1. Expert Q&A: Protecting a person with dementia from financial abuse - Weds 26 June, 3:30-4:30 pm

    Financial abuse can have serious consequences for a person with dementia. Find out how to protect a person with dementia from financial abuse.

    Sam, our Knowledge Officer (Legal and Welfare Rights) is our expert on this topic. She will be here to answer your questions on Wednesday 26 June between 3:30 - 4:30 pm.

    You can either post questions >here< or email them to us at talkingpoint@alzheimers.org.uk and we'll answer as many as we can on the day.

  1. dave786

    dave786 Registered User

    Nov 20, 2015
    3
    Hi my mother has early onset dementia she is 57 years old and gets DLA she today has received a letter that her DLA will be ending and being replaced with PIP but she must re-apply again it also says in the letter that we may call you for a assessment which I am really worried about my mother is a very sensitive person and me and the family no that if we told her that she has Dementia she will loose the will to live so we have kept it as a secret as there is a language barrier as well because she does not speak or understand much English.

    She has also got

    Diabetes
    High Cholesterol
    High Blood Pressure
    Asthma COPD
    Odema-Fluid in the body
    Depression

    What are the chances they will call her for a assessment because she gets anxious and if some how the assessor starts talking about memory problems. Thank you
     
  2. nita

    nita Registered User

    Dec 30, 2011
    1,770
    Female
    Essex
    You would think that assessors would be sensitive to people's needs but I can understand your worry.

    You can ask that someone accompany her to the assessment. It may not come to an interview. My brother received ESA after just completing the form - we were worried about the interview but in the end, he didn't have one. I think it may be the same with PIP.

    It sounds as if your mother has so many other health problems that the memory loss may not be touched upon much, unless that is the reason why she can't do certain things. You could concentrate on the other medical issues in the form to emphasise any difficulties she has. Having said that, if dementia-type problems are causing her the most incapacity, you would have to bring that in too. What happened when she got DLA? Did she have memory problems then? Hopefully, you would have kept a copy of the form and could build on that this time.
     
  3. fizzie

    fizzie Registered User

    Jul 20, 2011
    2,740
    I know two people who have been assessed for PIP now and both had a very good experience. I suggest someone passes the assessor a very clear note explaining that she doesn't know her dementia diagnosis and you don't want it mentioned - I think they will understand. If she doesn't speak much English would she understand the diagnosis anyway- but don't take the risk. I assume a family member will be with her anyway if her English isn't good - but if not I can only suggest that it would be a very good idea
     
  4. dave786

    dave786 Registered User

    Nov 20, 2015
    3
    When mother got DLA 2 years ago and memory was not a problem then it was only 12 months ago she strarted having memory problems GP requested a SpectScan and it showed up as dementia I have the letter. Thank you
     
  5. Kevinl

    Kevinl Registered User

    Aug 24, 2013
    4,665
    Salford
    Hi Dave, welcome to TP
    Of themselves; Diabetes, High Cholesterol, High Blood Pressure, Asthma COPD, Odema Fluid in the body, Depression aren't necessarily a qualification for PIP, plenty of people with some or many of these conditions do work I personally have 3 of them but with medication the cholesterol, blood pressure and asthma are all perfectly under control.
    That said if you have a diagnosis of dementia that I think is a pretty much auto qualification for help of some sort, if possible I'd try and delay the interview for the assessment until a diagnosis is sorted one way or another or at least you have a letter saying that is what the doctors are thinking.
    Denial is a difficult one I've had to live with a wife in denial for some years I just give the medical practitioners we come across (and there are quite a few) a letter from the consultant saying she has AZ, is in denial and can become aggressive if questioned, it usually shuts them up. Good luck.
    K
     
  6. dave786

    dave786 Registered User

    Nov 20, 2015
    3
    She does have a diagnose which I have a letter for. Her current DLA is for a indefinite period how is PIP granted?
     
  7. nitram

    nitram Registered User

    Apr 6, 2011
    18,310
    Male
    North Manchester
    "...how is PIP granted?"

    The applicant is assessed and awarded points which determine the payment.

    . PIP has two components:
    • The Daily Living component – intended to act as a
    contribution to the extra costs disabled people face in their dayto-day
    lives that do not relate to mobility; and
    • The Mobility component – intended to act as a contribution to
    the extra costs disabled people face in their day-to-day lives
    related to mobility.
    1.1.6. Both components are payable at either a standard rate or an
    enhanced rate, depending on a claimant’s circumstances.


    https://www.gov.uk/government/uploa...ent_data/file/449043/pip-assessment-guide.pdf
     
  8. Ashesinthewind

    Ashesinthewind Registered User

    May 30, 2015
    15
    I'll obviously have a proper read through this thread v soon, but just a quick question.

    Is ESA the 'same' as PIP?
     
  9. nitram

    nitram Registered User

    Apr 6, 2011
    18,310
    Male
    North Manchester
    "Is ESA the 'same' as PIP?"

    PIP>>>>over 65
    ESA>>>>under 65 but over 16
     
  10. nita

    nita Registered User

    Dec 30, 2011
    1,770
    Female
    Essex

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