1. Expert Q&A: Living well as a carer - Thurs 29 August, 3-4pm

    As a carer for a person living with dementia, the needs of the person you care for will often come before your own. You may experience a range of difficult emotions and you may not have the time to do all the things you need to do. Caring can have a big impact on both your mental and physical health, as well as your overall wellbeing.

    Angelo, our Knowledge Officer (Wellbeing) is our expert on this topic. He will be here to answer your questions on Thursday 29 August between 3-4pm.

    You can either post questions >here< or email them to us at talkingpoint@alzheimers.org.uk and we'll answer as many as we can on the day.

Our demntia choir Vicky McClure

Discussion in 'Dementia-related news and campaigns' started by jane0600, May 1, 2019.

  1. jane0600

    jane0600 Registered User

    Oct 3, 2013
    2
    please watch this tomorrow on bbc1 at 8pm
    (2 may and the 9th May )
     
  2. Izzy

    Izzy Volunteer Moderator

    Aug 31, 2003
    59,252
    Female
    Dundee
  3. Sirena

    Sirena Registered User

    Feb 27, 2018
    1,414
    Female
    Vicky was talking about this earlier on Radio 2, she sounds lovely and was quite knowledgeable about dementia.
     
  4. nae sporran

    nae sporran Volunteer Host

    Oct 29, 2014
    5,728
    Male
    Bristol
    Very emotional programme, they didnt hide from dementia being incurable and people forgetting they sang in the choir. The possibility of using the study of the singer's brainwaves and how they respond to music to understand the disease better was a positive.
     
  5. AliceA

    AliceA Registered User

    May 27, 2016
    2,252
    I thought so too, some sad cases too but they were brave. The young couple were amazing.
     
  6. Izzy

    Izzy Volunteer Moderator

    Aug 31, 2003
    59,252
    Female
    Dundee
    I found it interesting too. Especially the science/ research. I’m hoping that something lasting came out of the BBC involvement. I suppose we will find that out after next programme.

    Our choir for people with dementia and carers/friends has been going for over 5 years now. It’s the highlight of the week for all of us. We see ourselves as our ‘choir family’. Many members (including my husband) have passed away and some have gone into care over the 5 years. Those have been replaced by members newly diagnosed. Members who have most someone (like me) now come as volunteers and supporters and we go from strength to strength. We have a concert on 15th June and as always everyone will rise to the occasion.
     
  7. Grannie G

    Grannie G Volunteer Moderator

    Apr 3, 2006
    69,133
    Kent
    I felt very emotional watching the programme.
     
  8. Izzy

    Izzy Volunteer Moderator

    Aug 31, 2003
    59,252
    Female
    Dundee
    I did. Mainly beacause I could see Bill in many of those taking part. It took me back of our times singing together. Also thinking of what is ahead for all those involved in the choir in the programme.
     
  9. Grannie G

    Grannie G Volunteer Moderator

    Apr 3, 2006
    69,133
    Kent
    What was so amazing for me was how open they all were about dementia.

    We were never able to discuss it. It was as if I was the only one who knew Dhiren had dementia. He knew something was wrong, he knew he was ill when he was well enough to understand he was ill, but there was never any open discussion or even acknowledgement dementia was the cause of our troubles.
     
  10. Izzy

    Izzy Volunteer Moderator

    Aug 31, 2003
    59,252
    Female
    Dundee
    Yes they were very open. I find a lot of our choir members will talk about their own diagnosis - those who can still communicate in that way. Some of the people in the choir programme were very young.
     
  11. Bunpoots

    Bunpoots Registered User

    Apr 1, 2016
    2,835
    Nottinghamshire
    There was a high percentage of younger people with dementia. I was expecting to see more elderly ones. I'm glad they chose a lot who were younger because I think that it adds emphasis to the fact that it is a disease and not just a normal part of ageing.

    I found parts of it very upsetting. I really feel for those people. One lady has a daughter the same age as mine and her mum still healthy. I really found myself empathising with that family and the young family too.
     
  12. Helly68

    Helly68 Registered User

    Mar 12, 2018
    371
    It looked lovely, but I just couldn't watch it. There was a similar documentary on Sky Arts about the country singer, Glenn Campbell, (he of "Rhinestone Cowboy") doing his last tour as he had dementia and they knew he wouldn't be able to perform again. Surrounded by his very supportive family band and fans, many of whom knew his diagnosis, cheering him on. So emotional. I cried and cried. I can only watch this sometimes as I have to keep the feelings at bay.
    Probably not very healthy, but you have to keep calm and carry on.....
     
  13. Sirena

    Sirena Registered User

    Feb 27, 2018
    1,414
    Female
    It has had brilliant reviews but like Helly I am not sure if I can watch it.
     
  14. TEUP

    TEUP New member

    Sep 27, 2017
    3
    I found the programme very moving and upsetting . My mother is end stage . This is a stage that not many people see on TV , in fact I have never seen it , maybe because it is to harrowing ? Mum has had vascular dementia for over 5 years maybe longer when we look back at things ? She is bed bound now and doesn't know us,
    I'm glad its being talked about more
     
  15. Cat27

    Cat27 Volunteer Moderator

    Feb 27, 2015
    10,070
    Merseyside
    Welcome to TP @TEUP.

    I’ve recorded it to watch when I feel strong enough.
     
  16. rhubarbtree

    rhubarbtree Registered User

    Jan 7, 2015
    462
    North West
    Lots of dementia in the news.

    The dementia choir was a very moving programme with everyone in host/hostess mode. Only we would know the effort that had gone into getting the PWD up and ready to face the day.

    The upsetting part for me was when the choir sang on stage for the first time. The PWDs looked carefree and happy then it panned round to carers/supporters who looked - well - how I feel most of the time, weepy and exhausted.

    Vicky MClure was a wonderful presenter and brought out the best in everyone. However, I do have reservations about this type of publicity for dementia because it does not tell the whole story. I will now have people telling me all I need to do is take OH to a choir. Quite a few years ago after another programme, people said I needed to put a curtain over the front door (leaving the house never been a problem here).

    The boating programme with Pru and Tim also paints a rose coloured image. Afraid I sit there looking for the places where they have cut the film and had her do a voice over to make everything appear serene. Not that she needs a script - wonderful memory for Shakespeare etc.

    Barbara Windor's husband and the Eastenders team did well in the marathon but he had to explain that she would not have been able to cope with being at the finish line. He does so well acknowledging her illness but not going into too much detail. He keeps the image alive - as we all try to do.

    Have rambled on a bit there - apologies - but I am looking forward to the next programme.
     
  17. myss

    myss Registered User

    Jan 14, 2018
    336
    I watched it this on Thursday night and on a whole it was an enlightening programme and look forward to the next episode..
    I was touched by the plight of the young couple where the ex-drummer husband has dementia and was wondering if his former profession had anything to do with it.
    But most of all it was nice to see those who took part appear to get something out of it. It would be interesting to find out if the choir members and their families/carers regularly get to meet others with dementia as I felt this linking with others in the same position as themselves was half of that enjoyment - like I get from reading/contributing to TP.

    Now, that said, I was slightly disappointed by one point that's sort-of mentioned in these posts:

    I think I heard the presenter Vicky had asked for people of all stages of dementia to join the choir and what I mostly saw was people who seem to be at the earliest stages where forgetfulness and bad moods seem to be the only or main traits of the illness - like my dad about 4-5 years ago. I couldn't help feel that viewers without personal experience may think that's all dementia is about. I had hoped to see choir members attempting to wander off, sudden mood changes or hear tales of toilet or mobility issues. But I may be asking too much from just one episode..

    And as rhubardtree predicted, I already have had two people telling me about getting my dad into music/a choir and one of them was from abroad!!
     
  18. captainscarlet

    captainscarlet Registered User

    Feb 4, 2016
    23
    coventry
    Coventrys choir/singing for the brain lost another member this week .My mothers visits were the highlight of the week , singing songs from way back when. Wearing a badge of happiness and security, with her new family. A family that continues to grow and grow , so much so we believe that we have the largest group in the uk. We are incredibly fortunate to have the singer/actor Dave willetts , star of many west end productions. Just as important for my mother having a new sense of belonging , are the wonderful friendships that carers get from sharing their stories and snippets of advice. These last beyond the words of the songs. The songs sung will echo forever in the hearts and minds of the carers and their families and just for that moment the darkness is lifted and light pours onto the traveller taking the dementia journey.
     
  19. Izzy

    Izzy Volunteer Moderator

    Aug 31, 2003
    59,252
    Female
    Dundee
    How wonderful. Your experience echoes mine. My husband sang in our choir until the week before he died. He no longer communicated in speech but he still sang the songs at choir. Sometimes a tear would fall when he was singing. Such an emotional e oeruence. How marvellous that you have your actor supporting you. Our choir has diminished this year due to people either going into care or passing away. We're on a recruitment drive now. The fellowship within our choir family is beyond price. Wishing you and your choir family continued success.
     
  20. Grannie G

    Grannie G Volunteer Moderator

    Apr 3, 2006
    69,133
    Kent
    Fantastic experiences for both of you @captainscarlet and @Izzy.

    I know how much music means to me and meant to my husband so really can appreciate your gratitude for these singing groups.
     

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