1. Expert Q&A: Dementia Research, Tuesday 26th March, 3-4pm

    At Alzheimer's Society our research program focuses on improving care for people with dementia today and finding a cure for tomorrow.

    Hannah from our Research Team will be answering your questions on all our research efforts on Tuesday 26 March between 3-4pm.

    You can either post questions >here< or email them to us at talkingpoint@alzheimers.org.uk and we'll answer as many as we can on the day.

  1. nitram

    nitram Registered User

    Apr 6, 2011
    17,743
    Male
    North Manchester
    Something a bit different, injecting into brain.

    "New Treatment Offers Potentially Promising Results for the Possibility of Slowing, Stopping, or Even Reversing Parkinson's Disease...
    ...

    BBC Documentary
    The trial features in an upcoming two-part documentary series for BBC Two – The Parkinson’s Drug Trial: A Miracle Cure? Episode 1 will air on February 28 at 9:00 PM BST; the second episode will air on March 7 at 9:00 PM BST (subject to TV schedules being confirmed)."

    https://www.journalofparkinsonsdise...ossibility-slowing-stopping-or-even-reversing

    EDIT
    Just checked it's on tonight.
    https://www.tvguide.co.uk/detail/3189436/147627098/the-parkinsons-drug-trial-a-miracle-cure
     
  2. nae sporran

    nae sporran Volunteer Host

    Oct 29, 2014
    5,282
    Male
    Bristol
    One of the leading doctors was on BBC Points West yesterday and it seems fairly positive so far. There was even the prospect of a treatment being more widely available within 4 years, but all dependent on the next stage of testing.
     
  3. nitram

    nitram Registered User

    Apr 6, 2011
    17,743
    Male
    North Manchester
    Yes the results were very positive.
    Only two setbacks, a stroke which was decided to be unrelated and the port not bonding to the skull which could lead to infection, this was rectified.
    All participants, medication and placebo continued with the treatment.
    Part two of the documentary next week

    To make it widely available would require considerable investment.
    MRI and CT scans are taken with the patient under GA to prevent any movement, the results are combined to produce an extremely accurate 3D image of the skull and brain. Under a second GA the head is clamped and under computer guidance 4 tubes are inserted into the brain to the required position, these are connected to a port which is screwed to the skull, there is then a wait while the port fuses to the skull when medication is introduced via the 4 tubes.
    It's not going to happen in the near future.

    I was particularly interesting in it's possible use with LbD
     
  4. nae sporran

    nae sporran Volunteer Host

    Oct 29, 2014
    5,282
    Male
    Bristol
    My Massage Therapist said her friend was offered a place on the trail, but turned it down. Thanks for the insight Nitram, it sounds a bit barbaric at this stage however positive it could be in future.
     
  5. nitram

    nitram Registered User

    Apr 6, 2011
    17,743
    Male
    North Manchester
    Part 2 last night showed the results to not be statistically significant, reanalyses indicated there was hope for future trials. Both Pfeiffer and a charity pulled the funding.
    Both the UK and US authorities would sanction a further trial but no financial sponsors could be found.

    It's 22 years since the treatment was proved to work on cells in a laboratory, this latest trial is the second to have been abandoned.
     

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