Phasing out landlines by 2025: how could this impact people affected by dementia?

LibbyM

New member
Mar 11, 2021
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It sounds as if the carers may have more problems that the person with dementia. My husband hasn't used either phone for months - not even to answer it.
At the moment we are on holiday near a village in Lleyn Peninsula. My smart phone doesn't work for phone calls, and just occasionally for texts. We have to go out to get any connectivity. They'll have to make every part of the UK accessible before this can be rolled out.
 

MartinWL

Registered User
Jun 12, 2020
1,148
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It sounds as if the carers may have more problems that the person with dementia. My husband hasn't used either phone for months - not even to answer it.
At the moment we are on holiday near a village in Lleyn Peninsula. My smart phone doesn't work for phone calls, and just occasionally for texts. We have to go out to get any connectivity. They'll have to make every part of the UK accessible before this can be rolled out.
Oh dear, this thread is littered with misunderstanding. The coverage of the cellular telephone network is, I am afraid, completely irrelevant. Nobody is suggesting using the mobile networks to replace analogue landlines.
 

LibbyM

New member
Mar 11, 2021
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Oh dear, this thread is littered with misunderstanding. The coverage of the cellular telephone network is, I am afraid, completely irrelevant. Nobody is suggesting using the mobile networks to replace analogue landlines.
Then as I said, the carers will have more problem than the cared for - I have no understanding of any of this - it's all gobbledegoop to me.
 

MartinWL

Registered User
Jun 12, 2020
1,148
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I have advice for those who don't understand the technology from those of us who do. Stop worrying. There is nothing to worry about either for carers or the cared-for. This thread has become a debate about nothing!
 

nitram

Registered User
Apr 6, 2011
23,404
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North Manchester
For people only using a phone plugged in a socket something like
openreachNTE5Cfront.jpg

there will be an ATA (analogue telephone adapter) box between the socket and the phone
download.jpg

cisco_ata191k9_2port_analog_telephone_adapter_ac26399.jpg


with power supplied at the right hand side via a mains adapter and the phone plugged into either of the left hand sockets.
There are two phone sockets because with VOIP you can have multiple phones with different numbers and ring tones, some ATAs have a single phone socket.
The CP (communications provider) should do the installation and any setting up of the ATA.
It's an install and forget job that can be done at anytime before the telephone network is switched off.
Just wait until contacted
 

Felixcat1

Registered User
Feb 23, 2021
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I worry that my PWD will not be able to use any type of phone as his dementia progresses. He is already struggling. He keeps dialling wrong numbers but is adamant that he isn’t.
 

MartinWL

Registered User
Jun 12, 2020
1,148
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I worry that my PWD will not be able to use any type of phone as his dementia progresses. He is already struggling. He keeps dialling wrong numbers but is adamant that he isn’t.
There are various designs of special telephones available. My dad has hearing loss and needed a loud phone that didn't require him to press any buttons when he answers it, he couldn't remember which button to press. I found one that could be set to default to amplified volume, and as a bonus had 8 preset buttons for making calls. It has been a big help.
 

Felixcat1

Registered User
Feb 23, 2021
96
0
There are various designs of special telephones available. My dad has hearing loss and needed a loud phone that didn't require him to press any buttons when he answers it, he couldn't remember which button to press. I found one that could be set to default to amplified volume, and as a bonus had 8 preset buttons for making calls. It has been a big help.
Thank you I will look into this