New drugs for short term memory loss

Loulee

Registered User
Jan 9, 2007
10
Suffolk
Hi

Consultant Psychiatrist came to see my nan on 22 Jan and things have moved pretty quickly since then.

She was assessed and Consultant said her memory was quite poor and would be in touch.

My nan has now been prescribed a new drug on the market for short-term memory loss, I am not sure what they are called, she is on a 4 month trial with the Alzheimer's Treatment Service and a lady is visiting tomorrow from Alzheimers Society to issue tablets.

Do they work - does anybody have any experience with these new drugs?

What are your views?

Many thanks

Loulee:confused:
 

Skye

Registered User
Aug 29, 2006
17,000
SW Scotland
Hi Loulee

The main Ad drugs are Aricept, Exelon & Reminyl, with Ebixa for the later stages. I don't know of any others, have you looked on the main Alzheimer's Society website?

let us know when you know the name.
 

Windfall

Registered User
Oct 18, 2005
12
Hampshire
Skye said:
Hi Loulee

The main Ad drugs are Aricept, Exelon & Reminyl, with Ebixa for the later stages. .
Not been around for ages...I've been lurking but not contributing..is that ok?

My mum's on Reminyl and I'm wondering why this was chosen and not Aricept, which seems to be, from reading this site, the most common prescription. She's in the middle of a two year trial of another treatment at the moment so nothing will be changed, I'm just curious.

Also curious if anyone else is taking part in the trial? It's based in Swindon and kensington and is funded by Elan pharmacutical.

Thanks
 

Skye

Registered User
Aug 29, 2006
17,000
SW Scotland
Windfall said:
Not been around for ages...I've been lurking but not contributing..is that ok?
Of course it's OK. If reading other people's posts answers your questions, that's great. You know you can post any time you want/need to.

As for Reminyl, there is a factsheet on the drugs

http://www.alzheimers.org.uk/After_diagnosis/Treatments/info_drugs.htm

Reminyl has an added ingredient which stimulates the production of acetylcholine, but is more expensive than the other drugs, which may be why Aricept is more commonly prescribed.
 

Nebiroth

Registered User
Aug 20, 2006
3,511
There are many reasons for the choice of a particular drug - existing medical conditions may indicate one is more suitable, the preferences of the consultant prescribing, addressing particular symptoms etc.

For example, my Dad is being switched from Aricept to Exelon because (we are told) Exelon seems to be more effective for people with severe delusions and paranoia. I believe it;s also the recommended one for people with Lewy bodies.

AFAIK, Aricept is the most common choice because of the three it is the one least likely to cause side-effects (with Exelon being the opposite!).

As to whether they work, this is impossible to predict for individual people. Some people benefit greatly, some do not benefit at all. In general, the best that can be hoped for is a temporary improvement in cognition (often referred to as "lifting the mental fog"), rather than memory. This has been our experience.

You may notice an improvement, a slowing of the decline, or nothing at all. It usually takes quite a while for any effects to become evident.

Once you know what drug is being prescribed, you can ask the consultant about it; you can ask what it is, what it is for, what might be expected, possible side-effects, and why it was chosen. It might be helpful to write down your questions before you see the consultant again.

Unfortunately, the doctors are often so busy that they will tell you very little - you need to ask if you want the details.
 

said

Registered User
Jul 4, 2006
643
London
Nada said:
I think this is highly unlikely. As far as I know, the Alzheimer's Society does NOT issue tablets or get involved in clinical trials.

Nada
Hi Loulee

Nada is quite right - The Alzheimer's Society does not issue tablets nor are we involved in clinical trials.

Lots of good information on this thread from other posters about the types of drug that are usually prescribed in your Nan's situation.

Said
 

Skye

Registered User
Aug 29, 2006
17,000
SW Scotland
Nebiroth said:
In general, the best that can be hoped for is a temporary improvement in cognition (often referred to as "lifting the mental fog"), rather than memory. This has been our experience.
I'd go along with the 'lifting the mental fog'. Reminyl (plus now Ebixa) hasn't had any effect on John's memory or speech, but had a dramatic effect on his mood and confidence.

Not sure about the 'temporary' aspect, though. John is seven years into AD, and is still remarkably well. This may be down to his variety of AD, or it could be the effect of the drug. Either way, I'm very grateful.
 

Loulee

Registered User
Jan 9, 2007
10
Suffolk
New drug for short term memory loss

Hi all

I have been able to find out a bit more today after visit.

Sorry for confusion re my last post of where people visiting me are from I am finding out as I go!!!

I saw someone from Alzheimer's Treament Service who is a Senior Community Mental Health Nurse.

She is the person who issued my nan's tablets today - these are galantamine XL (or also called Reminyl).

Has anyone first hand experience of someone they care for taking these long term?

Are they effective?

thanks

Loulee
 

Nebiroth

Registered User
Aug 20, 2006
3,511
Loulee said:
Are they effective?

thanks

Loulee
They may or may not be - every person is different, so you can't predict who will benefit and who won't. You just have to try them and wait and see the result - if any.

My Dad did very well from Aricept.

As Skye has said, you have to watch out for the side-effects which can be unpleasant; but again not everyone has a problem. We didn't get any side-effects at all from Aricept and (so far) Dad seems to be tolerating Exelon just as well.
 
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