1. maria40

    maria40 Registered User

    Feb 19, 2007
    1
    my mum has been in a care home for nearly 3 years now and had alzheimers for the past 8 years. She has recently developed mobility problems she is finding it hard to walk, she shuffles. i am finding this sudden decrease very hard to deal with. Would like some help in coping with this.
     
  2. Áine

    Áine Registered User

    hi maria ..... welcome to TP.

    it seems a big step when people start to lose the ability to move around. has mum been assessed for any aids? they can be a bit of a mixed blessing for people with dementia though ........ my dad never actually leaned on his walking stick, just waved it around in front of him, tripping himself and anyone else within a 3 yard radius :eek:
     
  3. Skye

    Skye Registered User

    Aug 29, 2006
    17,000
    SW Scotland
    Hi Maria

    Welcome to TP. It's so hard to watch the deterioration in the people we love. You're going to have to be very strong, and you'll find lots of support on TP.

    Love
     
  4. SHANDY

    SHANDY Registered User

    Jan 24, 2007
    26
    hi,

    my mom is in a nursing home with dementis, she has now started having mobility problems, if she comes to a wall or a chair, she has fogotten how to turn, so she stays there until someone helps her, she also shuffles from side to side when walking, it's very distressing to see, what the answer is i don't know.
    absolutely awful.


    keep the faith

    shandy
     
  5. Grannie G

    Grannie G Volunteer Moderator

    Apr 3, 2006
    69,850
    Kent
    Hi Maria and welcome to TP.

    It is so hard to witness such deterioration, as Hazel/Skye said. I`m sure it`s no consolation to you, but I think your mother`s done really well to keep her mobility till now.
    My mother was shuffling within 12 months of living in a NH and my husband is still at home with me, and shuffles now.
    It`s so different with all dementia sufferers as you can see.
    It`s heartbreaking I know, but unfortunately, loss of mobility is a recognized effect of Alzheimers.

    The only way to cope is to accept. It`s a tall order I know.

    Take care Sylvia
     
  6. Nell

    Nell Registered User

    Aug 9, 2005
    1,170
    Australia
    As people on TP always say, every AD patient seems to present differently.
    My Mum's mobility was one of the first things to deteriorate. She needs a walking frame now for moving around inside and to be taken anywhere, she needs a wheelchair. Mentally she has not deteriorated as fast. Because of this she can manage the walker quite well.

    Mum has good and bad days with mobility. On good days she can sometimes take a few steps on her own, and moves around with the walker with confidence. On bad days she clings to the walker and hangs over it, shuffling. As with anything with AD there seems to be no pattern to the good and bad days - so we never know what we'll find when we visit.

    I hope you can find a solution that works for your Mum. Best wishe, Nell
     
  7. Margarita

    Margarita Registered User

    Feb 17, 2006
    10,824
    london
    #7 Margarita, Feb 23, 2007
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2007
    Sounds like my mother Nell , but now my mother has taken a drop
    Mentally with sleeping lots , mind you she gave me a fright the other day in the kitchen when I turn around and they she was standing there one hand on wall , with no Zimmer frame , that must be what they call good day or good moment.

    I’ve just had a very bad time emotional, seeing this drop in mum also the day center notices it. I got some ant depression tablets, not saying that the answer to it , all cares handle it different , TP be a great support for me in pouring it all out and seeking counseling all helps
     
  8. Nell

    Nell Registered User

    Aug 9, 2005
    1,170
    Australia


    Dear Margarita,
    I think you are wise to try antidepression medication. It can make a BIG difference. Just remember that it takes a while to "kick in" so don't be surprised if you don't notice any difference for a couple of weeks.

    When I read your posts I often think you are my "guide" for AD! Our mothers seem so much alike! But your Mum is further along the path than mine, so your posts help me to "guess" what might come next. Mind you - just when I think I've sussed out my Mum's disease, she does something completely different!! It is a roller coaster ride, isn't it??

    Thinking of you and sending you my very best wishes for better days ahead. Nell
     
  9. Irish_Lisa

    Irish_Lisa Registered User

    Feb 24, 2007
    37
    N.Ireland
    My granddad had Alzheimer's for many years but never had mobility problems (apart from getting slower) until he went into hospital in July for a cancer operation. He spent a few weeks in ICU recovering and on leaving the ward we came to realise that he had completely forgotten how to walk. This was very distressing for all of us but you just have to stay strong....there's nothing else for it.

    Thinking of you. xx
     
  10. noelphobic

    noelphobic Registered User

    Feb 24, 2006
    3,452
    Liverpool
    That's interesting Lisa, although obviously very sad. My mum broke her hip and even though she did walk again a little bit after her op she is now in a wheelchair. She had very little physio and now you've made me think that the reason she didn't walk again may be that she also forgot how to, as much as it was about the effect of the broken hip. Sometimes now she makes movements as though she is going to get up and walk, as though she has forgotten that she can't walk. It is worrying in case she manages to get up far enough to fall.
     
  11. Irish_Lisa

    Irish_Lisa Registered User

    Feb 24, 2007
    37
    N.Ireland
    Every case is different, as I'm sure you more than well aware of but that's just our situation. Physio came into ICU after a week of bed rest and got him to stand etc. but when it came to actually walking......no amount of enticement or encouragement could get him to walk. He just seemed to suddenly forget how to put one foot in front of the other. We take so much for granted when you think about it.
     
  12. Grannie G

    Grannie G Volunteer Moderator

    Apr 3, 2006
    69,850
    Kent
    It does seem that stays in hospital result in deterioration. So many people have reported this.
    Whether it`s the trauma of the illness or condition that necessitated a hospital stay, or the actual stay, that causes the deterioration, is anybody`s guess, but it seems to happen a lot.
     
  13. Irish_Lisa

    Irish_Lisa Registered User

    Feb 24, 2007
    37
    N.Ireland
    I agree with you. :) After July my granddad had several more stays in hospital through pneumonia and other things.....every time he came out he had deteriorated at a surprising rate. First not walking, then not talking all of a sudden etc. etc.
     
  14. Margarita

    Margarita Registered User

    Feb 17, 2006
    10,824
    london
    Nell

    sure is a roller coaster
    What I hate is when I am living in it I forget that :rolleyes: , but then TP pops into my mind and I know that I am not the only one feeling like that .

    Wow spot on yes that happen to me also
    Thanks xx I really need to read that :)
     

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