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PHONE OFF THE HOOK

nitram

Registered User
Apr 6, 2011
25,087
0
North Manchester
Great suggestions above...

Another thought is to go retro! You can buy old style telephones with either a dial or push buttons and the old curly wire attaching the receiver to the big bit. Perhaps the curly wire would stir enough old memories that he'd put the receiver back properly?
A wall mounted one without convenient surface nearby to put the handset on could help
Either something like >>>this<<< or a >>>retro one<<< with cradle and either dial or push button.

Dial type may not work with BT Digital Voice without a pulse to tone convertor, e.g. >>>this<<<, other VoIP ATAs (analogue telephone adaptor) may work.
 
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Pantherapaws

Registered User
May 12, 2022
12
0
Thanks everyone.. I managed to contact the landlord today who went down and finally Dad called me - big relief.
It seems that thunderstorms have affected his cordless phone in the dining room (and I must admit, this is the second time this has happened though I didn't even think of this yesterday) and that's why the phone was ringing but he wasn't answering because the storm had affected the socketd. So we're back to using his retro corded phone in his bedroom. That's how it's staying for now until we can test the cordless phone when we see him next. Not sure it's worth getting a BT engineer to test the socket and end up charging Dad £85 for the call-out service if Dad can manage with just the one phone in the bedroom. Can't have these cordless phones keep going dead everytime Dad gets a storm.

Thankful that Dad's ok, that's the main thing and communication with him is key. Appreciate the support.
 

nitram

Registered User
Apr 6, 2011
25,087
0
North Manchester
Not sure it's worth getting a BT engineer to test the socket and end up charging Dad £85 for the call-out service


You can test the socket using the retro corded phone, if it does not work it should be possible to get it replaced FOC.

Also try the cordless in the working bedroom socket as the base unit may have been damaged.

The base station provides a good path to earth via the mains and will therefore take the majority of the charge from any lightning strike.
 

try again

Registered User
Jun 21, 2018
441
0
Great suggestions above...

Another thought is to go retro! You can buy old style telephones with either a dial or push buttons and the old curly wire attaching the receiver to the big bit. Perhaps the curly wire would stir enough old memories that he'd put the receiver back properly?
Tried a dial up one for mum. It was a pain to store the numbers and she didn't get the hang of using it.
When we changed phone providers, I got the internet in and then introduced an echo show.
We can now drop in at anytime and mum doesn't need to do anything. If she's not in the living room we can pick up noises from the next room.
Her hearing is now making it hard, though the speakers are good. But we can still just drop in to see her sleeping on the sofa.
 

Pantherapaws

Registered User
May 12, 2022
12
0
You can test the socket using the retro corded phone, if it does not work it should be possible to get it replaced FOC.

Also try the cordless in the working bedroom socket as the base unit may have been damaged.

The base station provides a good path to earth via the mains and will therefore take the majority of the charge from any lightning strike.
Thank you.. we'll test the phones out when we're there next time.
 

Pantherapaws

Registered User
May 12, 2022
12
0
Tried a dial up one for mum. It was a pain to store the numbers and she didn't get the hang of using it.
When we changed phone providers, I got the internet in and then introduced an echo show.
We can now drop in at anytime and mum doesn't need to do anything. If she's not in the living room we can pick up noises from the next room.
Her hearing is now making it hard, though the speakers are good. But we can still just drop in to see her sleeping on the sofa.
Thank you.. hubby and I will have to consider what we may need to discuss with Dad who is generally anti-technology but if he insists on living independently then there's got to be compromises. My concern is his short-term memory and some confusion outside of his normal routine. But anyway, that's for my larger 2nd 'newbie' email once I've got a few other things off my plate this week. Thanks again everyone for your support and suggestions, much appreciated.
 

nitram

Registered User
Apr 6, 2011
25,087
0
North Manchester
@Pantherapaws
I'd assumed that the bedroom socket was an extension and the other one was the master fed by the incoming wire.
Openreach (BT) are only responsible for the master, anything beyond where the incoming wire terminates is the customer's responsibility.

If the master socket is old and looks like
2022-06-08_092902.png

the extension is hard wired and socket belongs to Openreach

If it is a new one with a removable faceplate exposing a test socket with extension wiring not connected to the faceplate Openreach have full responsibility, if extension wiring is connected to the faceplate it is classed as part of the extension and customer's responsibility.
Although a small lightning strike is unlikely to damage the faceplate the test socket is the one to use on any tests.

There is an ever increasing and bewildering array of sockets with test sockets, removing the faceplate will show if extension wiring is attached to it. Only the very early versions had extension wiring not attached to the faceplate, removing the faceplate disconnected the extensions.
https://btbusiness.custhelp.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/15770/~/identifying-your-socket-type .
 
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