1. Kate P

    Kate P Registered User

    Jul 6, 2007
    565
    Merseyside
    Well, I'm saying panic attacks but I don't know if it is.

    When mum is aggitated she starts panting - I know it's a horrible term but that's exactly what it is. She doesn't do anything else just sits and pants.

    When she's angry she generally become aggressive and throws things and stomps about which is why I'm not sire it's a panic attack.

    She's on anti psychotics now but the consultant said the dose was too high because she fell asleep eating dinner but this level of aggitation can't be good for her can it?

    Has anyone experienced anything like this?

    My dad's really worried that she's going to give herself a heart attack or something - he nearly crashed the car today he was getting that worked up himself.
     
  2. jenniferpa

    jenniferpa Volunteer Moderator

    Jun 27, 2006
    39,439
    #2 jenniferpa, Dec 6, 2007
    Last edited: Dec 6, 2007
    Are there any triggers at all Kate that you're aware of? How long do these epsiodes last? I think the primary danger of hyperventilation is loss of conciousness due to breathing out too much carbon dioxide (that's why you're supposed to breath into a paper bag if you start to hyperventilate). It sounds very odd. Has it been mentioned to the doctor?

    Edited to add::

    Another question - would you call it deep or shallow? Because if it's shallow the term for it is Tachypnea.
     
  3. steve54

    steve54 Registered User

    Nov 30, 2007
    41
    Leicester/Nottingham
    Kate

    My Mum sometimes has panic attacks which take the form you describe. They usually don't last very long but can be triggered by a fear of being alone at night. Mum does get very weepy, we had a call tonight when she was in tears. It's very difficult and I can't really give you a solution. I'm new to this as Mum was only recently diagnosed with vascular dementia. But since I have been a member of TP I have received tremendous support and advice. I'm sorry this isn't really a solution but keep talking to people; we are all listening. I find it helps to know someone is listening who understands what you are going through.
     
  4. Kate P

    Kate P Registered User

    Jul 6, 2007
    565
    Merseyside
    Thanks guys.

    It is shallow breathing and it can go on for several hours. I think dad did mention it to the consultant which is why we now have the anti-psychotics.

    I can't think of anything that seems to be starting it although it's difficult to gage mum's moods because she can't speak at all so its possible she's aggitated about something that's happening but I can't think what.

    Yesterday she was just sat in my house with dad and we were having a cup fo tea. She didn't seem particularly bothered about being there - when she doesn't want to be somewhere we know about it - coats on and she starts throwing her handbag.

    I'm really quite puzzled.
     
  5. alfjess

    alfjess Registered User

    Jul 10, 2006
    1,213
    south lanarkshire
    Hi Kate

    Is your Mum in any discomfort, eg constipated, headache, cold, feet sore?

    My Mum was like this and worse, with my mum it was contiuous, the hospital is giving her parecetomol, just in case she is in any pain and laxitive, because she was constipated.

    Sorry to say though, unless she is very much sedated, she is still agitated.

    Hope you can find a reason for your Mum's agitation

    Alfjess
     
  6. jenniferpa

    jenniferpa Volunteer Moderator

    Jun 27, 2006
    39,439
    Hmm - has she been checked for things like heart problems? The problem with dementia is that I think we (families and medical professionals) tend to assume anything slightly odd is due to the dementia, and I don't think that's always the case. I mention heart problems as an example because 1) if you look up shallow, rapid breathing that's what tends to come up and 2) (and please don't be offended by this) I have seen this once before and the underlying problem was a heart condition BUT (and this is why offence might be taken) that was one of my dogs. Anxiety as a cause of rapid shallow breathing seems to come fairly low down on the list - it's hyperventilation (rapid DEEP breathing) that seems to be mostly caused by anxiety, but it is ON the list, so it could be that.

    Still I think I'd want to hear a convincing explanation for this being something suitably treated with anti-psychotics. I know there's been a lot of stuff about how anti-psychotics are bad, but I really, really do think they have a place in treatment when there IS psychosis. And of course, it's quite possible that your mother has more classic psychotic symptoms as well, in which case seeing if this problem can be treated in this way (i.e. with one drug rather than many) makes sense.
     
  7. Kate P

    Kate P Registered User

    Jul 6, 2007
    565
    Merseyside
    Alfjess - I don't know if mum has any of those things - I can't see any sign of illness but again with things like headaches and stuff it's hard to know because she can't tell us.

    Jennifer - I'm not at all offended - you should know by now it takes a lot more than that to offend me!

    I think you're quite right I think we do have a tendancy to put everything down to her dementia. I'll have to watch myself for that.

    Anyway, I'll get dad to take her to the GP for a check up. I know that originally the consultant wanted mum to have valium but mum said no and dad said if mum didn't want it she didn't have to have it, hence the anti-pyschotics. I don't know that they're really working though - the consultant told dad not to give them to her everyday because she'd become addicted so just to give them when she's aggitated. Well, that's everyday and so he's giving them to her everyday but we still have the panting and she doesn't seem any less aggitated at all to me.

    It's just so unhelpful that our consultant knows nothing about FTD - she said she's only ever heard of three other people who've had it. She also said something to dad about mum eventually ending up in Stephensons House (??) which is attached to the hospital - unfortunately I wasn't with him when this got said because I don't understand why she would have to be in the hospital and couldn't go into a normal nursing home - could it be because of her age? She's just turned 60?

    I'm sorry I seem to be asking more questions all the time but we seem to have reached a point where we're getting no help and we don't really know what's going on.
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.