1. Lyndylou

    Lyndylou Registered User

    Dec 19, 2014
    3
    Surrey
    Hi, it's my first post- mum has had Alzheimer's for 4 years now. On arricept and not doing too badly however our biggest problem seems to the personal hygiene. She thinks she has washed when we know she hasn't, if I offer to help her she often refuses and the Carers we have often have the same problem. She is reluctant to change her underwear and will wear the same clothes for days. She used to be so particular.... Does anybody have any suggestions on how we can all deal with this? Thanks
     
  2. CJinUSA

    CJinUSA Registered User

    Jan 20, 2014
    1,126
    eastern USA
    This might sound odd, but have you considered inviting her to take a shower with you? If you did this once or twice, it might help her enjoy the shower more. I have read that those with dementia can become afraid of the splashing water. Would it be possible to bathe her in a bathtub where you might use nice smelling soap, etc.?

    We have sort of the opposite issue here. My mother's carers have pampered her the way I did when I showered her. Lots of skin lotion, all sorts of loving touches and care - she loves having us fuss over her. But showering is hard on her old skin, which is prone to dry out, and so the doctor recommended showering every other day. I think if a nice friendly fuss could be made over your mother, it might feel less an imposition. And if it's that she is afraid of the water splashing on her, then perhaps a bath might be considered.

    There are many on the site who have faced this issue. I hope someone comes along soon with suggestions for you.
     
  3. Lyndylou

    Lyndylou Registered User

    Dec 19, 2014
    3
    Surrey
    Hi CJ
    Unfortunately mum has degenerative arthritis of the spine so her mobility is also very poor. Sitting by the sink on a perching stool is what she finds easiest, I am seriously considering installing a bath with a side opening for her. Pretty sure it is nothing to do with being afraid of water... She just thinks she has washed when she hasn't!
     
  4. loveahug

    loveahug Registered User

    Nov 28, 2012
    1,071
    Moved to Leicester
    The only way to get mum clean is to sit her in the walk in shower and take down the shower head; she happily sprays the water on herself and then uses a flannel and shower cream to wash with. We usually manage this about every 10 days. As the shower has a seat (which I cover with another flannel to stop it feeling cold) she feels safe and warm. The cubicle replaced the bath but only has half height doors and a shower curtain so I can assist without water getting everywhere.

    I hope this helps....
     
  5. nitram

    nitram Registered User

    Apr 6, 2011
    19,021
    Male
    North Manchester
    "...I am seriously considering installing a bath with a side opening for her..."

    If you go this route make sure that you have a good temperature control on the tap used to fill it, the person is in the bath all the time it is being filled.

    Also note that the person has to stay in the bath whilst the water drains away.
     
  6. 2jays

    2jays Registered User

    Jun 4, 2010
    11,603
    West Midlands
    I have had experience of using this type of bath to bathe someone. All I can say is.... Don't go there. Don't get one.

    If modesty is an issue, make a poncho out of a large bath sheet and shower over the towel. Leave underwear on if it's a battle to remove it before the shower.... It, most times, will get taken off by who is being showered when it's time to get dry.

    Bathing is such a battle issue that actually so long as "bits" are refreshed, a total body wash isn't needed very often.

    When I was young you were considered odd if you had more than one bath every fortnight. A wipe round the "bits" and a face wash was enough. I'm really not that old.... But I do remember when colour telly was invented.... So maybe I'm not as young as I think I am :D







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