1. Expert Q&A: Protecting a person with dementia from financial abuse - Weds 26 June, 3:30-4:30 pm

    Financial abuse can have serious consequences for a person with dementia. Find out how to protect a person with dementia from financial abuse.

    Sam, our Knowledge Officer (Legal and Welfare Rights) is our expert on this topic. She will be here to answer your questions on Wednesday 26 June between 3:30 - 4:30 pm.

    You can either post questions >here< or email them to us at talkingpoint@alzheimers.org.uk and we'll answer as many as we can on the day.

  1. michelle h

    michelle h Registered User

    Mar 24, 2007
    3
    Hi All,

    My grandma has been diagnosed with AD this week. For a long time she has been on anti depressants and we have thought thats what was wrong. After looking at threads on this site everything has just clicked into place.After visiting her today i felt i could cope with her better just because it now has a name what is wrong with her.
    At present the current fascination is money!! her handbag must open and close at least thirty times an hour where she is looking for her purse, then she says she has no money even though there is a wad there then the purse disappears then the tears come and then the anger and this is an everlasting circle that goes on all day.
    her interest in reading the radio or tv has disappeared and she spends a lot of the time saying she wishes someone would take her(as in god) this is really upsetting. I was wondering if there was anything I could do to help her enjoy something and keep her occupied?
    A
     
  2. alfjess

    alfjess Registered User

    Jul 10, 2006
    1,213
    south lanarkshire
    Hi Michelle

    Are Social Services involved? If not get them involved

    They are your pathway to Daycare (your Grandma may enjoy the company and the activities) and also home carers.

    You may have to push SS hard, before you get the package of care that suits your Grandma. Persevere!

    Another thing to consider is Enduring Power of Attorney, If it hasn't already been done, try to get it

    Let us know how you are getting on.

    Alfjess
     
  3. michelle h

    michelle h Registered User

    Mar 24, 2007
    3
    thanks for replying.
    my aunty takes care of the money side of things.
    Social services became involved when she was taken to hospital before christmas due to her diabetes(nipping to the shops each day and eating mars bars!!)
    SS then arranged for carers to come at teatime to make her tea etc as there is usually someone else there during the day and her sister lives next door and hels out a lot.
    The carer came for a month then she refused to have them anymore.
    She has refused any help and would definately not go to a day centre.
    She will not entertain any help from any one outside the family.
    She has four children who all work and go as often as possible but she thinks that one of them should go and live with her because that is what she wants but this is an impossible option!
     
  4. jenniferpa

    jenniferpa Volunteer Moderator

    Jun 27, 2006
    39,417
    I sometimes think this should be called the "selfish disease". People who would never ever have considered sacrificing their children for their own benefit suddenly become about as self-centered as the most demanding prima-donna. I suppose when the entire world seems to be falling apart around you it's inevitable, but it sure doesn't make it easier to deal with. My mother spends much of her time sleeping now, but when she's awake she does want to be entertained, very much in the way a small child would. Unfortunately, not much engages her attention, so one's caught between a rock and a hard place.

    Jennifer
     
  5. Skye

    Skye Registered User

    Aug 29, 2006
    17,000
    SW Scotland
    Hi Michelle

    It's very hard to keep them entertained, their attention span is so short. Whatever yo try to do, you will be constantly interrupted by the money checks.

    That's fairly normal, by the way. As they lose the ability to understand money, they seem to keep the realisation that it is important, and mustn't be lost. My husband is the same. He hasn't handled money for years, but still worries about how he is going to pay for his lunch at day care.

    Do you have old family photos? I have found that this is one interest that never fails. As John does not remember much from one session to the next, we keep going over them and talking about the people.

    He also like looking at art books, and will talk about what he sees in the paintings. In other words, visual stimulation rather than verbal, but that is probably because John's main problems are verbal. It's worth a try.

    I'm sure others will have other suggestions for you. Good luck,

    Love,
     

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