1. STILEISH

    STILEISH Registered User

    May 2, 2008
    2
    Burgess Hill
    I am working as part of our Carer's group on a training project for the Royal College of Psychiatrists. The objective is to input some Carers' perspectives into the course material. The course, which will be run for the first time on the 30th May as a pilot, is all about the Deprivation of Liberties Safeguards which will be an addition to the Mental Capacity Act 2005.

    I am trying to talk with a carer who has recently had experience with the assessment of mental capacity of the person they care for to gain some feel for what actually happened. Any information gathered will of course be treated as confidential, only used in a general fashion and with the carer's permission.

    I can perhaps explain more fully if necessary. Thank you.
     
  2. citybythesea

    citybythesea Registered User

    Mar 23, 2008
    632
    coast of texas
    If your project works over there..send it to our shores please. I wish I could help you but I'm in the wrong country. Good luck!!!!!!!!!!!!
     
  3. STILEISH

    STILEISH Registered User

    May 2, 2008
    2
    Burgess Hill
    Hi there, thanks for your response. Am I right in assuming you don't have a Mental Capacity Act where you are? This is very relevant to people with dementia and their carers and will hopefully improve their lot.
     
  4. citybythesea

    citybythesea Registered User

    Mar 23, 2008
    632
    coast of texas
    there are laws over here, the main difference is the way the medical systems are set up.....I have more control over her medical and every day care....insurance companies are our pain in the necks. We have the HIPAA which controls who has access to and who does not get to see medical records. I have both her medical and her durable power of attorney.

    As for mental capacity tests from what I gather I think the dr's may use the same test.

    With mom being home care it really is up to me to make sure everything goes the way it should. As for sitting down and having plans those are more in effect when the government gets involved and even those are just paper.

    Most hospitals are not set up for AD patients. A caretaker ends up staying and making sure that feeding is done properly. The medical system is really quite understaffed and underpaid over here. Problem is that some of the people in that field are in for the money and don't care about the caring side.. I'm sure even over there that happens. I hope I answered your question
     
  5. citybythesea

    citybythesea Registered User

    Mar 23, 2008
    632
    coast of texas
    When the government gets involved over here and a social worker has to get involved you pray that you get one that is not overloaded with work and cares.....otherwise there are cracks for some to fall thru...for the government to be involved over here you are indigent....otherwise you are over 65 and on retirement insurance, medicare....not to be confused with medicaid which is for the less fortunate.

    I hope you understand what I am saying, but for the government to solely have a place for the dementia patient in the government you are looking at severe problems because it just has not been addressed with that part of the system.
     

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