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Personal care in Scotland?

jugglingmum

Registered User
Jan 5, 2014
5,916
Chester
As some of you know I live in England and care for my mum with dementia, my MIL is in Scotland and things are accelerating.

As I understand it personal care in Scotland is free - I might be wrong.

I am unsure what this would cover and how easily and quickly it could be accessed.

It would appear MIL might need some help with taking medication and applying cream to her legs - I think she physically finds it too difficult to apply the cream so doesn't apply it rather than doesn't remember - not sure on medication as to the issue.

I didn't know if these came under personal care, or how easy this is to access - I assume it needs an SS assessment - or would a GP be able to arrange/confirm it is needed - I think the GP is probably on board and supportive.

We are a 3.5 hour drive away but from what we can tell support is needed fairly quickly, and can be self funded - don't want to suggest this if it isn't that workable.
 

Izzy

Volunteer Moderator
Aug 31, 2003
63,025
69
Dundee
Both my mum and Bill had free personal care as part of their care package at home. They were assessed by the Social Work Department and we had what was then called Direct Payments, this is now called Self Directed Support. They had to make a contribution for the elements which would be classed as social care but the personal care was free. The carers showered them and helped with toileting etc as well as giving their medication. As far as I know this can’t be arranged by the GP and the assessment is by the SW department.

There is a downloadable leaflet about it on the Alzheimer’s Scotland website -


It might be useful to give the Alz Scot helpline a ring. They’re open 24/7 and I’m sure they will be able to answer your questions.
 

jugglingmum

Registered User
Jan 5, 2014
5,916
Chester
Thanks both. Things have been moving forward and a distant cousin L ( I think she is a cousin might be a family friend) has arranged mornings carers for medication/applying cream and dressing with MILs reluctant agreement.

Cousin L is a retired Dr who worked in palliative care. I queried personal care payments and her thoughts were that on a good day MIL would be able to persuade social workers that she didn't need any help with personal care so it might backfire if this route was taken.
 

marionq

Registered User
Apr 24, 2013
6,154
Scotland
The carers know only too well that clients try to fob them off. On the whole they’re pretty good at coaxing, cajoling etc. They will do washing, dressing, helping the person to breakfast. Because I did a lot myself for my husband they would ask me if I wanted other things doing as I saved them time. All in all their help was good.

I’ve just remembered that it was the GP who phoned SS and asked them to arrange it which they did after coming to see us.
 

jugglingmum

Registered User
Jan 5, 2014
5,916
Chester
I don't think there are any anticipated issues with the carers - it is that MIL appears very capable and would not likely get assessed by SS for care at this stage.

MIL is a retired GP/A & E registrar and is a SW spoke to her in the wrong way MIL would demand she left the house.

There is no dementia diagnosis, although that is clearly in play and it is taking cunning persuasion to get her to accept any help.
 

Thethirdmrsc

Registered User
Apr 4, 2018
221
I have had brilliant help from our local council, I get 3 visits a week for my OH, at the wrong times, but they are putting it out to a private company eventually, but all funded by the government. I have even gotten help with equipment for the house. Cannot fault it, all free.
 

Ruth1974

Registered User
Dec 26, 2018
112
As some of you know I live in England and care for my mum with dementia, my MIL is in Scotland and things are accelerating.

As I understand it personal care in Scotland is free - I might be wrong.

I am unsure what this would cover and how easily and quickly it could be accessed.

It would appear MIL might need some help with taking medication and applying cream to her legs - I think she physically finds it too difficult to apply the cream so doesn't apply it rather than doesn't remember - not sure on medication as to the issue.

I didn't know if these came under personal care, or how easy this is to access - I assume it needs an SS assessment - or would a GP be able to arrange/confirm it is needed - I think the GP is probably on board and supportive.

We are a 3.5 hour drive away but from what we can tell support is needed fairly quickly, and can be self funded - don't want to suggest this if it isn't that workable.
Medication is health care and is also free. She would need an assessment from social work but other than that it's quite straightforward . If its medication rather than bathing etc maybe the district nurse could do it? Talk to social work
 

jugglingmum

Registered User
Jan 5, 2014
5,916
Chester
Thanks - but we are 3.5 hours away.

The distant cousin helping thinks that getting social work involved might rock the boat more than help at this stage, MIL can be fierce and single minded when she wants to, and she will be self funding for a decade so the risk of upsetting things isn't worth the financial gain for now.