1. Expert Q&A: Protecting a person with dementia from financial abuse - Weds 26 June, 3:30-4:30 pm

    Financial abuse can have serious consequences for a person with dementia. Find out how to protect a person with dementia from financial abuse.

    Sam, our Knowledge Officer (Legal and Welfare Rights) is our expert on this topic. She will be here to answer your questions on Wednesday 26 June between 3:30 - 4:30 pm.

    You can either post questions >here< or email them to us at talkingpoint@alzheimers.org.uk and we'll answer as many as we can on the day.

  1. Kath TN

    Kath TN Registered User

    May 5, 2006
    32
    Hello - Happy New Year to all! I've not posted for a while - the last few weeks have been horrendous! Dad was admitted to hospital between Christmas and New Year - extreme paranoia that has escalated massively over the last four weeks (he has Parkinsons as well as Vascular Dementia - paranoia has been diagnosed as Parkinson's related), going walkabout from rest home, fears for his and my life, can't sleep, eat or relax, etc. He has also become profoundly incontinent - hospital are testing for UTI - apparently this can affect the brain. Has anybody else eber heard of this? Worried sick. Also - while in hospital does dad cease to be entitled to DLA - not sure about this one but I'm sure that one (at least) of you wonderful people will know!!:)
     
  2. jenniferpa

    jenniferpa Volunteer Moderator

    Jun 27, 2006
    39,419
    Any infection in the elderly can cause an increase in dementia. UTI's tend to get mentioned most because unlike in younger people, the elderly can often have a UTI without the "normal" obvious symptoms (e.g. pain, urgency etc). If your father's getting DLA he must be under 65, otherwise it's AA. However, both of them stop after 28 days in hospital (excluding the admit and discharge days). If he's really getting DLA, and has a motability agreement, the mobility component will still be paid. If he doesn't have such an agreement, after 28 days the mobility compenent may be cut to the lower level.

    Jennifer
     
  3. connie

    connie Registered User

    Mar 7, 2004
    9,519
    Frinton-on-Sea
    Hello Kath, sorry to read about your current problems with dad. Have not heard about the link between UTI's and the brain, but realise that they can cause so, so many problems.

    Re DLA, you will need to inform SS/DWP ? that dad has been admitted to hospital. As I recall DLA is stopped after a certain period, if all care is being paid for. Sending hugs,
     
  4. Áine

    Áine Registered User

    hi Kath, yes, definately, any infection in elderly people can lead to confusion. .... and not just for people with dementia. years ago, before my dad had any problem with dementia, he had scabies (and for reasons known only to himself he didn't do anything about and didn't see a doctor until he was in a real mess with it) and went quite off his head. the GP didn't know what it was and sent dad into hospital. dad was wandering around the ward in the night, talking about the japanese coming to get him. scared me half to death. everyone saying he'd never cope living on his own again etc. once they'd treated the infection he was right as ninepence ....... lived perfectly happily and independently for another 5 years.
     
  5. MrsP

    MrsP Registered User

    Mar 19, 2005
    115
    Hi Kath

    Just to back up what has been said already; I've seen many people who have 'acute on chronic' confusion, or indeed acute confusional states (don't think that's terribly PC but that's what the Doctors call it) with no previous symptoms who end up diagnosed with a Urinary Tract Infection- it's just the body's reaction to infection and toxins, and once the infection is under control the signs and symptoms disappear.

    Regards, kate x.
     
  6. Lila13

    Lila13 Registered User

    Feb 24, 2006
    1,342
    Yes, when my mother had a UTI the doctors thought that might be the cause of her confusion. But she was still confused (though not so acutely) when they'd cleared it up with antibiotics.

    Lila
     
  7. Kath TN

    Kath TN Registered User

    May 5, 2006
    32
    Thank you all for your replies - sorry for not responding earlier. The last few weeks have been horrendous! UTI has been ruled out but the paranoia is getting worse. Dad is still in hospital - waiting for MRI to see if there's a bleed on the brain - failing that it will be diagnosed as Parkinson's related paranoia. If they treat that then the phsical affects of Parkinson's will get worse. No win situation! Struggling at the moment. Have notified DLA about Dad's hospitalisation. Hospital ward he is in is horrible and I hate visiting him there but have been told it is the only place for him! The rest of the family hate the ward and keep asking me why I've put him there and what I'm going to do about it. I don't know what to do about it because he really needs to be there. Sorry to moan but I'm feeling really stressed at the moment - can't stop worrying about my poor dad.
     
  8. connie

    connie Registered User

    Mar 7, 2004
    9,519
    Frinton-on-Sea
    Kath, dear Kath, don't quite know what to say to you.

    You seem to be on top of the situation, but nobody seems to be there for you.
    No advice, just love and hugs,
     
  9. connie

    connie Registered User

    Mar 7, 2004
    9,519
    Frinton-on-Sea
    Am trying to send you a hug here............
     

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  10. Grannie G

    Grannie G Volunteer Moderator

    Apr 3, 2006
    68,718
    Kent
    Dear Kath, I`m so sorry about your father and even more sorry for you, that you have to put up with criticisms from the family. It`s so typical that the one who takes all the responsibility is given even more hassle instead of being supported.
    Keep posting and get as much support as you can from everyone here. We understand. Love Sylvia x
     

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