1. Lynne68

    Lynne68 Registered User

    Mar 3, 2016
    27
    I struggled for over 5 years has my husband gradually succumbed to Alzhiemers. I had no help from any authorities? Last August I arranged for me to have respite for 2 weeks at £5000 plus monthly fee. My husband deteriorated whilst residing in residential care-it was then impossible for me to look after him at home. We are still paying over £5000 a month for his care. Although he cannot be cared for at home we have been refused any funding. He is inlcontanent, he has to be helped to wash and dress, cry’s 3-4 times a week, has trouble using cutlery and eating, his feet are very swollen and his speech is also affected. This illness is life limiting and terminal but the NHS or government are not listening? I rest my case
     
  2. BluTinks

    BluTinks Registered User

    Dec 7, 2018
    39
    Try attendance allowance
     
  3. Cat27

    Cat27 Volunteer Moderator

    Feb 27, 2015
    10,039
    Merseyside
    Have you had a financial assessment done?
    If you are self funding, do you claim attendance allowance for your husband?
     
  4. Lynne68

    Lynne68 Registered User

    Mar 3, 2016
    27
    Yes he does receive attendance allowance . A financial assessment was carried out three months ago but it was declined because my husband is not ‘unwell’ enough!
    Thank you for getting back to me.
     
  5. Cat27

    Cat27 Volunteer Moderator

    Feb 27, 2015
    10,039
    Merseyside
    Was that a Continuing Health Care (CHC) assessment or a local authority one?
     
  6. Lynne68

    Lynne68 Registered User

    Mar 3, 2016
    27
    Yes it was the Continuing Health Care assessment assessment.
     
  7. Rosettastone57

    Rosettastone57 Registered User

    Oct 27, 2016
    911
    My mother-in-law was paying £5400 a month last year in a dementia unit in a care home. I didn't bother with continuing health care, because from what I had read, she wouldn't have been eligible anyway . Her needs were social ,help with eating, dressing, etc. She was completely self funding and I didn't involve SS , because in our area, they wouldn't have been particularly interested. I started the process of selling her house, as her attorney to cover the fees in the long term. My husband and I had worked out she had about 5 years of self funding before we would have had to approach the local authority. As it happened, she passed away after a couple of months in care. She was 93.
    I empathize with you, I assume your husband is self funding? I'm not sure what the answer is, something should change
     
  8. Cat27

    Cat27 Volunteer Moderator

    Feb 27, 2015
    10,039
    Merseyside
    Have you asked for a local authority financial assessment? Does your husband have over £23,250? If not ask for an assessment.
     
  9. Jaded'n'faded

    Jaded'n'faded Registered User

    Jan 23, 2019
    387
    Female
    High Peak
    Mum's care has cost her £120 grand so far. o_O I'd say she has several years left (but who knows?)

    We are all in the same boat. :(
     
  10. Lynne68

    Lynne68 Registered User

    Mar 3, 2016
    27
    He
    He 77 and he is self funded at the at the moment.
     
  11. Lynne68

    Lynne68 Registered User

    Mar 3, 2016
    27
    At the moment he has above the £23,250 but it going down fast.
     
  12. Alex54

    Alex54 Registered User

    Oct 15, 2018
    138
    Male
    Newtown, Wales
    A care home does not suit everybody, I know my wife (PWD) did not function well in a nursing home for respite and basically just shut down. As soon as she came home she went back to her normal self.
    Have you considered getting help to support your husband at home, how much would a live-in carer cost?
    Our first point of call was the GP but I would talk to your local Alzheimer's branch and see what they can do.
     
  13. Lynne68

    Lynne68 Registered User

    Mar 3, 2016
    27
    I
    He had a spell in hospital and was discharged with 8 days of care. He would not cooperate and their twice daily visits were a waste of time. I’m not in the best of health myself having broken my back twice in the last 18 months. My husband had very challenging behaviour and I became unable to cope.
    Thank you for your response
     
  14. Sirena

    Sirena Registered User

    Feb 27, 2018
    1,414
    Female
    As others have said, because your husband requires social care rather than health care, the NHS does not cover the cost. And as Jaded said, we are all in the same boat. My mother self-funds her care and will continue to do so until she only has £23k left. She has been in a care home for nearly 18 months and while it's expensive (£3400 a month) she gets brilliant care. I hope she does not outlive her funds as the care then may be rather less brilliant.
     
  15. Alex54

    Alex54 Registered User

    Oct 15, 2018
    138
    Male
    Newtown, Wales
    I am relatively young and in good health, looking after a loved one with dementia is hard and totally demanding. A minor illness would most likely tip me over, never mind what you have been through.
    I still think social services and other organisations should be doing more to help you and your husband.
     
  16. Shedrech

    Shedrech Volunteer Moderator

    Dec 15, 2012
    7,738
    Yorkshire
    hi @Lynne68
    do contact your Local Authority Adult Services to arrange a financial assessment re your husband's care fees

    I am a little concerned that you say 'we' are paying as his care fees should be paid from your husband's income and savings/assets only, which includes half of any savings in joint names (but not your home as this is disregarded) .... so it may be worth looking carefully at both your finances and separating them out

    these pages on the main AS site may help
    https://www.alzheimers.org.uk/get-support/legal-financial/who-pays-care
     
  17. Helly68

    Helly68 Registered User

    Mar 12, 2018
    371
    I echo Shedrech.

    My father paid for my mothers care for some time, because we erroneously thought that we were being assessed on both their savings, not individual assets. Check who owns any property.
    My father was afraid of having a financial assessment, I persevered, and we now get council funding and they are backdating money to when we made the application.
    Councils do state, in the small print, the assessment criteria, but it isn't well known by people new to the situation and the sums involved are truly eye-watering. Sadly the council financial assessment process is not the clearest, in terms of how they do their calculations but it is wise to check, at least you may know when your PWD savings reach the cut off point.
     
  18. Lynne68

    Lynne68 Registered User

    Mar 3, 2016
    27
    Thank you to all who responded to my blog. It’s good to talk and to know you’re not alone trying to cope with this dreadful illness.
     

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