1. Expert Q&A: Benefits - Weds 23 October, 3-4pm

    Our next expert Q&A will be on the topic of benefits. It will be hosted by Lauren from our Knowledge Services team. She'll be answering your questions on Wednesday 23 October between 3-4pm.

    You can either post your question >here< or email them to us at talkingpoint@alzheimers.org.uk and we'll be happy to ask them on your behalf.

More older carers 'risking health'

Discussion in 'Dementia-related news and campaigns' started by mojo1943, May 2, 2015.

  1. mojo1943

    mojo1943 Registered User

    Dec 19, 2013
    722
    North Devon
    The number of older carers in England is rising, with signs the pressures of looking after loved ones is damaging their health, research suggests.
    The warning by Age UK and Carers UK came as the charities released figures showing there were 1.2m carers over 65 - a 25% rise in the past decade.
    The biggest increase though has been seen in the over 85s, with the numbers more than doubling to 87,000.

    scary statistics..mo43


    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-32520410
     
  2. Pickles53

    Pickles53 Registered User

    Feb 25, 2014
    2,482
    Radcliffe on Trent
    Thanks for posting this link Mojo. Some of the other linked articles are worth a read too and the statistics do give an indication of the resources that will be needed if all these carers are to get the help they need.

    I so recognise the quote from the gentleman saying that 'he likes to be independent'. That was my FIL exactly. He wouldn't have any help and wouldn't even tell us for a long time how difficult things were with MIL. Sadly over the years he compromised his own health irretrievably, often refusing any treatment that would mean he couldn't be with MIL 24/7. When he finally accepted that he could no longer manage at home, MIL moved into a nursing home and he then could have treatment for his own problems. It was too late though, and eventually he moved into the same nursing home where he died just two week after his wife.
     
  3. Grey Lad

    Grey Lad Registered User

    Sep 12, 2014
    5,737
    North East Lincs
    A salutary tale. The Endless Hours Contract of Caring inevitably takes its toll. Disappointing that it is not one of the main election issues!
     
  4. mojo1943

    mojo1943 Registered User

    Dec 19, 2013
    722
    North Devon
    Hi Lads

    as always

    The train can only go as fast as the Engine...carers have to know and respect their own limits and always listen to what Nature tells them in terms of pain...mo43
     
  5. mojo1943

    mojo1943 Registered User

    Dec 19, 2013
    722
    North Devon
    Light Therapy for Better Sleep

    The benefits of lighting that helps us sleep, improves our mood, reduces depression, or makes us feel more alert on the job are, simply put, priceless. An expert from the Lighting Research Center and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute explains how to make light therapy successful in clinical settings.

    sound sleep is just what carers and their cared for need - in spades & looks like special light bulbs...mo43 :cool:

    http://www.sleepreviewmag.com/2015/05/light-therapy-better-sleep/?ref=cl-title
     
  6. Angela T

    Angela T Registered User

    Jul 13, 2014
    187
    France
    #6 Angela T, May 5, 2015
    Last edited: May 5, 2015
    I am in contact with the association "France Alzheimer's", and I was told that a recent survey has shown that 40% of carers die before the people they are caring for. This is not just for Alzheimer's I assume - but the figures are frightening, and since many spouses care for their partner until they are exhausted... it makes you think.

    This is a huge public health issue in the UK, Europe, the US - and I wonder when it will be addressed ???
     
  7. marionq

    marionq Registered User

    Apr 24, 2013
    5,860
    Female
    Scotland
    Our CPN told me the number of carers who have strokes is massive. I am trying hard not to be another statistic but it is not easy. After getting John's meds established so,that I now get a decent nights sleep I find that within a half hour of waking up I am at my wits end. He is either obsessing about going to church - Sunday used to be enough- or obsessing about going to work, phoning long dead employers, selecting tools for non existent work, or organising sandwiches to keep him going through the day. By the time he finally gets washed and dressed and eats his breakfast two hours have passed and I just want to run away!
     
  8. Angela T

    Angela T Registered User

    Jul 13, 2014
    187
    France
    Marion, no, it is not easy, not at all.

    If my husband developed Alzheimer's, I would no doubt do all I could to keep him at home, and care for him as best I could. That is what most spouses do - it is not the same with a parent who lives in their own home - but partners live together, and the decision to put your partner into a CH/NH must be almost impossible to take...

    Thinking of you...
     
  9. mojo1943

    mojo1943 Registered User

    Dec 19, 2013
    722
    North Devon
    mmm....Im doing my best ,as a carer with PCa up to my eyebrows - which are now falling out - and mrs mo43 with - VaD but mustn't grumble...mo43;)
     
  10. Spamar

    Spamar Registered User

    Oct 5, 2013
    6,976
    Suffolk
    Know it too well, Marionq, the longest was 4 hrs getting him up, breakfasted, showered and dressed. He's in respite with a view to permanent care at the moment and I just have so much time in the morning, I can't believe it!
     
  11. CLAIREDAY

    CLAIREDAY Account on hold

    Apr 22, 2015
    48
    I visited a care home about 2 years ago and spoke to a woman and she told me she was 72.
    I could tell she was not one of the residents as I had followed her in to the car park. She was driving.
    It turned out her mother was the care home resident and she had been caring for her mother until the previous month.
    I did not ask the mother's age but I can fully understand why the daughter could not cope.
    I can only assume the mother must have been in her 90's.
    The daughter said she was worried as she was older than some of the residents.


    Claire
     
  12. Rageddy Anne

    Rageddy Anne Registered User

    Feb 21, 2013
    5,990
    Cotswolds
    I'm 76, caring for my 76 year old husband. At 70 we were both in good health. What a difference Dementia makes.
     
  13. Silver Lining

    Silver Lining Registered User

    Nov 20, 2013
    224
    There was me thinking perhaps I could have my OH home as my visits to him in the CH/NH, are improving I have to remember how ill I felt when he went into care in Dec/Jan of this year and I had to have a Paramedic out to check me over whilst my OH was playing the guitar TO "HELP ME RELAX", I had to beg him to "let"me call 999because I felt so ill. (I have a pacemaker)

    Not his fault, but why do we think things may be better now?
     
  14. canary

    canary Registered User

    Feb 25, 2014
    10,569
    Female
    South coast
    From posts on here it seems as though many people improve once they are settled in a CH - Mum is one of these. I think the reason they improve though is because the care workers all get to go home at the end of their shift and can leave it all behind and they get regular holidays and sick leave. Consequently the residents get cared for by people who are not stressed, worn out and ill and can give them constant attention.
     
  15. Silver Lining

    Silver Lining Registered User

    Nov 20, 2013
    224
    I agree wholeheartedly - SL
     
  16. Grey Lad

    Grey Lad Registered User

    Sep 12, 2014
    5,737
    North East Lincs
    That is not at all surprising: the 'Endless Hours Contract of Caring' is not helpful to anyone. What a shame none of this has not featured in the General Election. Unfortunately, the Zero Hours Contact seems to have been the focus of most political parties.
     
  17. mojo1943

    mojo1943 Registered User

    Dec 19, 2013
    722
    North Devon
    Dementia expert Teepa Snow says caregivers should take a moment for themselves

    Respected dementia educator Teepa Snow has a message for caregivers: take time to take care of yourself.

    “This is incredibly stressful and challenging, and it gets more so as the disease progresses. You have to learn to take care of yourself and recognize you have needs. You can’t not need something,” she said. “You have to pause and make sure you’re doing OK.”

    Snow said there are resources out there to help, but caregivers will need to seek them out themselves.



    http://www.insidetoronto.com/news-s...regivers-should-take-a-moment-for-themselves/
     
  18. Bree

    Bree Registered User

    Oct 16, 2013
    241
    I always have to smile when I read what these 'experts' have to say. I often wonder if they have actual experience of caring themselves, or just talking to carers and making suggestions.

    When do we make time for ourselves ? Who gives help if we look for it ? How do we MAKE our charges accept strangers in our homes ? If I'm tired, worn out, fed up of the anguish and need a break, who will give it to me ? Oh all the advice is fine, it just can't happen.
     

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