1. Bittermama

    Bittermama Registered User

    Jun 9, 2012
    27
    Kingston, Surrey
    Hello all,
    My mum is 86 and has vascular dementia and Alzheimer's since 2010. For the last few months she has been having problems using the stairs so we moved her bed downstairs as none of her carers could get her up or down. All was fine until she began to get frightened of the steps on the bus that took her to her daycare centre. To cut a long story short, 3 weeks ago the daycare centre refused to take her anymore unless we could take her and pick her up ourselves. So mum has been stuck at home. During this time she developed a chest infection and was admitted to hospital where she stayed for 2 weeks! She is now at home, but another problem has arisen - she won't / can't get out of bed and it seems she will be bed bound. My sister and I are at our wits end and don't know what to do. Any advice would be gratefully received. Is this another stage of this awful condition? Thank you
     
  2. canary

    canary Registered User

    Feb 25, 2014
    9,331
    Female
    South coast
    Hi bittermama
    I dont know if its related in any way to her staying in bed, but I know that one of the problems with dementia is that they can lose their 3D vision. Steps can be a particular problem as they dont know how far away they are and where to put their feet. This could explain the problems with stairs and going on the bus.
     
  3. Lindy50

    Lindy50 Registered User

    Dec 11, 2013
    5,287
    Cotswolds
    This might or might not be directly caused by dementia .....but in any case I'd get the GP in, if you haven't already. Also do you have any equipment that might help? Anything from a little step and a thing called a bed leaver, to the bigger stuff? An OT could advise, either via the GP, or adult social care.

    I'd try to keep mum mobile if possible ( note the 'if possible')

    Good luck :) I hope you can get something sorted.

    Lindy xx

    PS Just noticed you are new. Welcome to TP :)
     
  4. Bittermama

    Bittermama Registered User

    Jun 9, 2012
    27
    Kingston, Surrey
    Thank you, I did not know that
     
  5. Bittermama

    Bittermama Registered User

    Jun 9, 2012
    27
    Kingston, Surrey
    Thank you, yes I haven't posted much but find this site invaluable knowing you are not alone and that there are so many of us affected by this disease. I will get in touch with OT, so far they have provided us with a special bed which is probably so comfortable mum doesn't want to get out of it!
     
  6. Lindy50

    Lindy50 Registered User

    Dec 11, 2013
    5,287
    Cotswolds
    Can I have one of those, please? The bed, I mean? ;) xx
     
  7. tre

    tre Registered User

    Sep 23, 2008
    1,353
    Herts
    Your post made me count my blessings. Just last week my husband started really struggling with the steps on the bus that takes him to daycare. They rang me to discuss this and it was agreed that they would assist him on the hydraulic ramp at the back of the bus which the wheelchair users use.
    Does your daycare not provide any access for people with mobility issues? Maybe ours is different as it provides multipurpose daycare, so there are young people there as well.
    This seems really unfair on your mum. Are they not meant to provide access for everyone?
    Tre
     
  8. Acco

    Acco Registered User

    Oct 3, 2011
    228
    My wife, 9yrs plus Alz and VaD, now finds it almost impossible to walk just a few small steps with support and loses balance or connection with her legs, especially the left side. It would be easier for me, and perhaps less of a trial for my wife, if I gave up trying but I firmly believe it is best for Pat if I keep her attempting to walk, stand, turn, sit, stand, etc. Steps and stairs gradually became a problem for her over the last 6 to 12months, possibly because she no longer differentiates distance and height. I have also noted for some time that changes in floor colours from room to room caused her to hesitate, or sometimes try to step up, again because of changes in the brains perception of what it sees. It was explained to me by our consultant long ago about how a part of the brain builds up a flat black and white picture, then passes it to a second area of the brain where it then adds colour, depth and texture - it was said it is these areas that often deteriorate first and can be an early indication of the disease.
    We received helpful advice from an O.T., via our G.P., regarding the addition of handrails, increased height seating positions, etc. and I suggest it may be helpful for you to pursue this. Some of the extra aids are/may be supplied and installed f.o.c. I am sorry to say that, yes, it is another stage in this awful disease. My best wishes for some help and resolution of the situation you are experiencing with your mum.
     
  9. Bittermama

    Bittermama Registered User

    Jun 9, 2012
    27
    Kingston, Surrey
    Unfortunately mum refuses to sit in the wheelchair and all the staff from the bus and her carer say they can't force her.
     
  10. tre

    tre Registered User

    Sep 23, 2008
    1,353
    Herts
    Sorry, I did not make it clear. My husband does not sit in a wheelchair on the tail lift. The carer walks him to the back of the bus where the platform is lowered and then he and the carer stand on the platform holding onto the big yellow hand rail. The platform then goes up so he has level access to the bus assisted by the carer.
    Tre
     
  11. stanleypj

    stanleypj Registered User

    Dec 8, 2011
    10,561
    North West
    If you have the time, it is worth trying hard to see if your mum can regain some mobility. It seems quite common for people's mobility to disappear during a hospital stay or when they enter a care home. But it may not always be a permanent loss. I agree with Acco that it's worth trying to encourage whatever movements she can make, gradually trying to extend them.
     
  12. Bittermama

    Bittermama Registered User

    Jun 9, 2012
    27
    Kingston, Surrey
    Thank you all for your advice. Mum is now going to have some physio, she is out of bed and a bit more settled. She clung on to me all evening yesterday it was heartbreaking.
     

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