• We're currently experiencing technical issues with our newsletter software, so our Dementia Talking Point monthly updates have been put on hold for now. We hope to restart the newsletter soon.

    Find out more >here<.

New here - when to get a needs assessment

flyingsolo

Registered User
Nov 14, 2015
4
I have just watched Wendy's Story - oh if only!! My OH is 64 but we have been struggling to get a diagnosis since 2013 and, this year, the decline has been rapid and we still have no definitive diagnosis just suggested Alzheimer's. The next appointment isn't until next year.
If only it was a question of putting up sticky notes and alarms on the phone. My OH feels tired all the time and just too weary to go out, he cannot remember friends and finds conversation difficult as a consequence and now shuns social contact. We can't even see a film together, as we did last year. He can no longer read a book, watch series on TV in fact his life has become very small indeed. He cannot find his way about on his own and now doesn't drive. I go out alone, tackle thing I have never done before on my own and have lost my companion in life and the sharer of my memories to a large degree.

I need to move on and get some government help sorted soon hence my thread. Should I get an assessment before he reaches 65 as that is only some months away, but probably before we get a diagnosis (at our present rate of progress)? Is there any financial advantage either way, before or after 65?
 

Beate

Registered User
May 21, 2014
12,031
London
I you are in the UK, ask for an assessment now. By the time someone reacts and comes out, he probably will have turned 65! What councils charge for social care entirely depends on them, and I couldn't tell you whether that differs according to age. But if you need help, ask for it sooner than later. You have a suggested diagnosis, that ought to do for now. If he is a vulnerabe adult at risk, social services have a duty of care.
 

flyingsolo

Registered User
Nov 14, 2015
4
Thanks for replying - yes UK and yes he is vulnerable. We had an issue with someone knocking on the door offering gardening services. My OH invited him in, was quoted an extortionate amount (which OH felt was reasonable!) On the fellas return I got rid of him but he had met OH and realised he was an easy mark and he had been in my home. I felt anxious for days after fearing the bloke's return. That's just one of several instances I could quote. The GP is aware as are the hospital but no one has ever suggested getting an assessment.
 

marionq

Registered User
Apr 24, 2013
6,135
Scotland
They are aware that all is not well but have not given a diagnosis? I think you should pursue this and also follow up on what comes next eg Attendance Allowance and then reduction in council tax. This will help when you have to pay for support later on. Next phone social services and get the ball rolling by asking for a needs assessment for him and a carers assessment for you.

Set up an emergency plan with them so that if you are ill help will be given. It all takes time so better to star now.
 

Beate

Registered User
May 21, 2014
12,031
London
Attendance Allowance is only for people over 65, so it would be PIP instead. But if he only has a few months to go, I would probably wait and then apply fo Attendance Allowance. Speak to Social Services first about assessments, as they can take a while!
 

flyingsolo

Registered User
Nov 14, 2015
4
Ok OH has just fallen down the stairs again! I am desperate so tell me - social services first, GP, DWP what? Before he kills himself.
 

Beate

Registered User
May 21, 2014
12,031
London
GP for the falls and referral to Memory Clinic, SS for assessments. Phone them both tomorrow. Make it urgent.

When you've got that out the way and are waiting for appointments/visits, phone for an AA claim pack: https://www.gov.uk/attendance-allowance/how-to-claim
They can backdate a claim to the day you call so you may have to wait until he actually turns 65.
 

MorbidMagpie

Registered User
Nov 10, 2015
23
England
I am a social worker for a local authority. Your husband's age won't impact on what you would pay for care, if you do indeed need to make a contribution - it will be means tested. The only thing that does differ in my LA is respite care as the cost of that does vary if the LA are contributing towards it and it does go off age, but your husband would already be in the highest age bracket for that anyway (which would also be the highest cost). That is due to an equation based on living cost and income that I don't quite remember the details of as finance is dealt with by a different team.

Your Local Authority might have an online calculator which you could use to find out what kind of cost you may face, I know the one I work for does.




Living each moment life throws at me as a social worker and with a dad with younger onset dementia.
 

MorbidMagpie

Registered User
Nov 10, 2015
23
England
Also, when you contact your LA let them know that your husband has been having a lot of falls, they will prioritise allocation of a social worker accordingly then and they may be able to refer you for beneficial services over the phone whilst you wait for the full assessment visit.


Living each moment life throws at me as a social worker and with a dad with younger onset dementia.