1. Nutsysmum

    Nutsysmum New member

    Jun 26, 2019
    2
    Mum had alz and has just been diagnosed with cancer. Dad at exactly same time diagnosed Vascular dementia.

    Advised to find a care home for both.

    This is tricky enough, but all are concerned that Mum hasn't a LPA. Dad has with us girls as attorneys. Mum was too far before dad accepted her condition.

    The care homes are worried that mum hasn't got LPA. She is social services funded and doctors doing the chc as we speak.

    Why are care homes concerned and more importantly, who has the power over mum? Us or who?
     
  2. Beate

    Beate Registered User

    May 21, 2014
    11,550
    Female
    London
    Without an LPA no one really.
    You can however still apply for deputyship, although this is quite expensive and onerous.
     
  3. canary

    canary Registered User

    Feb 25, 2014
    9,664
    Female
    South coast
    At the moment no one has power over your mum.
    If you cant get LPA, then I really think that you need to get CoP deputyship. If you dont apply, then once they are LA funded the LA will apply, because someone has to have power over finances for both of them.
     
  4. Sirena

    Sirena Registered User

    Feb 27, 2018
    1,359
    Female
    @canary, as the mum is LA funded there isn't much in the way of finances for the CH to worry about though is there? If they want access to her pension there is another way of doing that isn't there - where someone looks after just their DWP dealings, can't remember what it's called? And I thought a deputyship wouldn't be given for health/welfare? Sorry for all the questions, but I know you know a lot about it.
     
  5. canary

    canary Registered User

    Feb 25, 2014
    9,664
    Female
    South coast
    @Sirena - even though the LA will probably be paying care home fees, there will be other things that will need administering (payment for hairdresser, chiropodist etc) and someone will have to sign a contract too.
    You are right that deputyship is only given in very unusual circumstances.

    When it was first decided that mum needed to move to a care home - long before there was any talk of whether she would be LA funded, or not, the LA contacted me to ask whether I was willimg to apply for deputyship, because if I didnt want to then they would start the proceedings straight away.
     
  6. joanne d

    joanne d Registered User

    Feb 9, 2013
    44
    Hi there,
    Both my parents had dementia. My brother had POA for dad but no one for mum. They were both admitted into care within a week of one another. Social Services did a DOLS assessment and spoke to both mum and dad separately to establish if they had capacity. I was present as advocate. It was established that they could not make their own decisions so Social Services made it for them ie It was in their best interests to be admitted into care. At no time did the care home insist on POA. Although it did cause problems with financial management. I was advised to apply for deputyship for my mum to manage her finances but it did not seem like an obstacle regarding their care.
    Sadly they have both since passed away and I am in the process, as executor of getting their affairs in order. I understand POA dies with you so , so far there have not been any issues...
    In my experience social services have no reason to insist on deputyship or POA for the process of care home funding. But then again, every case is different and others may beg to differ?
    Good luck,
    Jo.
     
  7. Shedrech

    Shedrech Volunteer Moderator

    Dec 15, 2012
    7,567
    Yorkshire
    hello @Nutsysmum
    a warm welcome to DTP
    it's tough on you looking out for both your parents

    I wonder whether the nursing home is concerned that Social Services may consider that your mum could live in her own home with a hefty care package in place and so would take steps to move her
    however, given your mum's health issues this seems unlikely
    or that the LA may not agree to pay the full fee
    maybe have a conversation with the hospital SW/discharge officer to find out exactly what is being recommended ... though as you say you have been advised to look into residential care, I assume this is not merely the family's choice it is the LA's also ... the LA must act in your mum's best interests ... and if your mum is fully funded the LA are required to offer at least one placement that they will fully pay for

    you also say your dad is moving into residential care ... if they owned their own home, this may lead to them both being self-funders, unless your mum does qualify for the CHC funding
    https://www.alzheimers.org.uk/get-support/legal-financial/who-pays-care

    you could apply to become your mum's DWP appointee
    https://www.gov.uk/become-appointee-for-someone-claiming-benefits
    and her Deputy for finance
    https://www.gov.uk/become-deputy
     
  8. Sirena

    Sirena Registered User

    Feb 27, 2018
    1,359
    Female
    Ah yes thanks @canary you're right, there will be other bits and pieces as you mention which will need to be paid, although I doubt the CH would be too troubled about £20 a month. I guess it is more about who signs the contract.

    The role I was thinking of is DWP appointee, as linked above by Shedrech.
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.