New Member needs advice

Discussion in 'I have a partner with dementia' started by alamo, Mar 20, 2015.

  1. alamo

    alamo Registered User

    Jan 2, 2015
    16
    My husband has been diagnosed with Alzheimer three years ago. Things are becoming rather difficult sometimes although the old husband is still there sometimes. Any advice on taking tablets, sometimes he refuses, I take them away and re-issue about ten minutes later. Sometimes this works, sometimes not and sometimes he gets quite aggressive verbally. Any help greatly appreciated.
     
  2. DementiaAction

    DementiaAction Registered User

    Mar 19, 2015
    6
    Hi,

    My Dad sometimes doesn't want to take his tablets but it is actually that he has forgotten how to. I have to put a tablet in his hand and tell him, 'put the tablet in your mouth', whilst miming the action to him. Once he's done it, 'swallow it with the water' whilst miming taking a drink. Can be a very slow process sometimes, but works almost every time. Think subconsciously he wants to take them and knows that they are to help him, which helps the process. If there is an underlying / historical mistrust of medicine might not be the same?
     
  3. blue eyes

    blue eyes Registered User

    Nov 6, 2014
    21
    I feed my husband his tablets from a spoon followed by holding water to his mouth and telling him to swallow.Presently it is working well.
     
  4. pamann

    pamann Registered User

    Oct 28, 2013
    2,635
    Kent
    Hello almo welcome to talking point, l have been with this forum for 2yrs, would not be without it, there is always someone here to help when we need advice, my hubby has had Alheimers for 8yrs, he is now l would say middle to late stages, last week we went to see Dr at the memory clinic, l need some help now as l have coped for too long, he is now taking sleeping tablets, and anti depressants, after 10days l feel l have my hubby back, he is so much better, so don't give up, medication does help, maybe not for everyone, but for me it is good even if only for a little while. Take care
     
  5. esmeralda

    esmeralda Registered User

    Nov 27, 2014
    3,072
    Devon
    Hi Alamo, glad you found this place I'm sure you'll get lots of advice and support. I haven't had this problem with my husband although I do with the dog, I have to crush his up and mash them into cheese before he'll take them. Hope you get more useful advice from other people. very best wishes.
    Es
    x
     
  6. LadyA

    LadyA Registered User

    Oct 19, 2009
    13,545
    Ireland
    Hi Alamo
    My husband is now in the late stages, and in a nursing home, but before he went in I was having the same problem as you - he would just hold tablets in his mouth and not swallow. Or he would just hold it in his hand and refuse to put it in his mouth. His comprehension was completely gone, so he couldn't understand at all. In the end I was advised to crush some and mix with ice cream or mousse, and the capsules, to open them and mix them either with ice cream or a milkshake type drink. But you need to check with the pharmacy as not all tablets are suitable to be administered this way. You could also see if there is a liquid form of the medication available that he might prefer?
     
  7. pamann

    pamann Registered User

    Oct 28, 2013
    2,635
    Kent
    Hello almo you can get some tablets in liquid form, ask your GP then you can put it in juice or water, he won't know then good luck
     
  8. alamo

    alamo Registered User

    Jan 2, 2015
    16
    Many thanks for your advice, much appreciated. Have you come across completely refusing to do anything I suggest. When my husband is in this mode he won't put on the clothes I get out of the wardrobe and when I walk away (I've learnt not to argue but it does get very difficult) he puts two shirts on and leaves his pyjama jacket on the top. When I have a shower he goes wandering inside (I lock all doors leading to outside) and I am constantly on edge wondering what he is doing i.e moving things and shutting doors that should be left open for the cat to visit the litter tray. Any ideas please.
     
  9. Squiggs

    Squiggs Registered User

    Mar 22, 2015
    2
    #9 Squiggs, Mar 22, 2015
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2015
    Can I put on a permanent Tagging device

    I have been looking after my aunt with dementia for several years, over which time she has become more and more dependant. She still lives at home alone and normally doesnt go out and she is safe in her house. Swe has just started wandering though looking for another house. Is there a way I can tag her like the police do criminals so I can trace where she is to find her?

    Sorry new to this was trying to start a new thread didn't mean to mess yours up
     
  10. LadyA

    LadyA Registered User

    Oct 19, 2009
    13,545
    Ireland
    Yes, we had that too. About the getting dressed problems, I learned to always (during this stage) approach things from the " I've left some clean clothes out for you. Would you like me to give you a hand, or can you manage? " Usually, but by no means always, once the decision was HIS, William opted for help. A bit further on, when there was no question of him being able to dress himself, I still gave him what control and choice he was able for - I would take 2 shirts in very different colours out, and he would point to the one he wanted.
    Regarding the shower & being afraid of what he's getting into - afraid I never found a solution for that, and it got to where at one point it went three weeks without me being able to wash, as he wouldn't let me out of his sight long enough. And as he only slept in short naps, day and night, I couldn't chance it when he was asleep.
     
  11. LadyA

    LadyA Registered User

    Oct 19, 2009
    13,545
    Ireland
    Squiggs, you can get tags and sensors etc.I'm sure there are a number of places in the UK that supply aids like that. I'm not sure if we are allowed mention particular firms- so I'll pm you the name of the only company I've dealt with.
     

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