1. rummy

    rummy Registered User

    Jul 15, 2005
    700
    Oklahoma,USA
    I've been trying to accumulate as much information from the internet, professionals, books and those with experience that I can get. Seems like all I have learned indicates that putting someone with AD into a nursing facility is eventually inevitable. I would like to know from you all if this your experience and understanding or if there those who manage to keep their loved ones home to the end of this disease?
     
  2. Canadian Joanne

    Canadian Joanne Volunteer Moderator

    Apr 8, 2005
    15,991
    Toronto, Canada
    We had to put my mother in a facility. I think a few people are successful in keeping someone with AD at home. I think a lot would depend on how the AD patient is affected (aggression etc) and also how much help a carer would be getting. If a carer is getting lots of help (paid or otherwise) he or she may be able to keep their loved one at home. And I think not having financial worries would really be necessary. Money can be very useful.
     
  3. rummy

    rummy Registered User

    Jul 15, 2005
    700
    Oklahoma,USA
    We are aiming to keep her at her home or ours as long as possible but know that we need to plan as if she will eventually go into one. In the US you have to be destitute or have long term care insurance to put them in one and not worry about it eatting up their estate. After that is gone, I really am not sure how it will be afforded.
    Does AD ultimately leave everyone that has it in the same physical state in their last years? And does that usually mean they need full time nursing care?
     
  4. Sandy

    Sandy Registered User

    Mar 23, 2005
    6,847
    Hi Rummy,

    The Alzheimer's Society has a fact sheet that discusses the later stages of AD which you can find here:

    http://www.alzheimers.org.uk/Facts_about_dementia/How_dementia_progresses/info_later.htm

    Factors which often play some part in a person with AD's declining health are decreased mobility and decreased ability to swallow. Problems swallowing can result in food/drink entering the respiratory track which greatly increases the risk of things like pneumonia.

    I think your "twin track approach" (hope to keep her at home as long as possible, look ahead into the issues related to care homes) is a very good one.

    The situation regarding what the government pays for vs. the individual is quite different in the US compared to the UK (I say this as an American who has lived in the UK for 15 years). I was recently listening to an attorney who has a call-in program here in California (we are visiting my family at the moment) and was answering questions on this very topic. I would suggest that you try and find a lawyer who specialises in "elder law" who can suggest various legal options to shelter as much of your mother's estate as possible , while still giving you and her the best choices in care options should they become necessary.

    Take care,

    Sandy
     

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