Mum settled in care home, but now in hospital with broken hip

Discussion in 'Middle - later stages of dementia' started by chrisdee, Jan 21, 2015.

  1. chrisdee

    chrisdee Registered User

    Nov 23, 2014
    171
    Yorkshire
    Mum has been in ch for 3 months now, and by and large she has settled. Sadly, she had a fall and broke her hip last Sunday. She was operated on quickly, last Monday. But due to age, 91, combination of drugs as well as being on Warfarin, she is taking a long time to become 'wakeful' and get to the point of physios starting to mobilise her. Previously mobility was good. I know this is a medical question really, and we have been reassured by staff in the large general hospital we have every confidence in. However, it would be helpful to hear from other members facing this common problem. This sounds very selfish, but I was just starting to relax a bit and get life on track after the care at home treadmill. Now faced with difficult drive and big hospital parking problems every other day. Bro and I go alternate days. Maybe my worries seem small, but I'm feeling that familiar worry syndrome starting up again. Mum is in residential, not nursing, care so keen not to have to find another home for her after all we have been through. I'd like to hear how other patients have fared? thanks.
     
  2. Witzend

    Witzend Registered User

    Aug 29, 2007
    4,282
    SW London
    My mother broke a hip at the same age, but recovered pretty well. She wouldn't do any physio - dementia was pretty bad by then and she could be on the stroppy side anyway - but still managed to get about, albeit more wobbly than before. She was back at her CH within 10 days, a dementia home, but not with nursing. She is still there at 96. However I know we were lucky as she is extremely resilient and has the general constitution of a rhinoceros. (Her anaesthetist apparently said, 'Boy, this is one tough old bird!' )

    I do hope your mum will recover well - fingers Xed.
     
  3. Pete R

    Pete R Registered User

    Jul 26, 2014
    2,046
    Staffs
    Mom broke her hip in 2011, she was up and putting weight on it within a few days and able to walk with a frame after 2 weeks. Never had a problem with it since.

    After a another fall last Easter where she broke her pelvis it took her a lot longer to get over the affects of the anaesthetic but the break healed well.

    I wish your Mum and yourself well.:)
     
  4. Rosie Webros

    Rosie Webros Registered User

    May 8, 2013
    181
    Hi there, my dad also was settled in his nursing home. Then last year at the age of 82 he fell out of bed and was rushed to hospital. He just had a bump on his head but on looking at his x-rays the staff noticed that he had broken his neck in two places! I know it is not the same as breaking a hip, but we feared the worst. He had to lie flat out for six weeks with a neck brace on, we tried to explain but he could not understand anything we said to him which was heart-breaking.

    However, one day when we went to see him he started to eat a little bit and drink something off us and from that day everything was very positive! He was in hospital about 7 weeks then was taken back to his nursing home. He made a complete recovery!

    I think a lot of elderly people are much more resilient than we expect them to be so I will keep my fingers crossed for your loved one and I wish you all the best.

    Best wishes
    Rosie
     
  5. chrisdee

    chrisdee Registered User

    Nov 23, 2014
    171
    Yorkshire
    Thank you everyone for your useful replies. Mum is pretty resilient, so there is hope for a reasonable physical recovery. How her Alz. will be is another matter!
    To Witzend, I have read quite a few of your posts, thank you for your frankness. My Mum is not quite in the t.o.b. category, but not far off. Simply never had anything serious wrong with her until Alz. and a stubborn, non-listening personality. My thoughts are with you in present circumstances. All the best. Chrisdee.
     

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