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New to all of this. . .

dunnicam

Registered User
Jul 22, 2013
8
0
Hi
Just wanted a bit of advice, this may sound daft, but mum was diagnosed with alzheimers a year ago, although there had been problems for a fair few years, but the doc said she was fine for a woman of her age, 80 +.
Long story short, mum had blackouts about 20 years ago and was given carbamezapeine, which controlled them, then they re-started about a year ago and she was prescribed it again, however, when she was taking it, along with aracept for the dementia, she was really zombied out. Her med for blackouts has been changed and so has she, much more of her old personality is back, she takes more interest in, some things and people and this may sound daft, but it makes me think, is she not actually that bad? It's weird but experience being sparse I'm not 100% sure what we should expect and how her behaviour will change? Does behaviour change quite rapidly - at night, I generally don't get to see her in the evening, I usually go during the day, her behaviour means she won't go to bed, gets quite argumentative/angry and she starts packing and unpacking bags with all sorts from the house.
Also, at what point is it too late to apply for power of attorney? Am I right in thinking that if mum has been diagnosed with alzheimers, then its too late to apply for it?

Sorry if this seems like a stream of consciousness but have only just discovered this site, have been scrabbling round in the dark pretty much trying to sort things between the family.
Thanks in advance for advice given
Anne-Marie
 

Grannie G

Volunteer Moderator
Apr 3, 2006
73,682
0
Kent
Hello Anne-Marie

Your mother is probably `sundowning` in the early evening, packing her bags as a form of restlessness, often intending to return to the home of her childhood.

There is a factsheet about unusual behaviour which includes information about sundowning. I hope it helps you understand.

http://www.alzheimers.org.uk/site/scripts/documents_info.php?documentID=159

As for a Power of Attorney.

When I took one out for my husband, the solicitor made sure my husband understood what he was signing. It was nothing complicated, just that my husband agreed if he had problems or was ill, he was happy for me to make decisions for him.
 

dunnicam

Registered User
Jul 22, 2013
8
0
Hi Grannie G
Thanks for your response.
Had your husband already had a diagnosis of dementia when he signed his Power of Attorney?
I'll have a read of the info sheet.
Thanks

Your mother is probably `sundowning` in the early evening, packing her bags as a form of restlessness, often intending to return to the home of her childhood.

There is a factsheet about unusual behaviour which includes information about sundowning. I hope it helps you understand.

http://www.alzheimers.org.uk/site/scripts/documents_info.php?documentID=159

As for a Power of Attorney.

When I took one out for my husband, the solicitor made sure my husband understood what he was signing. It was nothing complicated, just that my husband agreed if he had problems or was ill, he was happy for me to make decisions for him.
 

Grannie G

Volunteer Moderator
Apr 3, 2006
73,682
0
Kent
Hi Grannie G

Had your husband already had a diagnosis of dementia when he signed his Power of Attorney?

Yes Anne-Marie. My husband had had a diagnosis. It was probably quite a time after diagnosis because although it was advised on Talking Point I knew he wouldn`t agree.
Then someone suggested a Mutual POA which I arranged for both of us.
 

dunnicam

Registered User
Jul 22, 2013
8
0
Yes Anne-Marie. My husband had had a diagnosis. It was probably quite a time after diagnosis because although it was advised on Talking Point I knew he wouldn`t agree.
Then someone suggested a Mutual POA which I arranged for both of us.

So it may be possible to get a POA for mum.
Its so weird because at times, ie today she is so much more with it apart from asking the same things again and again and I think she can't be ready for residential care yet, is this quite common?