pedestrian road safety

CLEMENTINA

Registered User
Jun 14, 2014
18
My husband was diagnosed 2 years ago.

He has not deteriorated that much in the time but my main concern for him is that he is impatient when crossing roads. He always was anyhow, but he had the judgment and speed to be able to get across without causing undue braking and possible danger to oncoming vehicles. Now his judgment is impaired and I can't allow him out on his own. He still knows his way around but I am constantly worried and find it difficult to stop him crossing at silly places and going out when it will soon be dark.

We are near 2 busy A roads, and I can't persuade him to stay nearer home where he can walk on only footpaths and very minor roads. The walking is wonderful, and what he lives for, and is the best quality time we have together, but 2 worries are that he goes out when I'm not watching, and causes a traffic accident, or that he will trip and fall somewhere off the beaten track.

Has anyone experience of a tracker device? I do have a carer walking once a week, to give me a break, and sometimes friends and family can be prevailed on. He is not interested in walking with a group (impatience again)
 

Beate

Registered User
May 21, 2014
11,830
London
I doubt that a tracker will do much for road safety. I think the only thing would be for him to have accompanied walks. Maybe you can increase the times a carer can go out with him? Whenever I'm out with OH I have to hold onto him or he'll try to cross a road unsafely.

Obviously, if you are worried about him wandering off, contact social services. They could refer you to telecare who could provide you with a tracker and/or door alarm.
 

AlsoConfused

Registered User
Sep 17, 2010
1,953
Lots of sympathy.

Is it realistic for you to do much about changing where your husband walks and the time of day when he walks please? Might he agree to a walk that involves a bus or car journey to a safe walking area for example? If he walks to exhaustion when and where he's safe to do so, your husband might be less prone to walking around your "boring" home area, near those busy roads. You'll probably need to recruit more one to one walking companions for him ... but maybe the local rambling clubs might provide a few volunteers?
 

CLEMENTINA

Registered User
Jun 14, 2014
18
Lots of sympathy.

Thank you AlsoConfused!

I find myself a bit blinkered, and I had discounted the idea of walking and rambling clubs, but it never entered my head to just contact them to see if there would be anyone who might be willing to do one to one walking....As my son's lovely partner says (about many suggestions I have previously discounted): "Isn't it worth a try?" Your suggestion is now down on my "to do" list! All the best with your own situation. Clementina
 

CLEMENTINA

Registered User
Jun 14, 2014
18
Yes, I think you're right about the tracker not making him any safer.

I have budgeted for four hours a week for a walker which works very well. I have what seems to be a good system that our local Carer's Resource put in place along with social services, where he carries a card, and I carry a keyfob, with immediate contact details in case I get waylaid in some way.

At the moment I just revolve around watching for signs of an impending walk, and I do have some quite devious ways to deter unaccompanied walks such as shoes that he needs help putting on, and by holding onto the door key (I'm not locking him in, but so far he is as careful as ever about locking up, so probably wouldn't go off walking and leave the house unlocked when the Key isn't available to him). It's a bit of a balance between having him cross and frustrated at this, and the peace of mind these tactics give me. Thanks for your reply. You have obviously had similar problems. Clementina
 

pamann

Registered User
Oct 28, 2013
2,635
Kent
Hello Clementina, l had the same problem with my OH, he had a habit of walking in the road even when l was with him, would just run across the road not able to judge the speed of traffic, he then started walking around peoples gardens, the police were called several times by frightened ladies with a strange man in there garden. Sometimes he would be gone for 2 or 3hrs, such a worry for me, neighbours and friends would often see him, and bring him home as he was lost and could not find his way home. Crossroads were very good they would take him out twice a week, then he refused to go with them, as they wouldn't walk far enough for him. For his safety, and other peoples he is now in a CH. He did have a tracker, but refused to take it with him, saying he didn't need it. Sorry l do not know how to help you, only to keep him in, which l know is impossible.
 

DMac

Registered User
Jul 18, 2015
535
Surrey, UK
Just a thought, could you get some fluorescent/ reflective strips and attach these to his outdoor clothing? At leat that way he would be more visible to traffic, especially in these gloomy winter months.
 

Countryboy

Registered User
Mar 17, 2005
1,431
Cornwall
Hi just reading your thread sorry to hear your husbands has problems , however on T.P we often have threads making reference to a person with Dementia having the ability to drive and majority of replies will say No they shouldn't , surly this is the same for a person with dementia walking along the roads they could be putting lives in danger , personally before using our Roads everyone should know the High Way Code , back in the 1940’s & 50’s we were taught the High way Code at school and there was only 10% of the cars on our roads compared the today “Only my view”