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My mum was sectioned in February this year under section 2 and then onto a section 3 she is now back at home

Margaret11

New member
Jun 30, 2022
3
0
Mum was recently diagnosed with Lewy Body dementia in February and after having 2 falls after trying to run away from scary hallucinations was sectioned under section 2 and then 3 of the mental health act. She is now at home and is self caring and manages very well. She has recently started to have the hallucinations again and is scared to go to bed as they are in her bed. She is therefore not sleeping very well. It is very hard for me as I live in jersey. I am concerned about what happens next. I called the elderly mental health team and they emailed with a home visit for next Wednesday however I emailed back and said what could they do in the meantime as it would mean it would be two weeks of little sleep until the arranged visit which was very concerning. They have now agreed to visit tomorrow lunchtime. My mum wants to stay at home and can manage apart from having these scary hallucinations
 

Grannie G

Volunteer Moderator
Apr 3, 2006
76,279
0
Kent
My mum wants to stay at home and can manage apart from having these scary hallucinations

She is not managing though is she @Margaret11? She is afraid at night because of these hallucinations and is alone at home.

My husband hallucinated but I was with him 24/7 and they were not scary for him so we were able to live with them.

The Mental Health Team will want to do the best for your mother and I feel they will think her at risk if she is alone and having scary hallucinations.

Others may post about their own experiences which you may find helpful.



Welcome to the Forum. I hope you find it helpful and supportive.
 

update2020

Registered User
Jan 2, 2020
275
0
Hallucinations are fairly common in dementia as it advances. Your Mum is doing incredibly well if she is managing alone after being sectioned because of them.

My husband’s used to send him into rages where he would smash things up and he was a danger to himself and others. I could talk him down most of the time but it was a constant effort. He was already well past the stage where he could look after himself.

If I were you I would start planning for your mother not to live so alone (the alternative is to wait for a crisis in which she will be hospitalised one way or another).

There are medications but they might also make your mother less able to cope. She may become at greater risk of falls, less able to look after herself and even incontinent.
 

Rosettastone57

Registered User
Oct 27, 2016
1,741
0
How do you know your mum is managing well? Is this what she is telling you or is this an independent view? Many persons with dementia will tell everyone they are doing just fine, but the reality is very different . If your mum is very frightened and having falls, then she shouldn't be living on her own. Start planning for this, as others have said.
 

nitram

Registered User
Apr 6, 2011
25,451
0
North Manchester
As your mum has been released from section 3 it is likely that she has been prescribed medication, if so I would be worried that she is taking this correctly.
 

Thethirdmrsc

Registered User
Apr 4, 2018
668
0
My OH has LBD, and he managed to wander onto a mainline railway track, and he was then sectioned, and entered a care home. I couldn’t cope with the paranoia and hallucinations. He would take mirrors off the walls, shout at me, and the “others” he saw. It was hard, but getting him into a care home was for the best.
 

SeaSwallow

Registered User
Oct 28, 2019
231
0
My hubby has LBD and he definitely would not be able to live on his own even though he is mostly fine during the day. Although he rarely has hallucinations he does have vivid dreams which he has acted out. I need to be with him at night to keep him safe. If you cannot be with your mum I think that full time care is the only option.
 

Margaret11

New member
Jun 30, 2022
3
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Thank you for your comments I have finally got mum to agree to going into a residential home. She is currently staying with her sister. I was wondering if those of you that commented regarding partners or family members if walking would become a problem so quick. Mum was able to walk unaided on Tuesday and is now having difficulty. Is there anything that could be done to improve this.
 

update2020

Registered User
Jan 2, 2020
275
0
Thank you for your comments I have finally got mum to agree to going into a residential home. She is currently staying with her sister. I was wondering if those of you that commented regarding partners or family members if walking would become a problem so quick. Mum was able to walk unaided on Tuesday and is now having difficulty. Is there anything that could be done to improve this.
Well done on the progress! It’s hard to say on the fading mobility as it can be caused by many different things, including the side effects of some medications, by undetected seizures or just progression of the disease (which can be sudden as well as slow). Best to involve a doctor??
 

update2020

Registered User
Jan 2, 2020
275
0
I also meant to say that if her sister is elderly herself she may not be able to cope for very long on her own.
 

canary

Registered User
Feb 25, 2014
18,833
0
South coast
I was wondering if those of you that commented regarding partners or family members if walking would become a problem so quick.
Could she have an infection of some sort?
When my OH gets an infection (especially a UTI) he does not get the usual symptoms of a temperature etc, but instead loses mobility.