Looking ahead

Angela

Registered User
May 28, 2003
151
Wales
I have had rather a stressful day with the daughter and son of a lady who has advanced dementia. The lady had a sudden decline a few weeks ago and had been in a general hospital until a few days ago, when she was assessed as needing full time nursing care. Now that the lady has gone into care the family have to sort out all the financial and other personal business, which, they have no idea about. They dont even know who Mums solicitor is. The lady is very poorly and is unable to communicate in anyway.

My message then is to remind everyone of the importance of preparing for the future in any event. (Im 31, and until today I have only ever considered arranging a will.)
The problems that the family are now facing are almost uncomprehensible, and Im worried about how I can help elivate these next week when I meet them.
But dosent this just bring it home how important it is, especially when there is a diagnosis of dementia, to ensure that we are prepared for these events.

For further information, please see the sticky thread on the discussion board for advice sheets such as Enduring power of attorney, choices in care, future medical treatments and financial and legal tips.

Looking ahead will not only ensure less headwork for us as carers, but will ensure that the person for whom we care is able to plan for their future.
 

Ruthie

Registered User
Jul 9, 2003
114
South Coast
Couldn't agree more!

Hi Angela!

As I think I've said elsewhere, I've recently realised that one of the best bits of advice we were given early in the course of my husband's disease was that he should have an Enduring Power of Attorney prepared. He was able to take this on board and immediately saw a solicitor and had one drawn up.

Some years later the time has now come for the EPA to be registered, and it is a relief to know what to do and I am thankful that it is all in place, as it would be much more expensive and complicated to go through any other route.

It has brought home to me how important this is, and although (I think!) I am still mentally competent, I have instructed our solicitor to draw up an EPA for me, as I wouldn't like to give our sons an additional problem if the situation arises that I can't manage my own affairs.

We also made new wills some time ago, as the ones we had made when our boys were tiny were very out of date.

I'm also thinking that I should prepare an "Advance Directive" or "Living Will" to register my wishes regarding treatment or otherwise if I were to become totally incapacitated - if nothing else it must be a help to relatives and medical staff in deciding what is appropriate.

I'm just writing this to back you up. It's a sensitive issue for most people, but it is so important to make sure that affairs are in order, for one's own peace of mind and to spare additional problems and grief to loved ones.

Thanks for all your postings.

Kind regards

Ruthie
 

Angela

Registered User
May 28, 2003
151
Wales
Thank you Ruthie
Yes ive got it all lined up for my family now, we will ALL have EPofA, living wills and wills!
My professional opinion... your still competant!.... just be careful it rubs off!
 

Sheila

Registered User
Oct 23, 2003
2,259
West Sussex
EPA

I have to agree, for goodness sake, get EPA's set up before they are needed, we had a real nightmare and it took a lot out of me, so every one, if you havn't done it, do it now!!!
She,
XX
 

Izzy

Volunteer Moderator
Aug 31, 2003
61,090
68
Dundee
Can anyone clarify for me - is enduring power of attorney the same as power of attorney. We both had power of attorny drawn up as soon as my husband had the diagnosis and reading the posts about enduring power of attorney I'm not sure if they're the same thing.
(I'm talking about Scots Law - and I know that this can be different.)

Thanks
 

Angela

Registered User
May 28, 2003
151
Wales
Oh now I dont know about Scottish law, but I can tell you that there is a difference between the Enduring Power of Attorney (EPofA) and the Power of Attorney. Enduring is still able to be used (after registration with the Court of Proetection,) after the person has become mentally incapable. I BELIEVE just power of attorney becomes less valid after the person has lost the capacity to undertsand the purpose of the document. Please do check this though, especially for Scottish Law, possibly with the Society or your local Citizens Advice Bureau.
 

Izzy

Volunteer Moderator
Aug 31, 2003
61,090
68
Dundee
Powers of Attorney

Following my last posting regarding EPAs and whether these were the same as the Power of Attorney in Scotland I have since checked this out. I don't know if it's any help to anyone in Scotland but this is the information I got from our solicitor. We have a 'continuing power of attorney'. This relates to all financial matters. We are now getting a'welfare power of attorney' which relates to the person's care. There is obviously an important difference as the continuing power of attorney would not help in situations when decisions about care have to be taken.

Hope this is clear.

Cheers
Izzy
 

Sue

Registered User
Nov 26, 2003
1
Fife
Thanks Izzy for your post. I have a Power of Attorney and had been getting a bit alarmed reading about the problems some people have had with EPAs. Was wondering whether things are different in Scotland, and you've answered my question. A friendly Social Worker had told me about Welfare Power of Attorney - think I'd better do something about it!

Sue