1. Linda Mc

    Linda Mc Registered User

    Jul 3, 2005
    1,881
    Nr Mold
    Today Vic has been to music therapy and played a bongo drum and the organiser had him dancing to "What do you want to make those eyes at me for" It was so lovely to see him laughing and smiling a little flash of what he used to be like (and I nearly didn't take him as it was so cold here -3 degrees!):eek:

    This is a new initiative here a six week course. I had heard about it being trialed in our neighbouring county with great success so thought I would give it a try. It began with simple rhythms and chants and the little dance was to warm us up because it was so cold.

    Go again in two weeks.:)

    Linda x
     
  2. Grannie G

    Grannie G Volunteer Moderator

    Apr 3, 2006
    69,866
    Kent
    It sounds wonderful. I wish there was something like that in this area.

    I`ll try to remember it when those forms come round asking for suggestions.
     
  3. christine_batch

    christine_batch Registered User

    Jul 31, 2007
    3,388
    Buckinghamshire
    Music Therapy is great for our loved ones. I use to play Peter his Country & Western C.D. and sing along with song and bless him, he would sing bits that he could remember. As we use to do line dancing, I would do a few steps and he would have a great laugh and yes so did the Staff.
    Oh those where the days.
    Christine
     
  4. 117katie

    117katie Guest

    I Do That Too!

    Dear Christine, that is exactly what I have been doing for the last two years. In fact, when my aunt first went to the day centre, I was horrified by the so-called music that was being blasted at them, so I made a few compilation CDs of 'suitable music that I knew they would all remember and enjoy' and within half-an-hour, the sing-along brought tears to my eyes. Just goes to show: that if only the professionals would listen to us, we would all get somewhere.

    But bad news as far as my aunt is concerned: still in hospital, and still not expected to survive this onslaught. I am asking the most serious questions I can ask about her care over the days and weeks before she was ambulanced to A&E. But am meeting the usual "wall of fog".

    Take care, and keep on musically.

    KATIE
     
  5. river_

    river_ Registered User

    Oct 15, 2007
    33
    UK
    I dont know where we would be without music at work!
    The old chaps seem to like football songs and unfortunately sectarian ones but hey it's a bit late to try to change them now!

    Abba is a big hit with a few of the ladies and me :)

    Country music always goes down well.

    Classical really dosent work.

    Scots country Ceilidh music is great f or getting them up dancing.

    It's great to be able to distract them from whatever drama is going on with a song or a dance (what are weeeee)ahem, and it is amazing how tenants who have lost their most basic skills have mean rhythm on the dance floor.

    For the folks who have poor mobility we hold hands and drum the rhythm or slow dance.

    Whats really good is music videos, Scotdisk have made some great ones, nice tunes to sing along to and tap your feet (yeeeehoo!) with captivating landscape filming and cheerful looking folks in tartan shirts :D
     
  6. daughter

    daughter Registered User

    Mar 16, 2005
    824
    On her daily visits to see Dad in his Home, my Mum would always take him to his room and put on CD's (the Scottish music was one of their favourites!) It was great when Dad clapped in encouragement while Mum and I did the highland fling (after a fashion)!

    I also now know many of the old war-time song lyrics off by heart now.

    Music - the food of love. :)
     
  7. Brucie

    Brucie Registered User

    Jan 31, 2004
    12,413
    near London
    The topic of music is an interesting one, both for the person who is in care, and for the carer themselves.

    Music is something that has a very broad spread. Not everyone likes everything, and that is great as it makes for variety.

    I lament a programme that was on radio every week years ago "Family Favourites". The programme, listened to by a wide public, featured requests from families to their loved ones who were in the forces overseas. The range of music we heard on the programme was enormously wide, and I probably learned more about breadth in that programme than anywhere else when I was young.

    Yes, there were those "Oh not, not 'Nellie the elephant' moments", but frankly, not that many.

    Today, radio stations and TV stations are very much focussed on specific kinds of music and, while I listen to Radio 2 a lot in the car - Jeremy Vine - I generally turn the music down and just listen to the topics discussed.

    At Jan's home, with its eclectic mix of carers from all over, music is often put on that seems to me to be inappropriate, either in style or volume. Those with dementia are not necessarily any deafer than the rest of us, but they don't often have the ability to put the volume down [or up] or to ask for that.

    The carers there have asked me to create some CDs for Jan to listen to when she is in bed in the evenings, and over the years I have done that. I believe that music can breach even the walls of dementia.

    Speaking as a carer, music has a huge effect on me, always has. Perhaps that is the Welsh in me. There is little music produced before 2001 that does not have some resonance because of our time together before that time, and some songs today [Bublé's "Lost", for instance] are almost unbearable emotionally.
    Abba and country are always on my iPod, along with 200 Sinatra songs.

    Classical music, in its own right, has an immense spread from the Middle Ages to the present, so don't write it off entirely, but I agree in the context of a workplace it is probably not ideal ;)
     
  8. connie

    connie Registered User

    Mar 7, 2004
    9,519
    Frinton-on-Sea
    I keep the radio on in Lionel's room all the time during the day.

    This I intersperse with CDs that I know he likes - he had a varied taste in music.

    Originally posted by daughter
    I have to say I am old enough to remember them all from the war.
    I love a good old fashioned 'sing along'

    The world would be very empty without music.
     
  9. Brucie

    Brucie Registered User

    Jan 31, 2004
    12,413
    near London
    Never!

    Oh! I guess you mean the Falklands War!
     
  10. Skye

    Skye Registered User

    Aug 29, 2006
    17,000
    SW Scotland
    I play Mozart over and over when John is in his own room, it's guaranteed to soothe him. But I agree it probably wouldn't suit everyone.

    PS I also play radio 2 in the car but have to keep adjusting the volume. If I can hear what they are saying, the music deafens me!
     
  11. Brucie

    Brucie Registered User

    Jan 31, 2004
    12,413
    near London
    I can't agree more - I have many classical CDs for Jan as she was classically trained, and introduced me to much of the canon.

    Just to clarify - not for you Hazel :) - by Middle Ages, I was referring to early music, not middle aged people...

    David Munrow was the icon here http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Munrow

    By choice, I like Baroque, with liberal lashings of Ludwig Van and Tchaik. :) They happen to correspond with Jan's likes too, which was always handy. ;)
     
  12. Norman

    Norman Registered User

    Oct 9, 2003
    4,348
    Birmingham Hades
    Bruce
    surely the Gulf war ?
    Norman
     
  13. Skye

    Skye Registered User

    Aug 29, 2006
    17,000
    SW Scotland
    When I was a student, and mixing with the 'highbrow' (yes, students were highbrow in those days -- at least some of them), Tchaik was dismissed as a lightweight romantic. I always liked him, though.

    Beethoven -- oh yes! Something for everyone there. Baroque -- depends on the situation -- and the mood. Can be sublime.
     
  14. Grannie G

    Grannie G Volunteer Moderator

    Apr 3, 2006
    69,866
    Kent
    Dhiren`s favourite music is anything from

    • Andrea Bocelli
      Abba
      Charlie Landsborough

    Then he listens to Classic FM and Sukh Sagar [an Indian music station on Sky]. He also likes nostalgic music from the 50s and 60s.

    So quite a diverse taste in music, all depending on his mood.
     
  15. christine_batch

    christine_batch Registered User

    Jul 31, 2007
    3,388
    Buckinghamshire
    Well Sylvia, I was so happy to see Charlie Langsborough there. I took Peter to see him on so many occassions and we became friends with him.
    As it is my wedding anniversary to-day and feeling really down, just seeing Charlie's name came up you have given me a big smile a bit tearful but when we met him, Peter was in awe. So we have all his C.D. D.V.D.'s. Peter use to love playing them in E.M.I. Unit. So thank you for that memory.
    "What Colour is the Wind".....
    Love from Christine
     
  16. cynron

    cynron Registered User

    Sep 26, 2005
    429
    east sussex
    Some roses

    Dear Christine. Sending you some virtual roses.

    Cynthia x x
     

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  17. christine_batch

    christine_batch Registered User

    Jul 31, 2007
    3,388
    Buckinghamshire
    Dear Cynron,
    Thank you for the flowers that is really lovely of you. Had a knock on the door and there stood my youngest Son who is getting married in April, just passing and wanted to give me a hug and tell me he loved me. Earlier eldest daughter phoned saying think of you to-day. So I am at this computer tears running down my face. "Little things to them - mean so much "
    Thank you. Christine
     
  18. Skye

    Skye Registered User

    Aug 29, 2006
    17,000
    SW Scotland
    Christine, you have a lovely, caring family, and what a blessing that is.

    Sending you a huge hug on your anniversary.

    Love,
     

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  19. christine_batch

    christine_batch Registered User

    Jul 31, 2007
    3,388
    Buckinghamshire
    Thank you Hazel,
    Before A.D. Peter always got our anniversary mixed up with my birthday which is the 20th February, so he was never one for remebering until family came in with cake, cards, presents. Peter would slip out round to the shops and buy me a box of Black Magic. O.K. so the thought was there but the card was anniversary. I hate Black Magic because I am a Belgain choc lover. At the end of the day it is the thought that counts.Just another one of those memories we resurfice at times.
    Love from Christine.
     
  20. river_

    river_ Registered User

    Oct 15, 2007
    33
    UK
    *Hugs C*


    I'm interested to see the comments about classical music, when I put it on in the care house it didnt seem to go down well, the lack of repetitive rhythm was the problem I think, melodies and beats you can sing along to or dance to seem to work best.
     

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