1. Avis

    Avis Registered User

    Nov 2, 2019
    62
    My husband gets lost in the house. He will sleep for hours, day and night then wake up quite disorientated. He was leaning on the kitchen counter this afternoon (he can only walk a few steps) and asked me where he was, He knew he was in a kitchen but had no idea where the bench was. Anyway he sat down again after I reassured him and went to sleep. Another thing he can't do now is tell the time. He flips the sides over so that a 9 becomes a 3 etc. While he sleeps I get very lonely so this forum is a godsend.
     
  2. LynneMcV

    LynneMcV Volunteer Moderator

    May 9, 2012
    3,637
    south-east London
    Many on here will understand your feeling of loneliness @Avis - and I am glad that you have found this forum. It will definitely help.

    I remember feeling isolated on many occasions myself. For several years we got out and about to socialise quite a lot - but as the disease progressed, the more my husband and I became confined to our own home - and it was not always a home my husband recognised (though fortunately he was generally accepting of it because I was here with him).

    I was also lucky that, even though there were many hours of little interaction during the day while he slept more and more, I did know that our son and daughter would eventually be back home overnight. Just knowing someone else was in the house was reassuring in itself, even if they were also asleep!

    I can only imagine how much more isolated I would have felt had I been totally on my own with the situation. Even so, being able to come on here in those quiet hours and talk to people who understood the complexities involved with dementia, as well as the challenges of caring for someone with dementia, was what helped keep me going through the darkest times.

    Keep posting, there is always someone around who has gone through similar or will be going through it with you - and just knowing that in itself, often helps lessen the feeling of loneliness :)
     
  3. Grannie G

    Grannie G Volunteer Moderator

    Apr 3, 2006
    69,850
    Kent
    Hello Avis.

    My husband also got lost in our very small bungalow. He would stand at the living room door and look left and right not knowing which way to go. It was sad to see.

    It is very lonely being a full time carer. I remember Dementia Talking Point being my main form of social interaction especially when my husband was sleeping.

    Is it possible you could get anyone to sit with your husband for an hour or so, just so you could get out and have a coffee somewhere in the real world.

    The Alzheimer`s Society has a Side by Side facility which might enable you to have some time for yourself.

    If you insert your post code here, there might be some facilities available in your area.

    https://www.alzheimers.org.uk/get-support/your-support-services
     
  4. Avis

    Avis Registered User

    Nov 2, 2019
    62
    It is so nice to know that others have been through this and have come out the other side reasonably sane. My husband would not get out of bed until 11am, he had lunch at noon and now he is asleep again. If he wakes and I am no where in sight he gets upset and agitated. It is so confining. Thank you for your kind, supportive words.
     
  5. Avis

    Avis Registered User

    Nov 2, 2019
    62
    Thank you for your suggestions. Hubby gets very agitated if he wakes and I am not in sight. He became very abusive and upset when he woke yesterday and he could not see me. (I was in the laundry ironing). He hates people coming into the house probably because he can't recognise them. So sad as he was once a very sociable man.
     

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