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picking up tiny things off carpeting

Discussion in 'I care for a person with dementia' started by irisheyes, Aug 4, 2015.

  1. irisheyes

    irisheyes Registered User

    Aug 4, 2015
    3
    does anyone have good ideas for activities for my mother who picks up tiny things off carpet and likes to change her clothes a lot...it bothers my father and I would like to think of things for her to do that she would enjoy and it would distract her from the other habits
     
  2. Lindy50

    Lindy50 Registered User

    Dec 11, 2013
    5,239
    Cotswolds
    Hello irisheyes and welcome to TP :)

    Does your mother like sorting things? Might a box of bits and bobs like buttons and ribbons help? Also what were her interests in the past? Might she like artwork (you can get colouring books, colour wash sets etc especially for people with dementia).

    Or would she like listening to music?

    Just a few ideas.....hope you find something helpful soon :)

    Lindy xx
     
  3. Beate

    Beate Registered User

    May 21, 2014
    11,745
    Female
    London
    A twiddle muff comes to mind.
     
  4. Sooty2

    Sooty2 Registered User

    Jun 1, 2015
    30
    perception

    Hi,
    Often people with dementia have very different visual perceptions and Im assuming or summising here that the carpet is perhaps very heavily patterned? Often heavily patterned things can become optical illusions, so that mum is perhaps seeing things within it, she may be seeing faces, insects or a range of other things which results in the constant picking up and fiddling, if she believes she has picked something up and put it on her clothes this may be why she is removing them. Some people with dementia also have issues with spatial awareness and determining colours, so have difficulty sitting down as they do not know where their body is in relation to objects, and if everything blends in, for example, white toilet seat in a toilet with white walls they may not pick it out easily, environment is a key factor in some of our relatives strange behaviours, just food for thought really.
     
  5. janetlynn

    janetlynn Registered User

    Jul 22, 2012
    107
    England
    Hi,

    When my Mother in law was in the early stages, she enjoyed, with a little help and encouragement, doing jigsaw puzzles. I bought her jigsaws with large pieces, usually for children and they kept her occupied for a time. Hope this is helpful.

    Janet.
     

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