Phone call from NH - not good news

jenniferpa

Registered User
Jun 27, 2006
39,448
I'm getting ready to get on a plane to come to England this afternoon, but I've just had a call from the NH saying that Mummy is even worse - she's not really concious, she's on sub-q fluids, taking nothing by mouth, plus she's on anti-biotics and anti-emetics, and had been catheterized. I'll have to evaluate this when I get there but has anyone had any experience with sub-q fluids? My only knowledge of this was when one of my dogs had kidney failure and I had to do this, and with hind-sight, I wish I hadn't since it only prolonged the process (not the same thing I know AT ALL, but perhaps there are similarities?)

Jennifer
 

Canadian Joanne

Volunteer Moderator
Apr 8, 2005
16,242
65
Toronto, Canada
Same experience as you

Hi Jennifer,
For me it was a cat with kidney failure who needed sub-q fluids. As for people, I haven't any personal experience of it.

You will have to evaluate the situation when you get there. It's so difficult getting a straight answer from medical people sometimes. Forgive me for asking, why is she on antibiotics? There does come a time when it is dying that is being prolonged, not life.

I am thinking of you and wish you calmness in this hard time.

Love
 

jenniferpa

Registered User
Jun 27, 2006
39,448
From what I was told, she's on antibiotics for her face (the lesions caused by the shingles and the fact that she's scratched them (actually described to me as gouged)). The precedure in people is called Hypodermoclysis and seems to be used primarily in terminal care to relieve some symptoms. I didn't ask, because I didn't think of it at the time, but I'm wondering if this is being done in order to try and keep her alive until I get there.
 

Skye

Registered User
Aug 29, 2006
17,000
SW Scotland
Hi Jennifer

When my mum had her stroke (at 92), she refused food or drink, and pulled out naso-gastric tubes.

However, she was hydrated via canula, the hospital said that legally they had to keep her hydrated, although from previous posts on here, that may no longer be the case. I refused a PEG for her.

She survived for six weeks on what she got from the canula and the occasional sip of Build-up I was able to get into her. It was agonising to watch.

How lucky that Margaret was able to warn you in time, and you had your flight booked.

'll be thinking of you and your mum. Safe journey.

Love,
 

jenniferpa

Registered User
Jun 27, 2006
39,448
Yes, well, I absoutely DO NOT want this to go on for 6 weeks just to extend life, or rather extend the dying process (my thanks to whoever posted that comment from the doctor - sorry my heads all over the place). On the other hand if it keeps her out of the hospital thats a good thing. I would much ratehr she died in the nursing home than be sent to that wretched place.

Jennifer
 

Tina

Registered User
May 19, 2006
420
Jennifer, sorry to hear your news. Can understand you're all over the place.

Aunty Jean had subcutaneous fluids for a while after her massive haemorrhage last year. She was taken off it at one stage because the docs thought death was imminent but put back on it a few days later because of very strong reactions to tests. It seemed harmless enough as a procedure.

She went on to a nasogastric tube and a PEG because she sort of made progress in that she gained strength and the docs recommended nutrition which was richer in vitamins and minerals etc. and the drip was not enough. They explained to us at the time that the subcutaneous stuff was only for immediate hydration but if there was a chance that the patient required long-term artificial nutrition, a nasogastric tube or a PEG would be the solution.

Thinking of you as you head for England.

Tina
 

DeborahBlythe

Registered User
Dec 1, 2006
9,222
By 'sub q fluids', do you mean what is known as a 'drip'? My mum was put on a drip for a day or two when she went into hospital last year ( March). After a while they removed the drip because they thought she had re-hydrated enough to take fluids by mouth. She wasn't best pleased to be on a drip as she didn't know what the tubing was all about but it seemed to do the trick for her, though of course, me being me, I worried that they had removed it too early.
Hope you have a good flight and safe trip. Thinking of you, Deborah
 

jenniferpa

Registered User
Jun 27, 2006
39,448
Dear Deborah, No, with sub-q fluids they are injected just under the skin. The fluid forms a "bubble" which is then absorbed through the tissue (at least that's how I had to do it for my dog). No need to find a vein or anything.

Dear Tina
Yes from what I've read this is a short-term thing which is why I was wondering if it was being done so that I could get to see her.

Jennifer
 

DeborahBlythe

Registered User
Dec 1, 2006
9,222
Ok, understood, I think. Not a process I have come across (yet). Sorry. We're all wishing you both well and hoping your mum can be made comfortable, wherever she is treated. Love Deborah