NHS Cut back on provding Hearing Aids

Discussion in 'Dementia-related news and campaigns' started by jimbo 111, Jan 19, 2016.

  1. jimbo 111

    jimbo 111 Registered User

    Jan 23, 2009
    5,080
    North Bucks
    From my own experience , this news is very disturbing
    I am furious with so many people who get free aids then never use them
    My hearing has gone from mild to severe over several years
    and the aids are completely indispensable
    To read that some authorities are going to issue only one hearing aid is against the advice of the experts
    Whoever is affected by these changes should be aware of the enormous discrepancies in the prices charged for private aids
    I know that I cannot use the names of the companies but I have recently been involved with two high street shops where the price of identical aids has been £3.500 to £1.750 and the service provided almost identical
    I can well understand the claim that deafness /hard of hearing can have other health implications
    jimbo




    Six areas of the UK have decided that they will give out fewer hearing aids
    It means that those currently with hearing aids will have to buy their own in future. Similar devices cost around £2,000 to £3,000.
    Campaign groups say it could have health implications. Studies show that leaving hearing loss untreated can, for example, increase the risk of dementia and depression.
    'A key paper came out a few years ago that found that those with mild hearing loss are twice as likely to develop dementia, those with moderate hearing loss are three times more likely to develop it and those with severe hearing loss are five times more likely to develop dementia,' says Dr Ferguson. 'We know also that hearing loss is associated with poor working memory and reduced cognitive function

    North Staffordshire CCG says its move is not 'financially driven'. And certainly, hearing aids are relatively inexpensive for the NHS to provide, as it can buy in bulk, paying round £90 per hearing aid - considerably less than the £2,000 to 3,000 they cost to buy individually.

    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/a...hearing-loss-cases-without.html#ixzz3xgOD80kq
     
  2. AlsoConfused

    AlsoConfused Registered User

    Sep 17, 2010
    1,953
    Agree with your outrage over this withholding of essential equipment for deaf people. Action on Hearing Loss has been trying to fight it for some time.

    All of us need to hear in order to play a full part in life and in our relationships. Hearing aids aren't the perfect solution for deafness - there isn't one - and a hearing aid which only helps the patient hear in one ear is of marginal value. Deafness afflicts people of all ages, including those whose employment will be ended if they can't hear.
     
  3. fizzie

    fizzie Registered User

    Jul 20, 2011
    2,731
    This is totally outrageous there will be many many people who will suffer as they will be unable to buy aids privately. I'm going to write to AGE UK to see if they will take up a campaign. What about AS starting a campaign - adding deafness to any form of memory loss will multiply the problems hundreds fold

    This is totally unreasonable - lets hit older people AGAIN - this is not a political issue it is a social issue
     
  4. AlsoConfused

    AlsoConfused Registered User

    Sep 17, 2010
    1,953
    Well done fizzie.

    If the big charities all gang up on individual Care Commissioning Groups maybe they'll drop their iniquitous proposals. I can't believe they've really thought through what would be the social, cost and even health consequences of fitting only one £90 hearing aid to people who need 2 hearing aids to hear.

    There are similar cost cutting wheezes going ahead now over cataract operations ... One working eye is enough apparently.
     

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