1. Rosie

    Rosie Registered User

    Jun 10, 2004
    235
    South East Wales, UK.
    Hi everyone, Haven't been here for a little while, before xmas mam was ill with a chest infection + we were all fearing the worst ! But I'm so glad to say that she seem's to be over the infection + seem's to be enjoying the food again. The one thing I've noticed is that when I visited last she seemed quite jumpy, I've never noticed this as much before. Any ideas what could be causing this ? Thank's again for the support, keep up the good advice everyone . Best wishes Rosie x.
     
  2. Norman

    Norman Registered User

    Oct 9, 2003
    4,348
    Birmingham Hades
    Hi Rosie
    nice to hear from you again.
    Glad Mum seems better,but what do you mean jumpy?
    Best wishes
    Norman
     
  3. Brucie

    Brucie Registered User

    Jan 31, 2004
    12,413
    near London
    Hello Rosie

    I find that it is often the case that, after some disturbance of some kind - a virus, an infection, a fall, or a mini stroke - Jan's brain seems to recover a bit, and that can make her situation even more confusing for her. Also, any virus or whatever must be additionally stressful for those with dementia.

    You may find that this is the reason that Mam is not her 'usual' self.
     
  4. Rosie

    Rosie Registered User

    Jun 10, 2004
    235
    South East Wales, UK.
    Hello Norman, What I meant by jumpy is mini jerky movement's as if startled , but when she was awake it was every few minutes, the nursing staff told the family that mum was having more difficulty with muscle spasm's so maybe related to this ? She has had fit's in the past but not for a long time now. When she was asleep I never noticed them. Any idea's ? Rosie.
     
  5. Rosie

    Rosie Registered User

    Jun 10, 2004
    235
    South East Wales, UK.
    Hi Brucie, You may be right about the infection contributing to these jerky movements, thank's for your advice , always appreciated . Rosie.
     
  6. jackie w

    jackie w Registered User

    Jan 4, 2004
    10
    devon
    Rosie my mum jerks all the time ,very alarming especially if she has a drink in her hand at the time.I spoke to her Dr. who said it was nerve connections being destroyed? I thought it was just another part of this horrible diease.
     
  7. Norman

    Norman Registered User

    Oct 9, 2003
    4,348
    Birmingham Hades
    Rosie
    I don't know what could cause the "jumps"I suspect they are all part of AD.
    I would ask the Dr neaxt time you see him/her
    Norman
     
  8. connie

    connie Registered User

    Mar 7, 2004
    9,519
    Frinton-on-Sea
    Hi all, on this subject Lionel 'jerks' a lot. We often spill drinks because of this, and jerking has caused him to roll off the edge of the bed. No reason given, although i have mentioned this to his CPN.
    The consultant, las week, thought he may be having mini-strokes, so has oreder a CT scan.
     
  9. angela.robinson

    angela.robinson Registered User

    Dec 27, 2004
    520
    hi rosie
    my husband has these jerks too ,but he always did this in his sleep anyway ,even before there was any problems with AD but when he started jerking during the day since his illness ,the GP just told me not toworry about them they were nerve impulses ,i wasnot very satisfied with the answer but as he had them earlier i did not bother about them ,however he now jerks lots more and usually when i put something in his hand ,even though he uses a feeder cup he still makes a hell of a
    mess
     
  10. Chesca

    Chesca Guest

    Hello Rosie

    To add to other members' experiences, Mum has these spasms during the night, prior to the nursing home Dad used to remark on her 'kicking out' in the night. She doesn't seem to experience is during her waking hours, although if she falls asleep in a chair I can see these impulses at work.

    But I'm afraid I don't know why. Bruce did mention some time back in another post, I think, about electric impulses to the brain occasioning this, which seems to be supported by others' experiences.

    Lovely to have you back
    Chesca
     
  11. Brucie

    Brucie Registered User

    Jan 31, 2004
    12,413
    near London
    the very worst jerks Jan ever had was when put on Seroxat. I took her off it after a single dose as the effects were so drastic.

    Point is, they can also be medication induced.
     
  12. Rosie

    Rosie Registered User

    Jun 10, 2004
    235
    South East Wales, UK.
    Hi Brucie,
    My mum is not on any medication , so I think maybe it's as you said all to do with the illness , but thank's for all your reply's, most helpful. Rosie .
     
  13. Louise

    Louise Registered User

    Dec 19, 2004
    22
    PEMBROKESHIRE
    Dear Rosie,
    So pleased to hear your mum has recovered. I have been wondering how evething was going. On the note of jumpy, that was something i noticed with my mum. I can't remember when it first started, but, i do remember that after she had a nasty fall, 2yrs ago the twitching fingers and jumping seemed to get worse. I don't really know the cause, but i thought that it was little involuntary electical impulses, something to do with the central nervous system. I think that it is related to AD.
    Hope you are feeling well and all is a bit more copeable, take care!!
    Love Louise xxx
     
  14. Mjaqmac

    Mjaqmac Registered User

    Mar 13, 2004
    939
    Mum developed jumps after being on Seroquel which I took her off. She does still however do this when a chest infection strikes. It seems to be something which accompanies AD, infections and some medications.
     
  15. Boatgirl

    Boatgirl Registered User

    Jan 23, 2005
    3
    Beds
    I noticed my mum having jerky movements after she was put on muscle relaxants, and we decided to take her off the drugs for a while. Sure enough the symptoms cleared.
    This however set me off on another trail of enquiry - how to bring some relief to patients like mum who were not getting physio/occupational health therapy but were nonetheless suffering increasingly from contortion and muscle deterioration. I was told that alternative treatment in the form of hydrotherapy could usefully form part of the care programme.
    I then made more enquiries and found that virtually all the hydrotherapy pools within a 60 mile radius exclude AD patients. I found 1 charity-run location on the other side of Bedfordshire which was appropriately equipped and would be willing to accept these patients provided that "preparations" had taken place to control incontinence and supervision criteria were met. This didn't get further forward for a number of reasons and finally Mum died just before Christmas.
    I haven't lost sight of the issue and am starting to make enquiries of local authorities as to whether something can be made available locally. Here it is apparently distinguished as 'health' related service so should be funded through health authorities rather than something deemed appropriate for a 'leisure' centre facility funded by the local council.
    Does anyone have actual experience of using alternative therapies such as hydrotherapy to help AD patients with muscle deterioration? I have read about its use in connection with rhematoid arthritis and it appears to be highly effective. Any info would help, as I want to be on as solid ground as possible clinically.
     

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