• We're currently experiencing technical issues with our newsletter software, so our Dementia Talking Point monthly updates have been put on hold for now. We hope to restart the newsletter soon.

    Find out more >here<.

Maybe, just maybe, a tiny spark of hope?

Jud4u

Registered User
Dec 7, 2015
1
High-fat diet

The New Scientist posted an article in their issue of 28 November spelling out how a high-fat diet used to control epilepsy affects the brain and stating that it could be used for the control of Alzheimer's. Could the recent increase in the diagnosis of Alzheimer's possibly be due to the low fat diet that many people have been encouraged to follow in recent years?
 

Essie

Registered User
Feb 11, 2015
563
It's an interesting point, certainly low fat foods are often very much higher in sugar than the standard version - fat tastes nice and the lack of fat has to be compensated for in terms of how something tastes so up goes the sugar content and sugar is a much bigger enemy than fat in terms of general health and weight.

Thanks for the link Lady A - my goodness if it is the breakthrough it seems to be it will be a momentous turning point in the way this dreadful disease has affected so many.

Everything crossed that this works out.
 

count2ten

Registered User
Dec 13, 2013
186
Yes, the brain needs fat to function (there's also a lot of interesting research on coconut oil and dementia)..... so why are they always dishing out these statins and advising people to cut out all the fat in their diet? I'm sure my mum was fine before she started taking all these drugs, cut out butter and oil.... and also stopped eating oily fish, broccoli and offal because she was on warfarin.
 
Last edited:

LadyA

Registered User
Oct 19, 2009
13,631
Ireland
Yes, the brain needs fat to function (there's also a lot of interesting research on coconut oil and dementia)..... so why are they always dishing out these statins and advising people to cut out all the fat in their diet? I'm sure my mum was fine before she started taking all these drugs, cut out butter and oil.... and also stopped eating oily fish, broccoli and offal because she was on warfarin.
My late husband's GP was ahead of the posse on a lot of things! Years ago he read something in some remote journal about the possible benefits of coconut oil - long before it became so popular - and got me to start William on it, to see if it had any affect on the progression of his dementia. Sadly, there was no discernible affect for him, anyway.
 

gringo

Registered User
Feb 1, 2012
1,189
UK.
Hello LadyA
It is easy to be cynical about these new discoveries,
but one day the breakthrough will come.
Yes, one day!! It’s not really a question of being cynical Jimbo. For me, these reports are like an intense form of Chinese water torture.
 

realist1234

Registered User
Oct 30, 2014
108
I doubt it given that many elderly people today tended to eat a normal diet, with no ready-meals etc. My parents typically ate meat/fish,potatoes and veg for the main meal, and a variety of desserts incl cream buns! Both were normal weights, but my mum went on to develop Alzheimer's. About the only correlating factor with my mum was her being a rather anxious person which recent research indicates may be a factor in developing the disease.

I was interested in the Uni of South Florida's trial on Coconut Oil, but after enquiring it now seems they have had a hard time recruiting volunteers and if it ever gets off the ground it may be 2 years before any results are published, but there is a distinct possibility that it will not complete.



The New Scientist posted an article in their issue of 28 November spelling out how a high-fat diet used to control epilepsy affects the brain and stating that it could be used for the control of Alzheimer's. Could the recent increase in the diagnosis of Alzheimer's possibly be due to the low fat diet that many people have been encouraged to follow in recent years?
 
Last edited:

realist1234

Registered User
Oct 30, 2014
108
I thought researchers had already tried removing Amyloid plaques and tau proteins using drugs in previous trials, but found simply removing them had no real effect on patients - humans not mice.