1. Expert Q&A: Protecting a person with dementia from financial abuse - Weds 26 June, 3:30-4:30 pm

    Financial abuse can have serious consequences for a person with dementia. Find out how to protect a person with dementia from financial abuse.

    Sam, our Knowledge Officer (Legal and Welfare Rights) is our expert on this topic. She will be here to answer your questions on Wednesday 26 June between 3:30 - 4:30 pm.

    You can either post questions >here< or email them to us at talkingpoint@alzheimers.org.uk and we'll answer as many as we can on the day.

  1. Faith34

    Faith34 Registered User

    Jan 28, 2016
    3
    Hi there
    Am hoping this forum will give me some inspiration, strength, courage. In the future, I hope that I can supply to others.
    My dad has vascular dementia (also a shunt for normal pressure hydrocephalus) - he's been living with us for 18 months - he's deteriorated greatly since Christmas. He's not had a shower for over 5 weeks as always not up to it ... does this mean it's time to get carers in?
    Thank you.
     
  2. Cat27

    Cat27 Volunteer Moderator

    Feb 27, 2015
    9,765
    Merseyside
  3. Izzy

    Izzy Volunteer Moderator

    Aug 31, 2003
    58,719
    Female
    Dundee
  4. 2jays

    2jays Registered User

    Jun 4, 2010
    11,478
    West Midlands
    Always a good idea to get carers in, even if they only chat. The sooner someone gets used to others being in the house, the less likely it's going to be really hard to do so if a crisis happens

    Welcome from me too :) xxxxx


    Sent from my iPhone using Talking Point
     
  5. balloo

    balloo Registered User

    Sep 21, 2013
    227
    northamptonshire
    why would get carers in we have been looking after MIL f0r 3 years and has Vascular dementia and from day 1 I had to supervise bath and now we have a bath lift and have one every day MIL went through not wanting one is was because she did not feel safe on her own getting in and out the bath lift is a god send.
    carers are £20/ hr where we are and as we had to sell her house she would have to pay. attendance allowance does not go far buying incontence pants now
     
  6. AnneED

    AnneED Registered User

    Feb 19, 2012
    81
    East Yorkshire UK
    Hi,

    Hope you find the forum useful, many of us do.

    I guess the answer to your question is, it depends.

    If you are finding it too hard to manage your dad without help, yes, try assistance from care staff.
    If your dad needs more than one person to move him around or manage him, then, again yes.
    If you are hoping that care staff will be able to manage to get him to do what you can't do, then I'd say it depends. There are skilled carers who are very accustomed to dementia and can be very good with their carees; but there are also people who aren't very good with dementia and sometimes it is so hard, it's difficult for anyone to make progress with an issue.

    I'd encourage you to have a look at the stuff signposted as it can help you to short cut towards a better understanding of what works generally. Most posts on the forum get some sort of answer from someone who knows about a particular issue from their own situation so I'm sure you'll find it useful generally and it's certainly supportive.

    If your dad is more likely to agree to have a bath, some hospices have baths 'with technology' and if they have a dementia day or times when dementia patients are welcome they might be able to help out with this.

    My criteria with mum and showers are: does she smell? If not I don't worry too much.
     

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