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Not sure what to call this.

TNJJ

Registered User
May 7, 2019
1,937
0
cornwall
Hi. I spoke to and emailed the doctor about dads catheter infection being back. He came up to see him and we had a chat.
I also spoke to him on the phone about how dad is progressing.Also is he due to go onto palliative care. Apparently not! Although they are not providing any more medication unless he is in pain. Apparently they are going to keep him comfortable and try and maintain some sort of quality of life. A balancing act if you will... We are on the same page there. A lot of dad’s medication has stopped working so we are on the bare minimum there.He hasn’t referred him to the palliative care team as he isn’t there yet.. But all this to me is palliative care.I have to keep in touch with them but basically there is nothing more to be done. They are not going to increase his Bisoprolol to 10 mg as apparently that is for people who can live a long life. Dad is 88 in June.
 

Duggies-girl

Registered User
Sep 6, 2017
2,494
0
@TNJJ Dad was on palliative care after he was diagnosed with cancer in 2018 It meant that he could have anything to keep him comfortable and pain free but no chemo of course as it would probably have made him ill and in the words of his consultant 'was likely to do more harm than good' I agreed with this.

Yes it's a balancing act, dad had pneumonia and a hospital stay for treatment with antibiotics and also a couple of units of blood. These were things that he would benefit from and would make him feel better and he did. He also had a stroke and there was talk of blood thinners but as he was at risk of bleeding from his tumour it was decided to leave him be. He lived anther two years with just palliative care and had a good quality of life apart from the last few weeks.

Dads maintenance tablets were stopped some months before he died, I can't remember them all but his statins and PSA drug went first as his consultant said they were long term drugs and would no longer help him. She also said that she no longer needed to see him which I was thankful for because getting him to the hospital was a bit of an ordeal.

I would say that your dad is already on palliative care. No more interference but anything to keep him comfortable and pain free is the same thing. I was also able to keep in touch in case of emergencies but basically there was nothing else they could do for dad. My greatest fear at this time was dad having a fall and breaking something which would have been awful.
 

TNJJ

Registered User
May 7, 2019
1,937
0
cornwall
@TNJJ Dad was on palliative care after he was diagnosed with cancer in 2018 It meant that he could have anything to keep him comfortable and pain free but no chemo of course as it would probably have made him ill and in the words of his consultant 'was likely to do more harm than good' I agreed with this.

Yes it's a balancing act, dad had pneumonia and a hospital stay for treatment with antibiotics and also a couple of units of blood. These were things that he would benefit from and would make him feel better and he did. He also had a stroke and there was talk of blood thinners but as he was at risk of bleeding from his tumour it was decided to leave him be. He lived anther two years with just palliative care and had a good quality of life apart from the last few weeks.

Dads maintenance tablets were stopped some months before he died, I can't remember them all but his statins and PSA drug went first as his consultant said they were long term drugs and would no longer help him. She also said that she no longer needed to see him which I was thankful for because getting him to the hospital was a bit of an ordeal.

I would say that your dad is already on palliative care. No more interference but anything to keep him comfortable and pain free is the same thing. I was also able to keep in touch in case of emergencies but basically there was nothing else they could do for dad. My greatest fear at this time was dad having a fall and breaking something which would have been awful.
@@Duggies-girl. I agree. I always understood that this was palliative care. The doctor maybe thinks I was thinking of end of life but not so.. It can get confusing to say the least.
 
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