 5, 2011
    539
    Hertfordshire
    Thank you. Think would be good for carers only receiving a carers allowance to be able to receive free prescriptions. I not altogether clear whether its possible for me or not.

    Reds
     
  6. garnuft

    garnuft Registered User

    Sep 7, 2012
    6,589
    Reds, I only get carers allowance, I pay for prescriptions etc. I am 54, free prescriptions etc. for pensioners, prescribed illnesses, Welsh, Scots and NI... NOT if you're English.:mad:
     
  7. Reds

    Reds Registered User

    Sep 5, 2011
    539
    Hertfordshire
    Thank you. Handy to know about the flu jab as I have being paying for one for a few years now.
     
  8. Beate

    Beate Registered User

    May 21, 2014
    11,550
    Female
    London
    Carers allowance isn't really classed a benefit, I think. Yes you are not allowed to earn more than a certain amount but it's not means-tested in terms of savings. I guess the argument is that if you were low on savings you were entitled to other benefits which would entitle you to free prescriptions.
     
  9. garnuft

    garnuft Registered User

    Sep 7, 2012
    6,589
    Nothing to do with savings. I have been a carer since I was 21 years old. I have never been able to earn a decent income never mind build up savings.

    Pensioners receive free prescriptions, as do the welsh, scots and northern Irish...regardless of savings or income or BOTH.

    Carers Allowance is a benefit.
     
  10. Beate

    Beate Registered User

    May 21, 2014
    11,550
    Female
    London
    Sorry, garnuft, didn't mean to contradict you. And I think that carers should get more money and free prescriptions.
     
  11. garnuft

    garnuft Registered User

    Sep 7, 2012
    6,589
    Sorry Beate. I didn't mean to be so gruff.

    I had flu in September and had to pay £16 for two items, first prescription I've had for YEARS...I can't afford to be ill on SO many levels, it gets my back up. :eek: xx
     
  12. rocituk

    rocituk Registered User

    Jan 6, 2015
    1
    prepayment certificate

    you could always apply for a prepayment certificate. It will depend on how many items you have per year, but it could save you some money.

    I don't have sufficient posts to enable me to put a link here, but if you search for prepayment certificate you will find the details on the NHSBSA website.
     
  13. Sue J

    Sue J Registered User

    Dec 9, 2009
    8,042
    http://www.nhsbsa.nhs.uk/1127.aspx
     
  14. Beate

    Beate Registered User

    May 21, 2014
    11,550
    Female
    London
    No, I shouldn't post before I have my facts right! I guess it makes me feel better not to think of CA as a benefit but as a payment for my services (albeit a measly one) - after all you get NI contributions for it!

    I was on free prescriptions for five years due to a borderline thyroid problem I had. I was most surprised when the pharmacist told me about my entitlement. You get it for that but not for cancer? A lot in this system is skew-whiff.
     
  15. Not so Rosy

    Not so Rosy Registered User

    Nov 30, 2013
    580
    Prescriptions for Cancer Patients ( in England anyway) have been free since 2009.
     
  16. Beate

    Beate Registered User

    May 21, 2014
    11,550
    Female
    London
    Oh that's good. I got my certificate way before that and always thought that was odd.
     
  17. WILLIAMR

    WILLIAMR Account Closed

    Apr 12, 2014
    1,079
    Cancer is a strange one.
    Somebody I know had cancer treatment early in 2000 and happily got his all clear in early 2005. He is now in his mid 40's.
    He has however been instructed to continue having the flu jab and got that free since 2000.
    He was very surprised when his doctor wrote to him in 2009 and said he entitled to free prescriptions for life.
    Oddly he says he has only had 3 prescriptions since 2009 so it has not changed his lifestyle much.

    William
     
  18. garnuft

    garnuft Registered User

    Sep 7, 2012
    6,589
    "Who is entitled to get free prescriptions in England?

    ⦁ If you are aged 60 or over.
    ⦁ If you are aged under 16.
    ⦁ If you are aged 16, 17 or 18 and in full-time education.
    ⦁ If you are pregnant, or have had a baby in the previous 12 months, and have an exemption certificate (see below).
    ⦁ If you have a listed medical condition and have an exemption certificate (see below).
    ⦁ If you are an NHS inpatient.
    ⦁ If you (or your partner) get one of the following:
    ⦁ Universal Credit.
    ⦁ Income Support.
    ⦁ Income-based Jobseeker's Allowance.
    ⦁ Income-related Employment and Support Allowance.
    ⦁ Pension Credit Guarantee Credit.
    ⦁ If you are entitled to, or named on, a valid NHS tax credit exemption certificate.
    ⦁ Some war pensioners - if treatment is connected with the pensionable disability.
    ⦁ People on a low income who have a certificate HC2 (see below).
    If you are entitled to free prescriptions, complete the declaration on the back of the prescription and sign it. You may be asked for proof that you are exempt.


    Who can get an exemption certificate?

    *(modified to exclude pregnancy exemption)

    People who have certain medical conditions
    Although there are many conditions requiring regular medication, only the following qualify for an exemption certificate:
    ⦁ Treatment for cancer; note this includes treatment for the effects of cancer, or treatment for the effects of a current or previous cancer treatment.
    ⦁ A permanent fistula requiring dressing.
    ⦁ Forms of hypoadrenalism such as Addison's disease.
    ⦁ Diabetes insipidus and other forms of hypopituitarism.
    ⦁ Diabetes mellitus, except where treatment is by diet alone.
    ⦁ Hypoparathyroidism.
    ⦁ Myxoedema (underactive thyroid) where thyroid hormone replacement is necessary.
    ⦁ Myasthenia gravis.
    ⦁ Epilepsy requiring continuous anticonvulsive medication.
    ⦁ A continuing physical disability which means you cannot go out without help from another person.

    If you have one of the specified conditions ask for an application form, FP92A, from your doctor's surgery. You need to fill it in and your doctor (or an authorised member of the practice staff) will sign to confirm the information you've given is correct. You will then be sent a Medical Exemption Certificate which is valid for five years.
    If you have a Medical Exemption Certificate all your prescriptions are free, whatever the medication is for.


    How can people on a low income apply for help?

    Some people on a low income may qualify for help with prescription charges. Your entitlement to help is based on your circumstances, such as your level of income, savings, etc. You will have to fill in an HC1 form 'Claim for Help with Health Costs' giving various details of your circumstances and then send it off in the prepaid envelope provided.

    If you qualify for help, you will be sent an HC2 Certificate for full help, or an HC3 Certificate for partial help, which you will need to produce when paying for your prescription. The certificate will tell you whom it covers and how long it lasts. If your circumstances change for the better, you can continue using the certificate until it expires. If your circumstances change for the worse during the period of the certificate, you should make another claim. If your circumstances will remain unchanged after the time period then make a new claim before the current certificate expires.

    See the NHS Business Services Authority Help with Health Costs website for details on how to get the HC1 claim form.

    Can I claim a refund for a prescription charge I have already paid?

    If you are on a low income, but have not yet got your exemption certificate then get a receipt form from the pharmacist when your prescription is dispensed. Note that you cannot get one later. When you get your exemption certificate, send the receipt form to the address on the form to get a refund."


    Copied from patient.co.uk
     
  19. Reds

    Reds Registered User

    Sep 5, 2011
    539
    Hertfordshire
    Thank you all!
     

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