• We're currently experiencing technical issues with our newsletter software, so our Dementia Talking Point monthly updates have been put on hold for now. We hope to restart the newsletter soon.

    Find out more >here<.

Manuka Honey

stanleypj

Registered User
Dec 8, 2011
10,708
North West
My wife Sue has a pressure sore - her first. It has now been present for 10 days. The Nursing Home where she is a resident have referred her to the local tissue viability service. No indication about when they might respond. In the meantime she is being kept off her bottom as much as possible and the sore is protected with a dressing (not adhesive).

Various people have suggested Manuka Honey which I have known about and used previously. The problem is that I can't just buy it and apply it. Well, I could, obviously, but I'm pretty sure this could cause a big problem with the NH. I will ask them about it.

Has anyone else used MH for this purpose in a care home?

Thanks for reading.
 

jenniferpa

Registered User
Jun 27, 2006
39,448
I'm not sure if they are 1) available over the counter or 2) available in the UK but there are manuka honey impregnated dressings available which might be easier to get the home to use.
 

stanleypj

Registered User
Dec 8, 2011
10,708
North West
I'm not sure if they are 1) available over the counter or 2) available in the UK but there are manuka honey impregnated dressings available which might be easier to get the home to use.
Many thanks Jennifer. They are available in the UK and am planning to ask the home, and the visiting GP if I can, about them.
 

nitram

Registered User
Apr 6, 2011
20,651
North Manchester
"The Nursing Home where she is a resident have referred her to the local tissue viability service. No indication about when they might respond."

Somewhat OT
In my area a referral by a GP, especially the initial referral, to TV nursing has a fast response, usually the next day unless the dreaded week ends and bank holidays are involved.

If you contact the GP about Manuka Honey you could chase up the referral.

IMHO any pressure sore needs expert advice on treatment and prevention of further sores.
 

Sue J

Registered User
Dec 9, 2009
8,035
Hi Stanley

Sorry to read that Sue has a pressure sore.:( A was speaking to a nurse friend recently who was wondering about manuka dressings for her mother's weeping legs but was advised that they are only used if there is infection present.

I agree with Nitram,
IMHO any pressure sore needs expert advice on treatment and prevention of further sores
. In my experience also, if there is a proper regime, to prevent pressure sores, in place, it is the same regime that will enable the healing of any current sores e.g. nursing in bed with regularly 2 hrly turning to allow a sacral sore to heal and or/ ensuring only left seated for minimal length of time e.g. 30 mins.

If Sue is in a Nursing Home there must be a Registered Nurse who should understand about assessing for tissue viability and have practices in place to prevent sores, it is basic nursing care. I hope the home will be able to discuss an action plan with you in the interim of assessment from a tissue viability nurse.

Hope it improves soon with or without honey.

Love
Sue:)
 

nitram

Registered User
Apr 6, 2011
20,651
North Manchester
"... nursing in bed with regularly 2 hrly turning to allow a sacral sore to heal and or/ ensuring only left seated for minimal length of time e.g. 30 mins...."

Reducing the pressure on susceptible parts of the body is only part of the treatment/assessment, the TV service should take an overall view.

Increased risk
There are several factors that increase the risk of developing pressure ulcers. These include:
● mobility problems – anything that affects your ability to move some or all of your body
● poor nutrition – for your skin to remain healthy, it requires nutrients that can only be supplied by eating a nutritious diet
● an underlying health condition that disrupts your blood supply or makes your skin more vulnerable to injury and damage
● being over 70 years old
● urinary incontinence and/or bowel incontinence
● serious mental health conditions

These are discussed in more detail below.


http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/Pressure-ulcers/Pages/Causes.aspx
 

stanleypj

Registered User
Dec 8, 2011
10,708
North West
"The Nursing Home where she is a resident have referred her to the local tissue viability service. No indication about when they might respond."

Somewhat OT
In my area a referral by a GP, especially the initial referral, to TV nursing has a fast response, usually the next day unless the dreaded week ends and bank holidays are involved.

If you contact the GP about Manuka Honey you could chase up the referral.

IMHO any pressure sore needs expert advice on treatment and prevention of further sores.
Many thanks nitram. I hope you're right. Didn't get to see the GP but mentioned manuka to lead nurse C and she said the sore was healing and she was about to try another dressing that they use. She didn't rule it out.
 

stanleypj

Registered User
Dec 8, 2011
10,708
North West
Hi Stanley

Sorry to read that Sue has a pressure sore.:( A was speaking to a nurse friend recently who was wondering about manuka dressings for her mother's weeping legs but was advised that they are only used if there is infection present.

I agree with Nitram, . In my experience also, if there is a proper regime, to prevent pressure sores, in place, it is the same regime that will enable the healing of any current sores e.g. nursing in bed with regularly 2 hrly turning to allow a sacral sore to heal and or/ ensuring only left seated for minimal length of time e.g. 30 mins.

If Sue is in a Nursing Home there must be a Registered Nurse who should understand about assessing for tissue viability and have practices in place to prevent sores, it is basic nursing care. I hope the home will be able to discuss an action plan with you in the interim of assessment from a tissue viability nurse.

Hope it improves soon with or without honey.

Love
Sue:)
Many thanks Sue. They have said an hour and a half out in the w/chair is OK (that's about the amount of time it takes to get through the evening meal). There are normally several Reg Nurses on duty. I still think the starting point was the hospital appt fiasco when Sue was, quite unnecessarily in the w/chair fro about 6 hours. The mark which developed into a sore was spotted a week later.

Sue has amazing skin. Everyone comments on it. She never had any kind of sores when we were looking after her at home, only about 6 months ago. We did always use medihoney on her skin after a clean-up or when she'd been on the commode. We never turned her either. This is another thing I must raise.
 

stanleypj

Registered User
Dec 8, 2011
10,708
North West
"... nursing in bed with regularly 2 hrly turning to allow a sacral sore to heal and or/ ensuring only left seated for minimal length of time e.g. 30 mins...."

Reducing the pressure on susceptible parts of the body is only part of the treatment/assessment, the TV service should take an overall view.

Increased risk
There are several factors that increase the risk of developing pressure ulcers. These include:
● mobility problems – anything that affects your ability to move some or all of your body
● poor nutrition – for your skin to remain healthy, it requires nutrients that can only be supplied by eating a nutritious diet
● an underlying health condition that disrupts your blood supply or makes your skin more vulnerable to injury and damage
● being over 70 years old
● urinary incontinence and/or bowel incontinence
● serious mental health conditions

These are discussed in more detail below.


http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/Pressure-ulcers/Pages/Causes.aspx
Obviously all those things apply in Sue's case (except perhaps the blood supply one and the poor nutrition - it's only poor in the sense that we need her to eat more).
 

di65

Registered User
Feb 28, 2013
775
new zealand
Please be aware that there are now many countries claiming to have "Manuka Honey", but the only true version comes from New Zealand. Check the country of origin label on the container.
The manuka bush is native to NZ, making it a unique product, but sadly other countries are now trying to cash in on the medicinal properties. It's also yummy to eat:D
 

Lawson58

Registered User
Aug 1, 2014
2,165
Victoria, Australia
Hi di65,

I see that you are a kiwi but Manuka honey comes from a plant called leptospermum scoparium which is a native of both New Zealand and Australia so it is not quite right to say that the only genuine Manuka honey comes from NZ. Both countries produce real Manuka honey though it is dreadfully expensive now because of all the attention it is being given at the moment.

Other types of honey can be used a simple first aid dressing for minor cuts and things, especially for sensitive skin, being sure that there are no allergies of course.
 

stanleypj

Registered User
Dec 8, 2011
10,708
North West
Please try Medihoney Barrier Cream available from GP or over the counter.
It works for us.
Many thanks Del. We always used Medihoney when Sue was at home. She had no pressure sores then. There are tubes of medihoney in the room but I don't think it's being used all the time. I need to remind the carers.