My mum does not want to eat

Discussion in 'I care for a person with dementia' started by Noush, Nov 23, 2015.

  1. Noush

    Noush Registered User

    Nov 23, 2015
    2
    Mauritius
    Hi

    My mum is 65. She has been diagnosed pre senile dementia. Since three years. She keeps on forgetting things. And hides everything. For example you find a mango in her wardrobe. Now my concern is she does not want to eat. She says she has already eaten.


    What to do.

    Thanks to help.
     
  2. Essie

    Essie Registered User

    Feb 11, 2015
    566
    Hi Noush, welcome to TP. There are a number of possibilities why your Mum isn't eating - she may genuinely think she has already eaten, and not be recognising any more that she is actually hungry or she may be unable to deal with making food for herself any more so simply avoids doing it - you don't say if she lives with you or alone.

    This is the AS's page on eating problems - https://www.alzheimers.org.uk/site/scripts/documents_info.php?documentID=149 it covers all sorts of different problems and possible solutions so hopefully something there that might help.

    My own advice would be, if possible, to eat with her or have her eat with you and the family as much as possible - there is a technical name for it that I can't remember but basically when we eat in groups we eat more so that may help your Mum regain her appetite a little.

    Good luck.
     
  3. Noush

    Noush Registered User

    Nov 23, 2015
    2
    Mauritius
    Actually we do not live together. She stays with my father. I stay thre on sundays and mondays. Everyday i cook food and send for them. During the day there is a caere with her. My aunty lives next door. So they have lunch together (my mum, carer and aunty). But its the same thing. Sometimes i think she does this on purpose. When i stay there we eat together (my husband, me , my mum and father), same thing. She plays with her food until my husband feeds her. I do not if she does that only to have attention.

    im at a loss
     
  4. lin1

    lin1 Registered User

    Jan 14, 2010
    9,322
    Female
    East Kent
    Hi Noush
    I'm wondering if Mum is forgetting how to feed herself or losing the ability to use cutlery.
    Both happened with my Mum and she had to be fed.
    Its this horrid disease doing this to your mum.

    Many people with dementia end up not being able to eat full meals and need food little and often throughout the day.
     
  5. MrsTerryN

    MrsTerryN Registered User

    Dec 17, 2012
    773
    Noush my mum sometimes has problems with eating and doesn't eat much nowadays. I was wondering how about finger food ? Mum eats the little individual cheese and crackers and also bags of chips. Also on occasions sandwiches . Her cutlery using days are a bit hit and miss
     
  6. fizzie

    fizzie Registered User

    Jul 20, 2011
    2,739
    I agree my Ma had days when she seemed to disconnect between what is in front of her - the cutlery or the food and just not know what to do with it and so pushed it around. It wasn't that she didn't want it, the connections just weren't there. Feeding sometimes helped but often made her hostile and so pieces of quiche, tomatoes, sandwiches, and best of all sweet things did the trick. She could pick up and eat with some encouragement and a lot of smiles

    It may not be that she doesn't want to but she just doesn't know how to xx
     
  7. Essie

    Essie Registered User

    Feb 11, 2015
    566
    I too would say try finger foods, whatever you think your Mum would enjoy but chopped up - fruit looks nice, or vegetable sticks, sandwiches cut into small pieces, chips, or small boiled potatoes, mini sausages, cake in small chunks, etc. think party nibbles! If she eats when someone feeds her it would suggest that she can still physically eat but is struggling with the process of feeding herself using cutlery which isn't uncommon.

    Rather than let it become a 'thing' changing what's on Mum's plate might make all the difference.
     

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