Music and dementia

Discussion in 'Books, film and music' started by nae sporran, Jan 16, 2019.

  1. nae sporran

    nae sporran Volunteer Host

    Oct 29, 2014
    5,181
    Male
    Bristol
  2. Grannie G

    Grannie G Volunteer Moderator

    Apr 3, 2006
    67,718
    Kent
    Music certainly helped my husband. He was not a singer but he loved listening to music and watching DVDs of his favourites Andrea Bocelli and Nana Mouskouri.

    Mind you I had to be careful. We were listening to Nana Mouskouri singing Everybody Hurts and he asked me to turn it off, saying it was too sad.

     
  3. SKD

    SKD Registered User

    Music definitely helps my Mum - she will sing along and sometimes dances and is generally put into a happier place - she and my Dad were great ballroom dancers - I have noticed that after a music session her speech, which has been deteriorating recently, shows a distinct if slight improvement. It's a short term gain which soon disappears but it's well worth having.
     
  4. stanleypj

    stanleypj Registered User

    Dec 8, 2011
    10,455
    North West
    #4 stanleypj, Jan 16, 2019
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 16, 2019
    For several years l took S (latterly with help from our wonderful carer K) to a weekly event for people with dementia and other diseases/disabilities. It was and is led by a woman who had an infectious enthusiasm which drove the whole thing. Each week you could see people perking up and coming alive in response.
     
  5. nae sporran

    nae sporran Volunteer Host

    Oct 29, 2014
    5,181
    Male
    Bristol
    That's why I take OH to music memories, those little moments are well worth treasuring. How lovely for you SKD. :)
     
  6. canary

    canary Registered User

    Feb 25, 2014
    8,218
    Female
    South coast
    I wish OH responded to music, but he gets stimulus overload, doesnt like singing and if I put music on he asks me ti turn it off.
    Theres a lot of silence in my house.
     
  7. Grannie G

    Grannie G Volunteer Moderator

    Apr 3, 2006
    67,718
    Kent
    Wonderful. :)
     
  8. Izzy

    Izzy Volunteer Moderator

    Aug 31, 2003
    58,096
    Female
    Dundee
    Music was so important in Bill’s life. We were (and I still am) members of our memories choir. Until the week before Bill died he still came to the weekly sessions with me. Somehow he could still read the words and join in. He remembered the words to some of the songs. He had a habit of calling out ‘yeehah’ if he particularly liked the song!

    His carer, who has become a dear friend, is a classical tenor. While he was showering Bill you could hear the two of them belting out La Donna e Mobile and other opera favourites. It lifted his (and our) mood incredibly.

    Latterly I got involved with the Playlist for Life approach. I think it was a bit late for Bill but I did it anyway. The songs chosen for the playlists are selected in discussion with the person with dementia and are intended to spark memories In the hope it it will lead to discussion. I had to choose Bill’s songs without his input. They sparked emotions if not memories. Some resulted in a tear running down his face, others in raucous laughter and some he joined in with. The film clips in this link are interesting. https://www.playlistforlife.org.uk/playlist-in-action
     
  9. Izzy

    Izzy Volunteer Moderator

    Aug 31, 2003
    58,096
    Female
    Dundee
    Thinking about music and dementia made me think of this clip. It never fails to bring a year to my eye.

     
  10. Grannie G

    Grannie G Volunteer Moderator

    Apr 3, 2006
    67,718
    Kent
    It`s amazing.

    Here is another `miracle`.

     
  11. nae sporran

    nae sporran Volunteer Host

    Oct 29, 2014
    5,181
    Male
    Bristol
    S
    Sorry Canary, that has to be hard for you.
     
  12. Sirena

    Sirena Registered User

    Feb 27, 2018
    715
    Female
    I sometimes visit my mother during the weekly Music For Health session at the care home, and it is noticeable the positive effect it has on the residents. The man who runs it is lovely and knows all their names and level of ability. He plays anything from Frank Sinatra to Abba, and classic music/opera. Several of the residents will get up and dance, a lot of them will join in singing or banging a tamborine. My mother is always up and dancing and she knows all the words to the songs without prompting, despite no longer being able to string together a five word sentence.

    There is one resident however who hates it (possibly for the same reason as Canary's husband), she calls it 'noise' and walks the corridors complaining until it ends.
     

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