• All threads and posts regarding Coronavirus COVID-19 can now be found in our new area specifically for Coronavirus COVID-19 discussion.

    You can directly access this area >here<.

NHS CHC funding--who does it go to?

katie1

Registered User
Aug 5, 2014
122
Kendal Cumbria
Hello

This is all a bit new to me. My Dad is about to have the CHC checklist and later the assessment. I am trying to read (and understand??!!) all the documentation relating to this topic.....but there is a lot of it!
Could anyone tell me, if Dad was granted NHS funding later down the line, who does this get paid to? the individual to use as they wish or to the care home they live in?
What happens if they still live at home and they require nursing care, can they remain at home and district type nurses visit and this be paid for from their NHS CHC funding.
If they live in a Care Home that offers high levels of care and 'end of life care' but is not a traditional "nursing" home, can they still receive NHS funding and remain at that care home because moving them from their home at that stage to a Nursing Home would be detrimental to their health and wellbeing----and if someone is eligible for the funding in their own home there shouldn't be any difference!
Can anyone explain this please
I will continue reading through the documents!!
 

geum123

Registered User
May 20, 2009
4,604
Hi Katie,

Just bumping this up because you've not had a response.:)

I'd just like to recommend the following, which I think addresses all issues of NHS Continuing Health, with clarity.
It's a long but easy read, and is written by one of the solicitors who are specialist in this field and wins cases.
It's the best information that I've read on the subject. Very informative.:)

Nhs continuing health care book.
http://www.solicitorsfortheelderly.com/assets/media/NHS_CONTINUING_HEALTHCARE_BOOK_MARCH_2014.pdf
I can only answer in terms of my own experience and that was, when my Dad qualified for NHSCC while in the nursing home the payment was paid direct to the home.
On qualifying for it I was told he would have to be moved, but I fought to keep him there because his needs were managed, solely because the staff had got to know him so well during the preceding four years, and it certainly would have been detrimental to his well being to move him.

I'm sure others will come along with their experiences.
Good luck.:)
 
Last edited:

geum123

Registered User
May 20, 2009
4,604
Woops that's me told. :rolleyes:
Abject apologies nitram.
Thanks for providing the link.:)
 

katie1

Registered User
Aug 5, 2014
122
Kendal Cumbria
geum123

When you said you had to fight to keep your Dad in the home he was in ....who was that with? the home or some other body?what process did you go through in order to be successful? thanks
 

Pete R

Registered User
Jul 26, 2014
2,038
Staffs
geum123

When you said you had to fight to keep your Dad in the home he was in ....who was that with? the home or some other body?what process did you go through in order to be successful? thanks
katie1, there are 2 levels of NHS funding, 3 if you count nothing at all.:( Non of it is means tested but some assessors can be influenced if self funding.

FNC funding is when the NHS acknkowledge that there are some Nursing needs but wont pay for it all. At the moment that is worth £110.89 and is only payable to a Nursing Home to help pay for a Nurse 24 hrs/day.

CHC funding is where the NHS agree to "fully" fund someone's care. This can be at home, in a Care Home or a Nursing Home. On review this funding can be withdrawn and often is.

However "fully" does not always mean that and in my area they will fund up to £660/week. If the home your loved one is in costs more than that the NHS may want them moved to somewhere cheaper and then the battle starts to prove that any move would be detrimental for the person.

You are not supposed to be able to top up CHC but here are certain circumstances where you can get away with it.

To get CHC you have to fully immerse yourself in research to understand the DST or try to employ some professional to help you in the process.

Good luck and I wish you well.:)
 

missmarple

Registered User
Jan 14, 2013
204
Hi Katie if someone qualifies for NHS CHC that should apply wherever they are are home or in residential care. My Dad lives at home with all day carers, residential care was not possible for him and so he is in receipt of CHC which pays for his carers. Initially a person usually only qualifies for 3 months then gets a review and if they qualify again it is awarded for another year. I am yet to get to the bottom of what exactly the CCG will pay for though. Dad requires a lot of outings as he is very restless and I was told the CCG will not pay for petrol, meals taken while out of the house. Although in the guidelines it states food costs should be paid for. But personally I'm just relieved the carers fees are being met for now.
Good luck, it is quite alot to get one's head round, read the relevant governement papers re CHc that are available onlin and keep posting.
 

geum123

Registered User
May 20, 2009
4,604
Hi Katie,
In Wales, its the Health Board who undertake DST assessments.
By rights Dad should have been in an EMI nursing home, but the one I visited was not good, so I asked that he remain where he was, which was the nursing home he was first placed.

Four years later, once he was found eligible using the DST, I was told that he would have to be moved presumably to the EMI nursing home.
I was already in contact with a solicitor who was handling his NHSCHC case retrospectively, and she offered to write to them stating it wasn't in his best interests.

I also used presented evidence by piecing together statements made during the DST from the nursing staff and the mental health team. ( example: the nursing home staff were only able to interpret my Dads needs because they were used to him.)
An internal meeting was conducted by the mental health team, who agreed it would be detrimental to his health and that evidence, was presented to the Health board who then agreed that he should not be moved.

I had also read and probably have stated in the past, that NHSCHC should be provided in any setting,
however if you look at page 49 of the above guide I think that is more in-line with how things are done in reality.
 

katie1

Registered User
Aug 5, 2014
122
Kendal Cumbria
Since I wrote the initial post above when we were about to go to the meeting for the CHC checklist we had to cancel. Unfortunately that morning Dad collapsed at home, he wasn't breathing properly, he was grey, we called an ambulance, the rapid response team came and did CPR and put on a chest monitor etc and then the ambulance came as he eventually came round and he was taken to hospital. He spent the next two days in a very agitated state but has since calmed down a bit and has been moved to another ward. They are so short staffed that they are using security men to monitor/follow/keep an eye on him because he wanders/walks/paces all over the ward and corridor
I have asked where we are with assessments for the CHC and what funding he will receive.
I was told that he now seems well enough to be discharged! I refused and said that Mum could not and would not be able to cope at home and anyway he is in HOSPITAL with close SUPERVISION to keep him and OTHERS safe! if he is challenged he will push past others no matter how frail they are or if they are in a wheel chair. He picks and pulls at any wounds or cannular/wires etc he would sit in anyones wheelchair etc
He could have another cerebral episode (this was agreed by the nurse in charge) and therefore he needs NURSING which they are providing at the moment so they should not be discharging him to somewhere that does not provide what they are providing at present!!!
So what assessments should he be receiving?
 

missmarple

Registered User
Jan 14, 2013
204
Hi your Dad sounds similar to mine and I managed to get CHC for him on the basis that he needs care throughout the day otherwise he wanders and get sinot dangerous situations and has a track record of aggression (long story but he is a widower so there is no one around for daily care and he failed residential admission due to behaviour issues)
The hospital probably won't have any record of any CHC process having been started in the community. they will wan to discharge him ASAP because of bed pressures. As far as they are concerned if he is currently safe to be discharged, no matter what might happen in the future, they will want to discharge.Ask for a CHC assessment while in hospital. Ask to be present as the CCG will try not to award and you need to prepare well and present evidence of need. If it just does not happen the fact that security guards are required to manage him is excellent evidence to present to the CCG when the assessment happens at home.
 

tre

Registered User
Sep 23, 2008
1,353
Herts
Our support group meeting had a speaker last week who managed to obtain CHC funding for both her parents who had dementia. You can find out more about this at www.caretobedifferent.co.uk . This may answer some of your questions
Tre
 

SueShell

Registered User
Sep 13, 2012
395
Orpington
Hello

This is all a bit new to me. My Dad is about to have the CHC checklist and later the assessment. I am trying to read (and understand??!!) all the documentation relating to this topic.....but there is a lot of it!
Could anyone tell me, if Dad was granted NHS funding later down the line, who does this get paid to? the individual to use as they wish or to the care home they live in?
What happens if they still live at home and they require nursing care, can they remain at home and district type nurses visit and this be paid for from their NHS CHC funding.
If they live in a Care Home that offers high levels of care and 'end of life care' but is not a traditional "nursing" home, can they still receive NHS funding and remain at that care home because moving them from their home at that stage to a Nursing Home would be detrimental to their health and wellbeing----and if someone is eligible for the funding in their own home there shouldn't be any difference!
Can anyone explain this please
I will continue reading through the documents!!
If he gets full CHC funding it goes straight to the care home he's in. If he just gets nursing CHC funding which is now £112 a week it too goes direct to the care home. However if he is still living in his own home it pays for his nursing care.)
 

Pete R

Registered User
Jul 26, 2014
2,038
Staffs
If he gets full CHC funding it goes straight to the care home he's in. If he just gets nursing CHC funding which is now £112 a week it too goes direct to the care home. However if he is still living in his own home it pays for his nursing care.)
You are correct the FNC part has gone up to £112/week but it is only payable direct to a Nursing Home. It cannot be paid to cover Nursing care in the persons own home.
 

nitram

Registered User
Apr 6, 2011
20,079
North Manchester
If he just gets nursing CHC funding which is now £112 a week it too goes direct to the care home. However if he is still living in his own home it pays for his nursing care.)

FNC is only payable in a residential nursing environment, not in the person's own home.