1. Expert Q&A: Benefits - Weds 23 October, 3-4pm

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    You can either post your question >here< or email them to us at talkingpoint@alzheimers.org.uk and we'll be happy to ask them on your behalf.

My husband has Lewy body dementia.

Discussion in 'I care for a person with dementia' started by Maisieknit, Jan 19, 2015.

  1. Maisieknit

    Maisieknit Registered User

    Jan 19, 2015
    1
    My husband has hallucinations, and cannot understand why I cant see what he is seeing. I wish to know how to respond in the best way to help him.
    I would greatly appreciate any advice
     
  2. Canadian Joanne

    Canadian Joanne Volunteer Moderator

    Apr 8, 2005
    16,110
    Toronto, Canada
    Hello Maisieknit and welcome to Talking Point (TP). I'm not sure how you can deal with it, except to say that if you wear glasses, you can blame it on your glasses?

    From what I understand about LBD, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's medications can be beneficial. Antipsychotics are very much contraindicated, far more so than for other dementias, as they cause a worsening of symptoms and even cause other major issues. Is your husband currently on any medications?

    I did think perhaps you could refer to things you see that he doesn't but that might only confuse and anger him.
     
  3. nitram

    nitram Registered User

    Apr 6, 2011
    19,035
    Male
    North Manchester
    If they are not disturbing him just passively go along with it and try to distract him.

    A combination of Memantine and Sodium Valproate eased things quite a bit with my wife who also had LBD although the Sodium Valproate was originally prescribed to control Parkinsonism.
     
  4. Trace2012

    Trace2012 Registered User

    Jun 24, 2013
    162
    What if these hallucinations are scary for the person, my mam is waiting for the day scan to diagnose LBD and my mam has these delusions about the neighbours, they are that real to her that she had to be sectioned as she sed she wanted to kill them! She is on a anti phycotic at the minute which is a low dose but isn't working at all! Infact I honestly think she's worse! It's stressing my and y kids out as we also live with her xx


    Sent from my iPhone using Talking Point
     
  5. henfenywfach

    henfenywfach Registered User

    May 23, 2013
    333
    rct
    Hi maisieknit

    I care for my dad who has dlb.
    Unfortunately there are no licenced meds for lewy bodys..but sometimes.donepezil is given for the alzheimers symptoms to help the cognitive side...
    There can be delusions where they see things you see just differently..and tell a different story to them...or hallucinations where generally they cant be ..and sometimes noises animals or people..these sometimes startle cause distress upset wellbeing..so get assisted by medication sometimes.
    My dad sees a police car and describes a riot arrests fighting and people running about...its only actually a police car parked .

    If which ever causes major upset harm in anyway then we address it..if not then we either distract or agree or acknowledge...we never ever disagree or correct....

    If your brain no matter how damaged gave you a response and someone kept on correcting you..i would imagine it could be so annoying..
    Aggitation and aggression are forms of communicating really..not nice to be on the recieving end..but over time you learn what upsets or doesnt and sometimes read body language.
    Best wishes

    Sent from my GT-I9505 using Talking Point mobile app
     

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