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Physically fit, but mentally not and in a care home

Thedeckking

New member
Aug 31, 2020
2
0
Hi everyone. I've been caring for my mum for the last 2 years. She developed Alzheimer's in her early sixties and has recently gone into a dementia care home as she needs support 24/7.On the whole it's been great for her but with 1 big issue. She's a good 10 to 20 years younger than the other residents and is generally physically fit. The home gets her outside as much as possible, but its hard matching activities for her with the capabilities of the other residents.
Any advice on what we can do? Are there homes specifically for younger people with Alzheimer's?
We're in Hyde, East of Manchester - is there any support locally?
Thanks, Steve
 

Jaded'n'faded

Registered User
Jan 23, 2019
1,958
0
High Peak
I wonder if the care home could give her a job? Sounds bizarre, but maybe she'd enjoy something easy - helping to fold laundry, setting tables at lunchtime, sweeping the patio outside in good weather, something like that.

My mother was older but nothing wrong with her physically when she went in the care home. She wasn't able to do much (of any use!) but was happy given a pile of envelopes to sort out in the office or dusting the handrails in the corridors. When she was first there, she would pack her stuff to leave every day then sit by the door, hoping to escape. But the admin lady gave her a notebook and pen and asked her to keep a record of all the people who came and went. Mum loved doing that! Well - mostly she didn't do it but she liked thinking she was doing it...
 

Eogz

Registered User
Sep 9, 2021
21
0
I wonder if the care home could give her a job? Sounds bizarre, but maybe she'd enjoy something easy - helping to fold laundry, setting tables at lunchtime, sweeping the patio outside in good weather, something like that.

My mother was older but nothing wrong with her physically when she went in the care home. She wasn't able to do much (of any use!) but was happy given a pile of envelopes to sort out in the office or dusting the handrails in the corridors. When she was first there, she would pack her stuff to leave every day then sit by the door, hoping to escape. But the admin lady gave her a notebook and pen and asked her to keep a record of all the people who came and went. Mum loved doing that! Well - mostly she didn't do it but she liked thinking she was doing it...

Hi everyone. I've been caring for my mum for the last 2 years. She developed Alzheimer's in her early sixties and has recently gone into a dementia care home as she needs support 24/7.On the whole it's been great for her but with 1 big issue. She's a good 10 to 20 years younger than the other residents and is generally physically fit. The home gets her outside as much as possible, but its hard matching activities for her with the capabilities of the other residents.
Any advice on what we can do? Are there homes specifically for younger people with Alzheimer's?
We're in Hyde, East of Manchester - is there any support locally?
Thanks, Steve
Hi,

There is a chance, it is a hard route but are you RPR for your Mum under the DOLS authorisation?
Check the conditions of the DOLS, there may be extra ones written by the Best Interest Assessor which determine that your mum should have activities related to her age or some kind of outdoor activity.
This is a legal obligation that the care home should meet and you can challenge this as RPR.
If you get nowhere or there isn't anything specific, or you aren't RPR, you could ask social services for a review of your mum's care on the grounds that her needs aren't fully met under the Care Act. If you manage to get a review you can highlight the meaningful activity issue for your mum, who is still physically fit.
This will work if there are clear signs that your mum is struggling without these activities, they are need based.
Is she asking to go out a lot? Is she saying she needs to go to places? Did she used to do certain things that she no longer can because of living in a care home that would be meaningful to her still? Does she display any behaviour that would indicate she wasn't happy.

You have more weight with the DOLS authorisation conditions but the review of care is still worth a shot.
 

Thedeckking

New member
Aug 31, 2020
2
0
Eogz, thanks for the info. I get the gist of what you're saying but what are DOLS and RPR?
Mum's had a social worker assigned in August (her previous one has been off work for over a year) but I've not been able to get hold of them so she's never actually met a social worker.
 

Eogz

Registered User
Sep 9, 2021
21
0
No problem, the RPR is a relevant persons representative under a DOLS authorisation.
You would need a DOLS if you had lack capacity and live in a care home or are in hospital for a long time.
This would be because the home has a locked front door or they wouldn't let your mum leave without someone being with her.
If this sounds right she should legally be on a DOLS authorisation.
I'm guessing she may not be, it might be worth asking the home if they have applied for one.
Your mum might not have an active social worker, but you can ask for a review of her needs by calling social services.
Hope that helps. 😁