Panorama. Monday 8.30 BBC

Skye

Registered User
Aug 29, 2006
17,000
SW Scotland
Katie, I believe it's called netiquette! It's common to all forums (fora? :D)

Using caps is the equivalent of shouting, and is generally discouraged.
 
1

117katie

Guest
I don't give a d.......... as we used to say about netiquette, but if the appearance of my posts is more important than the content, then ... ?????

Netiquette went out of the window years and years and years ago, unless I am mistaken. We all decided there and then that the internet was ours and what we chose to do with is was our decision.

Forgive me if I am wrong, but schoolchildren these days ... and even undergraduates at University .. are allowed to pass exams by using TEXT-SPEAK. So why should I refrain from using my own means of communication? I thought this forum was all about FREEDOM and SPEECH and ACCESS and EQUALITY and DISABILITY and SUPPORT and .... Sorry, there I go again, using capital letters which come as easily to me as a trained touch typist as language comes to those trained linguists, or even design to those trained designers.

I would not dream of commenting on the spelling of those people who cannot spell as you or I would choose to spell, nor on thier chosen sentence-structure, so if I decide to use capital letters, or bold letters, or red, or blue or green letters ... then how does that diminish the content of whatever I submit.

If those things are of prime importance to each and every post, then please delete all those posts that do not comply with the rules.

katie
 
1

117katie

Guest
forgot to mention

..... THAT MY SIGNATURE ON TP IS

PAINT YOUR LIFE WITH COLOURS

CHOSEN BECAUSE I ONCE MET A SEVERELY DISABLED PERSON WHO HAD NO MOBILITY, NO SPEECH, NO ABILITY TO LIVE THE LIFE THAT EACH OF US WOULD CHOOSE TO LIVE, AND HE SAID TO ME, IN HIS CHOSEN FASHION:

PAINT YOUR LIFE WITH COLOURS.

miniscule katie
 

germain

Registered User
Jul 7, 2007
342
Netiquette

Hello Skye & Brucie,

Well you learn something new every day ! I didn't know capitals was shouting either ( but possibly if I had known I would have used them a lot more often with some of the things that have happened to my Mum ) - I haven't got any grandkids so I've got no-one to teach me this new fangled electric thingy stuff - Please don't give the fairly old new girl lines if I make a mistake !

Sorry for the flipancy (sp?) -but Brucie I'm afraid you did make me laugh. So - on a proper serious note - if I ever try to underline or bold something the u and the brackets seem to appear in my post. Do you know why ? and is there a thread anywhere explaining how to use the TP system a bit better ?
( and sorry for going PC technical on a critical thread)
regards
germain
 
1

117katie

Guest
Dear Germain

I did know that using capitals was called SHOUTING but I didn't know that it was forbidden within the confines of a forum where I thought that what we were all doing was SHOUTING AND TRYING TO BE HEARD.

I will continue to shout loud for that which I care about, and Dear Germain, please read the reasons in my last post for my signature, which is PAINT YOUR LIFE WITH COLOURS.
 

daughter

Registered User
Mar 16, 2005
824
Just my opinion but:

TOO MANY CAPITAL LETTERS DETRACT FROM THE POINT OF USING THEM: THEY LOSE THEIR EFFECT AFTER A WHILE!
but if the appearance of my posts is more important than the content, then ... ?????
Perhaps this could be applied to the Panorama programme?

i.e. if the appearance of the programme is more important than the content, then ... ?????

Like most things in life, if you wait for perfection to arrive, you will end up empty-handed. :)
 

Skye

Registered User
Aug 29, 2006
17,000
SW Scotland
1

117katie

Guest
coontent wins every single time

exactly

if appearance is more important than content as in the programme in question then why do we all bother

please note i am trying to whisper very quietly and am using no punctuation whatsoever which i will endeavour to do from now on

katie
 
1

117katie

Guest
sorry skye i will not be reading any tutorials about whether or not i should use capital letters or punctuation of any kind of red and blue and yellow and green purple and orange and all the colours of the rainbow

bet im older than you

katie
 

cynron

Registered User
Sep 26, 2005
429
east sussex
how old?

Katie
You say you are likely to be older than Hazel,So why dont you show it and post something worthwhile again instead of posting a lot of trivia?
 

Grannie G

Volunteer Moderator
Apr 3, 2006
70,717
Kent
Katie, you are obviously very angry.

Well please don`t be angry with TP members. We are all carers, some of us 24/7 carers, many of us with dissatisfactions about the system that is supposed to care for our nearest and dearest, a system that has many shortcomings.

Some of us don`t have the strength to get up in the morning, never mind fight this system, and certainly the majority of us don`t wish to fight with other members.

If you have the strength and energy, may I suggest you spend it constructively. We are all entitled to our views, whether or not you think them outdated and if your desire to fight for better conditions for those in need is as altruistic as you profess, then make a start, and if it`s as good as you would like to think it is, we`ll all join the queue to support you.
 

Margarita

Registered User
Feb 17, 2006
10,824
london
I would not dream of commenting on the spelling of those people who cannot spell as you or I would choose to spell, nor on thier chosen sentence-structure, so if I decide to use capital letters





Those people who cannot spell or they chosen sentence-structure, can come under learning disability .

Forgive me if I am wrong, but schoolchildren these days ... and even undergraduates at University .. are allowed to pass exams by using TEXT-SPEAK.
yes only if they have a Severe learning disability

you come across as having no consideration or respect for other people feeling in how they perceive the caps lock on , as I even younger then you ,still perceive it as offensive and written in an angry manner ,


if you have a passion for what you believe in go into the '' Raising awareness and campaigning section ''

This section is for '' Support for people with dementia and their carers ''
 

cynron

Registered User
Sep 26, 2005
429
east sussex
Well said

Magarita.

I could not have put it better myself,i think you speak for many of us on this particular forum, well done.

Cynthia
 

Norman

Registered User
Oct 9, 2003
4,348
Birmingham Hades
I am older than dirt.
I really do not care in what format posts are made.
I do not care if there are spelling mistakes.
I do not care if there are grammatical errors.
As long as I can understand the post ,and am able to help in some way that is what matters.
Norman
 

zonkjonk

Registered User
Mar 1, 2007
290
Melbourne, Australia
I watched the panorama doc.
my mum is/was (not sure) on anti psychotics (and anti depressives, and anti constipation, and pain killers now upped to morphine)
she is now bed ridden, catheratised, and on palliative care only
I thought her rapid decline was due to the AD, not the drugs
when my mum was pacing the halls and crying out "somebody help me"
I thought the drugs were the best and only available option to help
anything to ease her aggitation and suffering.
was I wrong to not question this?
in the end, it is terminal, why should we question drugs that help "quality of life"
If they advance the end of life, is this so bad, after all, quality of life has long since gone.
 

Skye

Registered User
Aug 29, 2006
17,000
SW Scotland
anything to ease her aggitation and suffering.
was I wrong to not question this?
in the end, it is terminal, why should we question drugs that help "quality of life"
If they advance the end of life, is this so bad, after all, quality of life has long since gone.

A good point, Jo.

There comes a time for some sufferers when behavioural techniques don't work, however hard we try. AD is a progressive and terminal illness, and anything that eases the patient's suffering is valid, IMHO. After all, no-one would deny cancer sufferers pain relief, and that also can hasten death.

Of course, it's wrong if NHs are using the drugs just to make life easier for themselves, and I'm sure that can happen. But if there is a good reason for the drugs to be prescribed, and there is no viable alternative, then I don't see the problem.
 

jenniferpa

Registered User
Jun 27, 2006
39,448
I've been mulling this over since the programme.I think the focus on one person's medical history combined with Clive Ballards research has left many viewers with the idea that prescribing anti-psychotics to elderly dementia sufferers is never a good idea, but I don't think that that is either true, or the programme's intent. The two doctors took issue with Eric's prescriptions for one primary reason - he had never showed signs of psychosis, at least by their definition. However, there are many people who suffer from dementia who do display signs of psychosis (hallucinations and delusions for example). For them, anti-psychotics may be the only option. However, one of the things I have found while reading round the subject is that there is some evidence to suggest that such psychosis may be a stage which eventually disappears with or without treatment, although it may return at a later stage. So anti-psychotics may be useful for a short period of time. Unfortunately though, and this does not just apply to these medications, once someone is on a medication, doctors are inclined to keep on prescribing it, without ever considering if it is still necessary.

My feeling are summed up as follows. Anti-psychotics should only be prescribed for psychosis, not for their sedative effects. Anti-psychotics should only be prescribed for short periods of time. Medication should not be prescribed until the psychosis has shown itself to be resistant to non-medical intervention.

None of this is new - this is how it's SUPPOSED to work. It's a question of enforcing the guidelines that altready exist, hence the need for training both for caregivers and doctors. You almost (and I say almost, because exceptions will always occur) need a system that says anti-psychotics may not be prescribed until the symptoms have been present for a month (which is the basic guideline when the drugs are prescribed for non-dementia sufferers with psychotic symtoms). That would have 2 advantages. 1) It would force improved training, since these people would need to be managed during that time and 2) it may be that for many people the psychotic symtoms will dissipate.

This really only applies to care homes though. I very much doubt that a dementia sufferer living in their own home with a family caregiver gets anti-psychotic meds within a month, or several months for that matter. So family caregivers have to muddle through, using whatever support they can find to manage the situation.
 

Ashburton

Registered User
Feb 19, 2007
99
This really only applies to care homes though. I very much doubt that a dementia sufferer living in their own home with a family caregiver gets anti-psychotic meds within a month, or several months for that matter. So family caregivers have to muddle through, using whatever support they can find to manage the situation.

We did. My mum was initially put on a high dose of Valium and within a few weeks was on Solian and Lorizapan(think these are anti-psychotic), looking back now, I really think the high dose of valium had a very negative effect on my mum and has her the way she is now, but thats only my opinion. Suppose we will never know.
 

jenniferpa

Registered User
Jun 27, 2006
39,448
I don't think lorazepam is a classic anti-psychotic - it's a benzodiazepine tranquiliser in the same class as the Valium. Solian is though.

My point in distinguishing between care at home and care in a nursing home is that I have a sense that family carers wait until the symptoms are far worse, and of far longer duration than do "professional" carers. In other words, they've tried the "behaviour modification" approach to the best of their ability and knowledge before a doctor ever gets involved.

I wouldn't be surprised if the Valium did have a detrimental effect. My mother was on temazepam for several years in ever increasing dosages for insomnia prior to her strokes. When she came out of hospital after those (and coming off these addictive drugs cold turkey) I gave her one (she had been taking 3) one night when she couldn't settle - and oh boy, never again. Also, having taken valium before surgery myself, I can definitely say that it slows you down intellectually.
 

Ashburton

Registered User
Feb 19, 2007
99
.

I wouldn't be surprised if the Valium did have a detrimental effect. My mother was on temazepam for several years in ever increasing dosages for insomnia prior to her strokes. When she came out of hospital after those (and coming off these addictive drugs cold turkey) I gave her one (she had been taking 3) one night when she couldn't settle - and oh boy, never again. Also, having taken valium before surgery myself, I can definitely say that it slows you down intellectually.


When my mum was in hospital when she first got diagnosed she was put on a low dose of valium. Looking back now and what I know about Valium I am very very angry that she was. While she was on it she did slow down, she came off it after a month and returned to normal.

Recently went on a high dose for a few weeks and to me has never recovered, of course it could be just the progress of ad, diagnosed in March 2003, but I do wonder.