1. Cate

    Cate Registered User

    Jul 2, 2006
    1,370
    Newport, Gwent
    After mum’s heart attack early in May, she was prescribed medication to keep her stable, and everything seemed to be going fine. The staff at the NH reported that she still spat out / hid the medication if they didn’t watch her carefully, but they were managing it OK.

    I go off to Greece for a much looked forward to break on the 25 June. Half way through the holiday, I get a message from the NH. Totally panic stricken and thinking the worse (my brother had asked them not to contact me, but to contact him or my son should any problems arise). I eventually manage to get hold of my son. Mum was refusing all medication.

    The doctor had been and spent about an hour with her trying to explain the importance of taking the medication, my brother and son had also spent time with her trying to persuade her. The upshot is, she is now not taking the Digoxin for her heart, the Frusemide for the fluid on her lungs, iron tablets for her blood count, and the Aricept. Oh yes, and if she can stuff a load of biscuits she will, which is doing her Diabetes no good at all.

    I have spoken to her GP today who tells me she is, at the moment, fine. She has absolutely no memory of the heart attack, her stay in hospital etc., etc., She has told them all, she is fine, and they can b…….r off with their tablets!!

    We have always struggled to get her to take the Aricept, mum didn’t want to become a ‘drug addict’ (at the age of 89).:eek:

    So now it’s back to living on a knife edge knowing that she is not doing herself any good at all not taking the medication.

    Fingers crossed please everybody that she will resume taking her meds again soon, very soon.

    Love

    Cate
     
  2. Nell

    Nell Registered User

    Aug 9, 2005
    1,170
    Australia
    Oh dear Cate! You just did NOT need this, especialy in the middle of your trip to
    Greece. Can't offer any suggestions or advice - just hope that your Mum suddenly starts taking her medication again.

    She has told them all, she is fine, and they can b…….r off with their tablets!!
    I'm sorry if it seems inappropriate but I can't help smiling at this fiesty old lady standing up for her rights NOT to take her tablets if she so chooses!!

    Thinking of you - and keeping my fingers crossed!
     
  3. Cate

    Cate Registered User

    Jul 2, 2006
    1,370
    Newport, Gwent
    Hi Nell

    I'm sorry if it seems inappropriate but I can't help smiling at this fiesty old lady standing up for her rights NOT to take her tablets if she so chooses!!

    I have to admitt, I didn't know whether to laugh or cry, I did both.:eek: 'Fiesty old lady', you got it in one, she is fiesty alright.

    Thank you for keeping your fingers crossed.

    Love

    Cate
     
  4. Grannie G

    Grannie G Volunteer Moderator

    Apr 3, 2006
    68,652
    Kent
    #4 Grannie G, Jul 14, 2007
    Last edited: Jul 14, 2007
    Hi Cate,

    If your mother believes there is nothing wrong with her, I can understand why she doean`t want to take medication.

    If she has forgotten her past history, and now feels fine, she must think it`s unnecessary.

    My husband often says he`s better now and doesn`t need all this `rubbish`. I can persuade him by saying it`s the medication that keeps him well. It doesn`t always work, but does sometimes. Do you think it might work with your mother?

    Love xx
     
  5. Taffy

    Taffy Registered User

    Apr 15, 2007
    1,314
    Hi Cate
    I hope for your own peace of mind that your mum starts taking her meds, my own mum is anti medication also. Mum has been fortunate that, not until her late seventies she needed medication for her bones, which she took for a short while then decided she wasn't taking anymore, and she never.Mum does have a anti-depressant each day and has to be coaxed to have it. Mum always says "No-one took tablets when we were growing up and everyone was fine." maybe it's a carry over from the past.I do understand your concerns and hope all goes well.Taffy.
     
  6. Cate

    Cate Registered User

    Jul 2, 2006
    1,370
    Newport, Gwent
    Hi Sylvia and Taffy

    Thanks for your replies.

    My husband often says he`s better now and doesn`t need all this `rubbish`. I can persuade him by saying it`s the medication that keeps him well. It doesn`t always work, but does sometimes. Do you think it might work with your mother?

    Sylvia we have tried everything, she just has an adversion to taking medication, and to be fair, always has. I think you have a very valid point Taffy:

    "No-one took tablets when we were growing up and everyone was fine."

    Her memory is now so far back, she thinks every time she sees the doctor, she should pay him, so we are back there pre NHS days.

    The problem is, what ever reason we give, which she will sometimes accept at the time, is gone within 5 minutes, sometimes repeating the reason will work, but now we seem to have hit a brick wall.

    You wouldn't believe the fibs I tell her:

    Her NH fees are free because she worked until 65

    The doctor is free because she never used them before

    No we didn't call the doctor, because she is over 80 he will get into trouble with the law if he didn't see her

    The cook will get into trouble with his boss if she eats the sugary stuff

    and so it goes on, I just hope that when my times comes to produce myself at the Pearly Gates I will be forgiven.

    Love

    Cate xxx
     
  7. mel

    mel Registered User

    Apr 30, 2006
    1,656
    Sheffield
    Hi Cate

    This sounds so familiar!!

    Mum often refused to take her medication........I suppose I was lucky in the fact that , at her most stubborn, she would take it from my 12 year old son.

    In hospital they tried to give her medication in liquid form.....but it's not possible to get all manner of drugs in liquid form I believe.

    It's very frustrating isn't it......mum was also very suspicious.....in her eyes she wasn't ill ....so why should she take tablets?:confused: :confused:
     
  8. twink

    twink Registered User

    Oct 28, 2005
    265
    Cambridgeshire UK
    Think I've mentioned this before Cate, the staff at Steve's home asked me to write a letter to the GP giving my permission for them to put his drugs in his food as he was was refusing to take them sometimes. When he refuses to take it, they do this and it works well.

    Sue
     
  9. Cate

    Cate Registered User

    Jul 2, 2006
    1,370
    Newport, Gwent
    Hi Sue

    Oooooeeerrrr:eek: I thought doing this was assault, and dangerous, what if mum says "here Florrie have a bit of my sponge pudding". Good on you if you managed to get the GP and NH to agree to this, but I really dont think mum's NH will.

    We had a case in work whereby a mum was giving her sons Methylphenidate in his sandwiches, came out he used to do swopes with his mate..........all hell broke out:eek:

    Thanks for the tip though.

    Love

    Cate
     
  10. twink

    twink Registered User

    Oct 28, 2005
    265
    Cambridgeshire UK
    Hi Cate,

    It was the staff at the home who approached me and asked if I would agree to them putting meds into his food as he gets agitated and aggressive if he won't take them. I sat and wrote the letter to the GP in the office. I would hope that when they have to do this, they supervise till he's eaten whatever they are in. He doesn't share or offer his food with anyone, he does sit and eat his own and there does always seem to be staff standing around while they eat. They did tell me that if they tried to give his drugs to him without my permission it's classed as assault.

    Sue
     
  11. glyn

    glyn Registered User

    Nov 23, 2006
    30
    Hi,

    We have been giving mam her medication in drink cartons i.e. Ribena or orange juice, and we crush the tablets. She takes this really easy 3 times a day. She refused point blank to take her tablets and this was the only option we had. Since being admitted to hospital some weeks ago they have continued with this system and it still works fine.
     

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