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lithium possible cure?

phofferber5555

New member
Sep 19, 2020
3
I am a 68 year old male with diabetes and neuropathy of my feet. I had read online that lithium would help my neuropathy. So I began taking 120 mg of lithium orotate daily. It did not help. But after about three weeks I began to notice memory improvement. I work as a security guard and would have people come back in asking if I remembered them coming in. I didn't. But after the lithium I started remembering them. My general overall memory recall has gotten very good. I did not even realize that my memory had diminished. But I should have suspected it as I had two aunts, two uncles, a fraternal grandmother, and a maternal grandfather with Alzheimers.
I was talking with an 80 year old friend and told him about my experience. He told me he was having a problem recognizing faces. He started taking 120 mg of lithium orotate daily. He now has no problem recognizing faces and his general memory recall is now very good. His wife was so impressed she has started taking it even though she has no memory problems.
It is well known now that the brain has neuroplasticity. Could lithium facilitate this? Is the brain substituting aluminum (another metal) for a lack of lithium in patients with alzheimer's in the tangles that are formed? My research on the internet showed some studies that lithium does play a role in neurogenesis. Also that it halted and even reversed Alzheimers. Remember when thyroid goiters were rampant and someone finally figured out it was a lack of iodine.
 

jennifer1967

Registered User
Mar 15, 2020
955
Southampton
isnt lithium usually used for mental health problems bi polar and mania maybe and you need blood tests regularly to check on vital organs that lithium can damage i knew someone who took it for that so be careful and check with gp just googled it to check my information is right and if take too much there are serious issues.
 

nitram

Registered User
Apr 6, 2011
21,052
North Manchester
isnt lithium usually used for mental health problems bi polar maybe and you need blood tests regularly to check on vital organs that lithium can damage i knew someone who took it for that so be careful and check with gp
The lithium used to treat bi polar is lithium carbonate, the OP is referring to lithium orotate which contains far less lithium.
 

Shedrech

Volunteer Moderator
Dec 15, 2012
9,310
Yorkshire
might be of interest

" Large population-based studies like this are extremely useful for identifying factors linked with dementia risk, but they can’t tell us what the root cause of an association might be. A number of factors relating to where someone lives could play a role in how many people go on to develop dementia and this study did not take differences in access to healthcare across the country into account, nor does it look at how financially well-off people are in these different areas– a factor that is closely interwoven with many aspects of our health."

personally I would check with my GP before adding any such supplement into my daily diet
 

phofferber5555

New member
Sep 19, 2020
3
The doses of lithium used for bipolar disease are much higher like 300 mg 4 times a day. The main risk is kidney impairment. 120 mg of lithium orotate contains only 5 mg of elemental lithium. As to asking your doctor about it, I have had people ask their doctor about it. The answer is hell no! My sister currently is undergoing treatment for alzeheimers and that's what the specialist said. I have googled alzheimers with lithium. There are a few studies showing low dose lithium to halt and in some cases reverse alzheimers.
 

Palerider

Registered User
Aug 9, 2015
2,011
North West
I am a 68 year old male with diabetes and neuropathy of my feet. I had read online that lithium would help my neuropathy. So I began taking 120 mg of lithium orotate daily. It did not help. But after about three weeks I began to notice memory improvement. I work as a security guard and would have people come back in asking if I remembered them coming in. I didn't. But after the lithium I started remembering them. My general overall memory recall has gotten very good. I did not even realize that my memory had diminished. But I should have suspected it as I had two aunts, two uncles, a fraternal grandmother, and a maternal grandfather with Alzheimers.
I was talking with an 80 year old friend and told him about my experience. He told me he was having a problem recognizing faces. He started taking 120 mg of lithium orotate daily. He now has no problem recognizing faces and his general memory recall is now very good. His wife was so impressed she has started taking it even though she has no memory problems.
It is well known now that the brain has neuroplasticity. Could lithium facilitate this? Is the brain substituting aluminum (another metal) for a lack of lithium in patients with alzheimer's in the tangles that are formed? My research on the internet showed some studies that lithium does play a role in neurogenesis. Also that it halted and even reversed Alzheimers. Remember when thyroid goiters were rampant and someone finally figured out it was a lack of iodine.
Can you present some strong evidence on lithium use in dementia? I personally would leave the stuff well alone, even a small overdose can be highly toxic -this is why people on lithium treatment have lithium levels taken regularly.
 

Shedrech

Volunteer Moderator
Dec 15, 2012
9,310
Yorkshire
sorry @phofferber5555
but I sincerely doubt this
"There are a few studies showing low dose lithium to halt and in some cases reverse alzheimers."
don't you think if this were the case it would be in wide use ?

I understand you want to help your sister ... when dementia is present we feel so helpless and can be tempted to clutch at straws because we so wish we could do something to 'make it better'

please listen to her specialist
 

Jaded'n'faded

Registered User
Jan 23, 2019
947
High Peak
Please don't self-medicate!

Put it this way, if your GP offered you some drug/medicine but told you, 'I'm afraid this stuff hasn't been tested. There are a few random studies but nothing that shows the slightest proof because the studies are not conducted scientifically. Oh and we have no idea about proper dosage or possible serious side effects or toxic interactions with any of the other drugs you're on... but here you go - take it!'

Would you? I think not.

Also, just because something is sold in a health food shop, doesn't mean it's good for your health or even that it has been tested in any way.
 

phofferber5555

New member
Sep 19, 2020
3
Please don't self-medicate!

Put it this way, if your GP offered you some drug/medicine but told you, 'I'm afraid this stuff hasn't been tested. There are a few random studies but nothing that shows the slightest proof because the studies are not conducted scientifically. Oh and we have no idea about proper dosage or possible serious side effects or toxic interactions with any of the other drugs you're on... but here you go - take it!'

Would you? I think not.

Also, just because something is sold in a health food shop, doesn't mean it's good for your health or even that it has been tested in any way.
I am just throwing out there my own experience as well as a friend's. I did not take it for dementia. I started noticing memory improvement with no other changes in my life. I have had no ill effects from taking it. If I knew my memory was fading away, yes I would be looking for anything I could find to stop it or reverse it. I have nothing to gain if people try this. My motivation is what if this does fix the problem. Millions of people could be helped from a horrible disease. Imagine drinking iodine? No? Well they put it in our salt. Thyroid goiters disappeared because of this essential mineral.
 

jennifer1967

Registered User
Mar 15, 2020
955
Southampton
i understand why you posted about lithium and in years ahead if it proves to be beneficial for dementia and doctors approve then maybe think again. im just worried that there are members that are desperate to try anything to slow the progress of dementia that they will latch on to anything that suggests this and try it without guidance. and treat the research as approval.