Lack of sleep

Alex54

Registered User
Oct 15, 2018
192
Newtown, Wales
I am lucky if I get three/five hours of sleep a day, my wife (PWD) wakes up around three each morning and makes sure I do not get back to sleep.
Has anyone else suffered this sort of sleep deprivation and how can I get around it?
 

karaokePete

Registered User
Jul 23, 2017
5,068
N Ireland
Yes, I have the sleep deprivation problem due to my wife being active at night. Her GP increased the dosage of her anti anxiety meds last summer and that helped a little. I also try to catch a cat nap whenever I can - such as when my wife is sat in front of the TV watching quiz shows.

At times it's a very difficult situation. On one occasion last summer I had gone without sleep for so long that I just had to throw myself into a chair as I thought I was going to keel over.:(
 

PalSal

Registered User
Dec 4, 2011
777
Pratteln Switzerland
Yes, we had lots of problems with sleep and restlessness. We started using the anti-aniexty medicine in the evening which seems to help with his sleeping.
But this is a problem many of us face. And it is impossible to be patient and kind when one is sleep deprived.
We are using Dipiperon.
 

Alex54

Registered User
Oct 15, 2018
192
Newtown, Wales
I am trying something different today - I have cut down on fluid intake after midday and will wake her up for a toilet break around 10 pm.
It is far from ideal but if I can make waking up in the morning a bit later...
 

sqeaker

Registered User
May 10, 2017
26
I am lucky if I get three/five hours of sleep a day, my wife (PWD) wakes up around three each morning and makes sure I do not get back to sleep.
Has anyone else suffered this sort of sleep deprivation and how can I get around it?
Hi I am the same as my husband was getting up in the night to the bathroom, however he did not know that he wasn't going in the toilet but on the floor. So now when he moves im awake, I am so tired I try to sleep but im awake so quick, then changing beds in the early hours, so after that im fully awake and he just goes back to sleep, how do w cope
 

Alex54

Registered User
Oct 15, 2018
192
Newtown, Wales
how do w cope
The short answer is I am not coping with the sleep deprivation and blacked out last week. It's been two or so months now of constant three am wake up and not being able to get back to sleep. At best I am getting four hours of sleep a day. I tried going to sleep when my wife does, but all I do is wake up a few hours later and cannot get back off to sleep.

Well, the changes yesterday made little difference, wife still awakes at the same time in the morning. The toilet call late at night was nearly impossible and took almost an hour.

I will keep trying for a few days more days and see what happens.
 

marionq

Registered User
Apr 24, 2013
6,005
Scotland
I think you have to go back to the gp and look for sleeping tablets in the short term at least to break this pattern. With this illness phases occur where you struggle with one issue and then it’s replaced by another. I found getting my husband up to the toilet worked really well for a while but now I just can’t wake him in the middle of the night so have to accept he will be wet in the morning. This too will change at some point.
 

Alex54

Registered User
Oct 15, 2018
192
Newtown, Wales
I wonder if social services would agree to a carer staying overnight one night a month? I could then book myself into the nearby hotel and catch up on my sleep.
 

witts1973

Registered User
Jun 20, 2018
738
Leamington Spa
I am lucky if I get three/five hours of sleep a day, my wife (PWD) wakes up around three each morning and makes sure I do not get back to sleep.
Has anyone else suffered this sort of sleep deprivation and how can I get around it?
Hi would it be possible for your wife to go to a day centre to let you get perhaps a few hours in bed during the day
 

AliceA

Registered User
May 27, 2016
2,623
Good idea if there is a day centre. We do not have that facility in our area. I sleep at odd times some times, but sleep is vital.
 

swood

Registered User
Sep 10, 2017
8
Very comforting to see that others too are suffering from continuously interrupted sleep.my husband can get up to try to go to the toilet up to 5 times throughout the night.he doesn't know where he's going is very wobbly and shuffles hanging onto door knobs etc in the past has gone to the toilet in the hall by the bed etc so each time I have to get up to take him.this has been going on for two years and I am exhausted.all the doctor has offerred is a bladder relaxant tablet which doesn't really work .has anybody got any ideas.he is very rigid and in a world of his own on waking and won't use a bottle.
 

witts1973

Registered User
Jun 20, 2018
738
Leamington Spa
Good idea if there is a day centre. We do not have that facility in our area. I sleep at odd times some times, but sleep is vital.
It certainly is vital, before I had help from carers I was on the verge of a nervous breakdown,a few hours sleep a night for months,I switched my phone off and couldn't even speak to friends.I hope things get better for you
 

Alex54

Registered User
Oct 15, 2018
192
Newtown, Wales
Update: Saturday 26th January.
Last night was exceptionally demanding, basically, my wife (PWD) needed help at eleven, one, three and five in the morning. What was different is that I went to bed at 6 pm and managed to grab a few hours sleep. Between the hours of eleven and five, I think I was just dozing most of the time as getting off to sleep is something I find hard to do.
The good news is that for the first time in years the loud tinnitus in the back of my head has gone.

wife to go to a day centre
Day centers are out of question for us since our doctor has taken away my driving license for one blackout last week. Also even although I need the sleep I find it also impossible to sleep during the day (unless I sit down on the sofa and watch TV).
 

jenniferjean

Registered User
Apr 2, 2016
655
Basingstoke, Hampshire
I'm coping with the toilet visits during the night, but what has started now is that a visit to the toilet often is followed by a wish to go and get a drink of water. I'm afraid to let him cope with the stairs during the night, for one thing he can never remember where the light switch is. So I have to get up and go with him, that's when I find it difficult to get back to sleep.
 

marionq

Registered User
Apr 24, 2013
6,005
Scotland
I put sensor lights on the skirting boards on hall and stairs. No switching on and they are bright and clear. They attach with a sticker so no need for a handyman.
 

NORTHSIDE

Registered User
Jan 28, 2017
84
Northumberland
Update: Saturday 26th January.
Last night was exceptionally demanding, basically, my wife (PWD) needed help at eleven, one, three and five in the morning. What was different is that I went to bed at 6 pm and managed to grab a few hours sleep. Between the hours of eleven and five, I think I was just dozing most of the time as getting off to sleep is something I find hard to do.
The good news is that for the first time in years the loud tinnitus in the back of my head has gone.


Day centers are out of question for us since our doctor has taken away my driving license for one blackout last week. Also even although I need the sleep I find it also impossible to sleep during the day (unless I sit down on the sofa and watch TV).
My wife has just started at a day centre, they pick up and drop off by mini bus and only charge £1 each way. Could you find a similar service nearby? The only problem I have is so far she has refused to get on the bus and I have had to follow in the car. Nothings straight forward! Good luck
 

PalSal

Registered User
Dec 4, 2011
777
Pratteln Switzerland
j
I put sensor lights on the skirting boards on hall and stairs. No switching on and they are bright and clear. They attach with a sticker so no need for a handyman.
@marionq Where did you find sensor light with sticker....not sure but sounds like a good idea. can you post a photo how they look in place. (would have be possible)