Laughing like a hyena

Discussion in 'ARCHIVE FORUM: Support discussions' started by Loiner, Nov 28, 2005.

  1. Loiner

    Loiner Registered User

    Oct 29, 2005
    73
    Leeds, UK
    I don't know about other ppl, but mum seems to enjoy going bonkers (yeah, not PC but its accurate) she laughs all the time at things that are not funny and I must admit sometimes, it taxes me to my limit.
    It's not nice for carer's but ppl with dementia well...

    David

    P.S. any spare mental energy plz send to me, I am tapped out
     
  2. Lynne

    Lynne Registered User

    Jun 3, 2005
    3,433
    Suffolk,England
    Only response I can think of (in the absence of similar personal experience) is that it's better than continual weeping, which some confused AD patients seem to do when they can't understand what's happening & why they can't "go home".
    Not unsympathetic with you David, I know it's sometimes the "little but constant" things which can drive you nuts.
    {Hug}
     
  3. daughter

    daughter Registered User

    Mar 16, 2005
    824
    Hi David,

    That must be a little embarrassing if it happens at inappropriate times! There's a resident in my Dad's Home who is always laughing. I must admit we encourage her when we visit because it's so nice to hear some laughter, although I can imagine it must get a little wearing after a while. This resident also likes to 'playfully' hit her husband when he visits, I say 'playfully' because it looks like it verges on 'painfully', although she is still being good natured.

    Anyway, here comes a little spare mental energy for you zzzzzzzzzzz..ping :)

    Best wishes,
     
  4. PurplePoppy

    PurplePoppy Registered User

    Oct 3, 2005
    53
    Whilst my mum doesn't laugh all the time, she sometimes laughs at things that just aren't funny. Usually she'll say something that doesn't make sense, then laugh, as if she's told some joke. I usually try and laugh with her, it's better than crying.
     
  5. Brucie

    Brucie Registered User

    Jan 31, 2004
    12,413
    near London
    there's a lot of it about - I feel the same about people who laugh at "Little Britain".. :confused:
     
  6. Loiner

    Loiner Registered User

    Oct 29, 2005
    73
    Leeds, UK
    Ah, someone else who thinks little britain isn't worth the tape its on, its' not funny, give me classic repeats like dads army or porridge anytime :D

    As to mum, yeah, she says can i go home occationally, i point out she is home, and she goes ok, and laughs

    Sounds daft, but i am glad she isn't aware enough to realise, cause she'd always dreaded something like this.
    seems a pattern in my family, my mum looked after my grandad when he drank himself into dementia in the late 40's and 50's
    I've seen a lot of demetia patients in my time and mum is what i term one of the good ones, still when it;s your own mum it aint good at all.
    day by day is all i can do and pray for the best

    David
     
  7. Lynne

    Lynne Registered User

    Jun 3, 2005
    3,433
    Suffolk,England
    When I think of all the desperate prayers we here must offer up, I lose faith in the power of it. (No offence meant to anyone, just hurting)
     
  8. Brucie

    Brucie Registered User

    Jan 31, 2004
    12,413
    near London
    Jan and I used to attend our little local church, only to Evensong, but every week. The tiny congregation there was all over 70, and they were the brightest, nicest people one could meet. The vicars, over the time we attended, varied greatly, from the career vicar who was there when we moved here [a great man], to a range of 'second career' vicars, who were really filling in before retirement after working somewhere in Human Resources. These guys always wanted to end the service early to get back to TV on Sunday evenings.

    When Jan became ill there was concern at the church, and prayers. We eventually left the church services because we became imprisoned at home.

    As Jan got worse, and finally moved to her care home, I lost all reason to believe in anything, but, because I was the PC professional in the village, I continued to produce the church magazine for many years.

    The magazine editor was a steely, fantastic Scottish lady [not only was I a PC professional, but I have never believed in that other 'PC', and nothing on Earth would have me call her a 'Scottish Woman', as the politically corrupt [whoops, that should be correct] nitwits would have it these days].

    She knew my views on religion had changed but she always said "we always pray for you and Jan'.

    When I came together with Nina, she said "see - our prayers worked. This must be providential'.

    Last week I took the current vicar, an excellent vicar and young mother, to see Jan, as I have been trying to prepare things for the time when Jan eventually passes on. Before we went we had a short time at the vicarage, where we discussed the form of service, charges, etc, and she asked permission to end that part with some prayers.

    Well, I had explained my own views but said that I believed that Jan would like it. She said "that's what we are here for, to pray for you both at times like this when you have more important things to contend with". The prayers were very moving, I found, much to my surprise. Perhaps it was that here was someone who cared about Jan's condition, in a way that so many, including her own family, didn't.

    We visited Jan and the vicar crawled with me and with Jan. Before she left, she again said some prayers directly to Jan. No sign of anything from Jan of course, but again, I felt very moved.
    I agree, if we think there is somebody 'up there' who listens. Maybe there is, maybe not.

    But I think the point is that the saying of prayers is not so much a requesting of something from a god somewhere, but it is a recognition of things gone wrong, and a 'feeling' for the person/persons concerned. A wishing things could be better.

    And somehow, that helps. :)
     
  9. frederickgt

    frederickgt Registered User

    Jun 4, 2005
    124
    Hornchurch,Essex
    dear Lynne,It takes all sorts,My wife Anna and Icontinue to say our prayers every night,taking it in turns,Anna never misses,We are bith mormons,and i know the power of prayer,and i have seen theefect it has on people,and,indeed have used it in my Priesthood office,enduring to the end is difficult,but the Lord never said it would be easy,only that it was possible.
    Anyway,to use the words of an Irish comedian,"May your Gods go with you"
     
  10. Stimpfig

    Stimpfig Registered User

    Oct 15, 2005
    135
    Germany/India
    #10 Stimpfig, Nov 28, 2005
    Last edited: Nov 28, 2005
    Dear Loiner from Leeds :p

    I wouldn't worry about the laughing. I actually feel relieved when mum has her laughing bouts. It's the aggressive phases that frighten me :eek:

    Take care,

    Sue Stimpfig
     
  11. Norman

    Norman Registered User

    Oct 9, 2003
    4,348
    Birmingham Hades
    Lynne
    I am with you on this one
    Loiner
    my wife laughs a lot when I can see nothing funny,her sense of humour has changed completly.
    Also if I relate some incident or place where I was without her she will say "I remember that do you remember what I said at the time"?
    Strange
    Norman :confused:
     
  12. Loiner

    Loiner Registered User

    Oct 29, 2005
    73
    Leeds, UK
    It's up to the individual I think about prayer, as belief in God or whoever you believe in is.
    Mum brought us up to believe and me, mum and my brother were all in the church choir when I was growing up. I believe more now than I did then, I can't explain why, I just do and find comfort in it, like bruce said.
     
  13. connie

    connie Registered User

    Mar 7, 2004
    9,519
    Frinton-on-Sea
    I sit here with tears tonight. Where have our lives gone? We are so concerned with our loved ones. WHERE ARE OUR LIVES?
    I realiaise that this is not policialy correct, but, surely there have to be TWO people within any equation. Sorry, Connie
     
  14. frederickgt

    frederickgt Registered User

    Jun 4, 2005
    124
    Hornchurch,Essex
    Dear connie,Remember the "footprints" poem?
    Was then that I carried you
     

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