1. Expert Q&A: Benefits - Weds 23 October, 3-4pm

    Our next expert Q&A will be on the topic of benefits. It will be hosted by Lauren from our Knowledge Services team. She'll be answering your questions on Wednesday 23 October between 3-4pm.

    You can either post your question >here< or email them to us at talkingpoint@alzheimers.org.uk and we'll be happy to ask them on your behalf.

  1. rufus

    rufus Registered User

    Oct 26, 2006
    4
    Tennessee
    #1 rufus, Oct 26, 2006
    Last edited: Oct 26, 2006
    My mother has battled severe depression most of her life, now I am afraid she has AD and it is absolutely breaking my heart because I have always wanted to finally see her happy and able to enjoy some of her life. Initally, the doctors just thought she had psuedo dementia from depression or maybe her medication. Oh how I wished that were the case. Her mother had AD begining at age 62 and battled it for over 15 years. My mother cared for her mother and has always made the comment that she hoped it never happened to her. That really gets to me.

    This has come upon her quickly and seems to be progressing rapidly every month. She is only 57. I have read many of your threads about your experiences and it has helped explain some of the things that are going on with her that the doctors either failed to metion or do not think is part of the disease. One in particular being, incontinence. My mother all of the sudden has lost control of her bladder. This is not an all day thing but maybe 1, 2, maybe 3 times daily.

    She intially started out being very disoriented, seemed to be slow at comprehending some conversations, not being able to distinquish a joke from a true statement, unable to remember taking her medicene. Some days her speech is very sluggish and she can't seem to get the right words out.

    In 3 mos. she is now repeating phrases over and over and cannot bath herself. She gets really moody and agitated at times with no recolection of her mood shift, she calls me over and over thoughout the day telling me the same thing each time, sometimes 1- 2 minutes apart. She still knows everyone but can only relate to people she has known for a long time. If her grandchildren are in the room she no longer acknowledges them. On some occassions she will say hi to them or make loving comments briefly and and few minutes later she no longer acknowledges them even when they are stading in front of her and talking to her. Its very sad to see but we all understand its not her

    She has lots of obsessions, preoccupied with smoking, getting food into her teeth. She will only eat soup because she is terrified of getting anything in her teeth. We have to watch how much she liquid she drinks at one time. One night she drank an entire gallon of tea not realizing it and begain vomiting afterwards. I now wonder now how much time we actually have with her. It came on so fast and is progressing even quicker.

    The diagnosis is not yet conclusive but, I am with her daily and have not dought in my mind that she does have AD. What are your thoughts?
     
  2. MrsP

    MrsP Registered User

    Mar 19, 2005
    115
    Hi Rufus,

    I'm not in a position to make a judgement on a diagnosis but I just wanted to say that my thoughts are with you; having such a dramatic change in such a short time must be very hard for you to see, especially regarding the grandchildren. Hope your doctor comes up with some help soon. Take care and keep strong, Katex.
     
  3. rufus

    rufus Registered User

    Oct 26, 2006
    4
    Tennessee
    Thanks Katex. It was great to receive your response. I'll let you know.

    rufus
     
  4. Lynne

    Lynne Registered User

    Jun 3, 2005
    3,433
    Suffolk,England
    Hi Rufus

    I'm so sorry your mother continues to experience troubled health, and for the distress it causes to all the family members, especially those little ones who may be too young to understand. It's tough enough for adults to come to terms with this 'invisible' illness, for kiddies it must seem so strange, and yet sometimes they can be very 'accepting' without having to understand, other than that Nanny is not feeling well.
    I'm sure almost everyone reading your post will know what you are going through, and feel for you.

    Best wishes
     
  5. connie

    connie Registered User

    Mar 7, 2004
    9,519
    Frinton-on-Sea
    Hi Rufus, no solutions I'm afraid, but welcome to TP.

    You are truely among friens here, who will listen, and help when they can.
    Sometimes it helps just to know you are not alone.
     
  6. rufus

    rufus Registered User

    Oct 26, 2006
    4
    Tennessee
    Thank you so much Lynne. I agree that even very young children have a sense that something is just not right and do not take it personally. Its seems as though they have adapted to the situation very quickly. (smart babies) They never cease to amaze me.
     
  7. rufus

    rufus Registered User

    Oct 26, 2006
    4
    Tennessee
    Yes, I do feel that I am among very strong and compassionate people. I have read about your experiences with your husband. You are a very strong wonderful person who has great love for him. You are in my prayers.
     
  8. Jilly88

    Jilly88 Registered User

    Aug 11, 2006
    39
    Margate, Kent.
    [ We have to watch how much she liquid she drinks at one time. One night she drank an entire gallon of tea not realizing it and begain vomiting afterwards. ]




    I have the same problem with my Aunt Eunice. She drinks and drinks and drinks, one cup of tea after another... she's even gulping it down and in the middle of a cup of tea, she wants more. I'm trying to cut it down, but if she doesn't get, she screams blue murder! She wil continue to scream and scream and scream. I feel like beating my head against a brick wall. She coninually calls me, minute after minute and I just can;t get on with any work in the house at all. When I explain that the washing up won't do itself, she tells me to get a servant! I despair!.
    Love
    Jilly
     
  9. zed

    zed Registered User

    Jul 25, 2005
    76
    London
    Hi Rufus

    Obviously we here can't make a diagnosis, but her symptoms do seem to match dementia.

    One of the tradegies of dementia is how hard it is to diagnose. A couple of years ago, we were told by a doctor that she definitely didn't have AD. They said it might be pseudo-dementia, which I was really pleased about as it could be treated. But then the doctor said it was Pick's disease (frontal lobe dementia) then they said vascular dementia, and finally, 2 years later, her new doctor now says AD!

    It is important to get a diagnosis as then she, and your family, can get the support you need. I have never heard of someone with depression losing control of their bladder, but it is quite common with dementia.
     
  10. noelphobic

    noelphobic Registered User

    Feb 24, 2006
    3,452
    Liverpool
    I have never heard of pseudo-dementia. Do you have more info on this please? It's not that I think for a moment that my mum has it, just interested as never heard of it before.
     
  11. noelphobic

    noelphobic Registered User

    Feb 24, 2006
    3,452
    Liverpool
    Off my trolley

    Actually, I've just done a quick google and I think I've got it! I did lose my trolley in Tesco's today and wandered around with someone elses for ages! Mine finally materialised miles from where I think I left it but no one ever did claim the one I had! Maybe they had pseudo dementia too!
     
  12. Nell

    Nell Registered User

    Aug 9, 2005
    1,170
    Australia
    [QUOTE=noelphobic]Actually, I've just done a quick google and I think I've got it! I did lose my trolley in Tesco's today and wandered around with someone elses for ages! Mine finally materialised miles from where I think I left it but no one ever did claim the one I had! Maybe they had pseudo dementia too![/QUOTE]

    Oh Noelphobic! Thanks! What a hoot!:D
    Recently my sister photocopied my Dad's death certificate for all the various organisations who seem to require a copy and put the original and photocopies in her trolley. Shortly afterwards she found the trolley missing! In a panic she scuttled arounbd until she located someone else pushing it along. When my sister explained, the woman said "Ohhh, I'm sooo sorry! . . . . . But. . . . WHERE'S MINE???!!!!" Poor woman was last seen desperately looking for her trolley!!
    Your post reminded me of all this. I think there is a lot of pseudo-dementia going on - especially in my house!!
    Nell
     

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