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Lifestyle changes could prevent or delay dementia: Guardian 31 July

kindred

Registered User
Apr 8, 2018
2,495

canary

Registered User
Feb 25, 2014
13,430
South coast
This story is in several papers along with the headlines that 40% of dementia cases are preventable (or at least, delayable). I agree with kindred - it is shifting the blame onto the victims.

I have several angry thoughts about this, but I wont post them as it would probably be removed.
 

Rosettastone57

Registered User
Oct 27, 2016
1,354
I read this as well. In fact,my mother in law had 7 of these factors, the hearing loss ,social isolation ,depression, high blood pressure , poor education, smoker, obesity. She also had other mental health issues especially OCD, whether these preexisting conditions are a factor isn't clear
 

Starbright

Registered User
Apr 8, 2018
529
This story is in several papers along with the headlines that 40% of dementia cases are preventable (or at least, delayable). I agree with kindred - it is shifting the blame onto the victims.

I have several angry thoughts about this, but I wont post them as it would probably be removed.
Oh yes !!!!! Me tooooo @canary
 

Melles Belles

Registered User
Jul 4, 2017
451
South east
I agree up to a point. This has been in the news previously.
My dad had Alzheimer’s. He had hearing problems for several years but wouldn’t wear a hearing aid, and was socially isolated. Both his choice. (It did mean he didn’t have too listen to mum though.)
Therefore I will be getting my hearing checked and will wear an aid if needed In the future.
If traffic pollution is a potential risk factor that should give us all another push to improve our air quality.
 

Soroptimist

Registered User
Jun 10, 2018
64
I was so angry about this article!! Dementia is not a lifestyle choice. What I don't understand is why the medical profession can't be honest about the fact they do not yet understand dementia. Yes healthy living can help delay the onset sometimes, and yes they have identified genetic cases in a small percentage of cases, but that leaves the majority of cases where they still have NO CLUE why it develops.
My mum's mum had dementia, my mum had dementia, and they had very healthy lifestyles, so it's likely I will get it. All the rubbish about "well that's anecdotal" cuts no mustard with me. There is clearly a hereditary factor that is not understood. A senior health professional fobbed me off with "follow the mediterranean diet" when I pointed this out. They make me so mad!!!!
 

Jaded'n'faded

Registered User
Jan 23, 2019
902
High Peak
These diet and lifestyle changes are great and could well make you live longer. But what is by far the biggest risk factor for getting dementia?

Being very old.... :(
 

Canadian Joanne

Volunteer Moderator
Apr 8, 2005
16,679
66
Toronto, Canada
I still firmly believe that the causes of AD are multifactorial. Still, the main factor appears to be aging.

I do find these articles very frustrating. Is it not obvious that having a good diet and keeping fit will help in many other ways, such as fending off diabetes and heart disease? There is an element of blaming the victim here.
 

Bunpoots

Volunteer Host
Apr 1, 2016
4,774
Nottinghamshire
My mum and dad and my aunt all lead healthy lifestyles. Their diet was traditional British meat and two veg for the most part, with fish twice a week. They had the odd glass of wine with dinner but I never saw them drunk. They were probably slightly overweight- but still slim by today’s standards - dad was the fattest and drank the most and he was the last to succumb by at least a decade, in spite of being the eldest by a couple of years. Mum and aunt (twins) both had type 2 diabetes by 60 as did their older brother who also had VasD.

None of my grandparents had dementia but one grandad (mum’s side) died, at work, of a heart attack aged 59. My gran, his wife, lived to 95 - no dementia. Presumably they lived similar lifestyles.

I think genetics play a large part. I also think I’m doomed!

It seems unfair to blame people’s choices when nobody really knows the cause.