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Mild cognitive impairment - cutting off things used to enjoy

Misty1001

Registered User
Aug 29, 2021
20
0
Mum has been diagnosed mild cognitive impairment however we due to lots of ither things happening feel like its further down the line

Now coming up with excuses and stopped interacting as much (not coming for tea etc) - and was a daily church goer and has suddenly stopped going - just wonderi g if anyone else has experienced similar?
 

SERENA50

Registered User
Jan 17, 2018
154
0
We are still waiting for a formal diagnosis but yes mild cognitive impairment has even mentioned and brain atrophy n Dad. Dad stopped coming our house for tea a few years ago, I would often pick him up only to have to turn around again when he became anxious. He has mobility problems now as well and it just became too much for him, as ,much as I would still love him to come. Apathy is another thing that comes too and goes and comes and sometimes despite best efforts you just have to go with it rather than try and change things. I just tend to go with his mood now it creates less stress for him to be fair and therefore us too. Take Care.
 

Jaded'n'faded

Registered User
Jan 23, 2019
3,393
0
High Peak
Yes - my mum was like that at first. She used to go to lots of different places shopping but cut it down so she'd only go to the place where she could get a bus door to door. Holidays or visits to places she was less familiar with went to. It became just one particular branch of M & S then straight home.

It got tricky because she used to do her big shop online and had done for a few years but she lost her ability to operate her computer. And Marks don't sell everything! But basically she stopped doing most things, anything outside her comfort zone or familiar routines because I think she had some awareness that she might get lost or whatever.
 

KTM65

New member
Jun 5, 2021
5
0
This definitely happened with my husband after he was diagnosed with MCI. He went into depression wholeheartedly which was really horrible to watch and live with. Although he is 73 I am much younger, 52 so I work still and need to. He felt the " book had closed" and there was nothing worth doing any more.
Between myself and some exceptional work colleagues and friends, we have managed to get MH into a routine of socializing, helping at my school, heading out with friends for walks and also to accompany him to his numerous hospital visits (he seems to feel aches and pains which didnt exist before the MCI diagnosis) .
To get to this stage of him being biddable to do things and eat food which are beneficial in reducing the rate of brain shrinkage and also be sociable its been a very tough and wearing journey of 9 months.
 

Misty1001

Registered User
Aug 29, 2021
20
0
Sorry to hear what you and your husband are going through sounds like you have a lovely routine for you both though
 

Jerac

Registered User
Dec 10, 2020
16
0
This definitely happened with my husband after he was diagnosed with MCI. He went into depression wholeheartedly which was really horrible to watch and live with. Although he is 73 I am much younger, 52 so I work still and need to. He felt the " book had closed" and there was nothing worth doing any more.
Between myself and some exceptional work colleagues and friends, we have managed to get MH into a routine of socializing, helping at my school, heading out with friends for walks and also to accompany him to his numerous hospital visits (he seems to feel aches and pains which didnt exist before the MCI diagnosis) .
To get to this stage of him being biddable to do things and eat food which are beneficial in reducing the rate of brain shrinkage and also be sociable its been a very tough and wearing journey of 9 months.
This seems so familiar. I am glad you have got your husband to take part in some activities again. I am working to do this for mine (who is 74) but it seems like an uphill slog! I have never made so many hospital visits since his diagnosis for his various ailments!
 

DreamsAreReal

Registered User
Oct 17, 2015
424
0
I don’t think Mild Cognitive Impairment is a particularly helpful description for someone with dementia. Maybe it means something else to a trained medic, but IMO, there’s nothing mild about it.

Mum’s Alzheimer Society support worker gave me the Council Tax discount form which clearly states it is for Severe mental impairment! I queried it with her (in view of mum’s diagnosis of Mild Mixed Dementia), and I can’t remember now exactly what she said, but she confirmed that mild dementia can be severe mental impairment. Confusing.
 

SERENA50

Registered User
Jan 17, 2018
154
0
I don’t think Mild Cognitive Impairment is a particularly helpful description for someone with dementia. Maybe it means something else to a trained medic, but IMO, there’s nothing mild about it.

Mum’s Alzheimer Society support worker gave me the Council Tax discount form which clearly states it is for Severe mental impairment! I queried it with her (in view of mum’s diagnosis of Mild Mixed Dementia), and I can’t remember now exactly what she said, but she confirmed that mild dementia can be severe mental impairment. Confusing.
Hi

mmm I find it confusing since mild impairment, what does that even mean? Someone said the other day for example mild covid infection to a medical professional means not ending up in hospital but doesn't mean that you won't be really ill or have long covid or other issues. Maybe to a medical person mild cognitive impairment means something different. We were told Dad had some brain atrophy (still waiting for all the test results) which is parts of the brain shrinking I think but I have never found out which parts and how that might affect him day to day. We can work some things out ourselves but maybe I should ask more questions next time. I agree with you though how can you have a severe mental impairment that is mild mixed dementia very confusing.